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Volume II. 



LASELL SEMINARY, NOVEMBER 18, 1876. 



Number 1, 



Editor— IDA M. PHILLIPS. 
Assistants— EVA BRAGDON, CARRIE KENDIG, 



ELLA STOCKING. 



Again the circling seasons have revolved, and we find 
ourselves entering upon the second volume of the " Lasell 
Leaves." Contrary to most foliage, these leaves put forth 
their tender shoots in Autumn. Bravely did they withstand 
Winter's keen blasts, and now that Autumn is again with us, 
they bloom forth once more. This time it is to greet new 
faces. Many of last year's friends are gone, but we trust that 
our Leaves will be as warmly greeted, and meet with as much 
success now, as before. Our Leaves aim not merely to amuse, 
but to help bring forth all the varied talents of our number. 
We want to make our paper a success in its way ; and now that 
we are only in the beginning of the school year, we predict 
that great things will happen before the year closes. 

Although our paper has already been in existence a year, this 
is its first appearance before the public. There are so many 
papers at the present time, and so many brilliant productions 
of all kinds, that it seems as if no space were left on which our 
modest sheet may obtain even a footing. But in spite of these 
existing circumstances that seem to debar our onward progress, 
we will strive, though commencing on so small a scale, to 
steadily advance in the up-hill path of literature. We do not 
claim much for our paper now; but, as the greatest achievements 
have sprung from very small beginnings, we have no doubt 
that our Leaves may one day gain some attention in the great 
world of letters. As young women, we can at least show the 
world something that young women can do, and in a measure 
prove the truth of our motto, Dux femina facti. 



fQ)!S©|@!gU 

CHAP. II. 

Now it came to pass in the last year of the reign of Ulysses, 
that the good Prince Charles; who ruled with all gentleness 
over his court in Saints' Rest, a goodly land and fair to see, 
which is but a short journey from that city in which dwell 
many wise and learned men, called unto his court many fair 
damsels -from all the country far and near; saying, "Come, 
dwell with me. Yc shall be happy, and gain much wisdom." 

Now the fathers and mothers of these damsels heard the 
words of the prince, that they were good ; and they said unto 
their daughters, "Behold, the great Prince Charles desires your 
presence at his court, where you may learn many things and 
profit much." So, on the 21st day of the ninth month, as many 
maidens as the prince could aco im ''late, many of them 
iv v. •..;;■•.' i ';•■ ' , said, "Behold, 

great prince, we are here I i do thy bidding and to be instructed 
by thy wise people " Then Charles welcomed Himti with al[ 
kindness; bra; for seven -days there was much ex< nent,.and 
many of tiiejtaaidens did weep and sorely mourn to return to 

lir dwellings; and it did come -to pass that 0»e ungiateful 
damsel did bne daj eave the court, and was neve: 'ore. 



X 



Now, among the many wise maidens whom the prince had 
collected, was one Caroline, who did have the entire keeping 
of the young damsels, and did instruct them in the mysteries 
of ancient men and of their writings. She had been at the 
court many days, and her power was confessed by all the 
maidens. There was also one Angeline, and the knowledge of 
this maiden knew no bounds. It did reach from the sands of 
the earth to the stars of heaven. And it came to pass that this 
maiden was much beloved by all the damsels, because she did 
charm their ears with pleasing narrations. 

The prince had also called to his temple two maidens whose 
names were Mary. One did instruct the damsels in the art of 
figures, and also did teach them to undertake many difficult 
feats for the purpose of developing their strength. Another, 
whose name by interpretation is Mary, was from a far-off land, 
and did endeavor to teach the damsels many foreign tongues. 
There was also one Jane, who did teach the damsels to 
represent by drawings and paintings every living object. 
Then there was one Isaiah, whose learning was above anything 
the damsels had ever known; and, with the aid of many words 
of unknown origin, he did instruct them in the tongues of 
Greek and Latin. 

Now, behold, all these wise people did abide at the court for 
many days, and wisdom did abound among them. But there 
was a lack of music at the temple ; and it came to pass that the 
good Charles did bid one Joseph, a musician, to come into his 
presence ; and when he was come he spake unto the prince 
and said, ''Behold, there is no man who can excel me in 
music." When the prince heard the words of Joseph, he bade 
him come to the court and instruct the damsels to play on 
every kind of musical instrument. And it came to pass that 
there was wailing and discontent for many days among the 
maidens ; and they said, " Behold, the ways of this man's music 
are beyond our comprehension." But the prince had also 
commanded one Harry to come and teach the damsels to raise 
their voices in singing ; and it came to pass that the man did 
find favor in the sight of the damsels, for he was very gentle 
and meek. 

And there was also one Samuel, a man who was known in 
all the land because of his mighty voice ; and behold, when 
Samuel came to the court to entertain the damsels, they were 
much affrighted by the voice, which was like unto the sound of 
rolling thunder. Then he did say to the damsels, "Be not 
afraid ; behold, I can teach you to laugh, and to weep, and to 
talk like all manner of people, so ye can bring down dwellings 
wherein ye are." This much pleased the damsels, and it 
came to pass that Samuel spent many daj 7 s there. 

Besides all these that we have mentioned, there were many 
other wise men and maidens who did instruct the maidens many 
things by which they gained much knowledge. But the 
damsels did mourn because there were no youths at the court, 
and they did go to the prince, and did say, " Behold, we have 
heard that on a certain day of this month will be a great 
procession of all young men of the land round about. Per- 
mit us, we pray thee, to visit the great city, that we may 



LA SELL' LEA VES. 



behold the wonderful sight." Then it came to pass that they 
did go to the city, and were much delighted with all they saw. 
Now there were many other things which came to pass, but 
which cannot be here recorded; but the damsels remained for 
many days at the court, and all went well with them. 



'Twas the day for election, 
And all through the house 

There was general excitement, 
E'en down to the mouse. 

And all of its inmates 
Had minds of their own ; 

Some for Wheeler and Hayes, 
Some for Tilden, were prone. 

When something like this 
At the table Prof, said : 
"After lunch you may vote, 
For only one pin a head." 

" Polls open in chapel 

Ten minutes — no more ; 
Promptly, after that time, 
We to all close the door." 

What a rush the girls made 
From the dining-room out ! 

Took the chapel by storm, 
And not without shout. 

For paper to write on 

One ran to her seat, 
Probably afraid, if she walked, 

She might suffer defeat. 

In state, by the polls, 
Grave judges sat — four — 

Allowing one vote apiece 
To the girls, and no more. 

Policemen in uniform 

Paced up and down, 
Guarding strictly the peace, 

With a word or a frown. 

All seemed anxious to vote ; 

But what a surprise, 
When some only by force 

Appeared before th' assize ! 

Soon "time up " was announced, 
The ballot box closed; 

At dinner that day 
The result was disclosed. 

With breathless attention, 
Prof. B.'s words were heard — 

Sixty-six votes for Hayes, 
And, — wonder unheard, — 

Tilden and Hendricks had four, 

And Cooper had one; 
So, at Lasell's ballot-box, 

The Republicans won. 



a 8 s 



1 stood by the sea. The full moon beamed through rifted 
clouds, cresting the purple waves with gold. Slowly and 
grandly they rolled over the glistening sands, and broke upon 
the gray, mossy, vine hung rock against which I leaned. Long 
I listened to the music of the waves. Long I gazed at the 
fantastic wreathing of the foam; then glanced at the beach on 
which I stood. The coming wave broke at my feet and then 
retreated, leaving there a shell pearly white, wrought most 
curiously into spiral convolution. I rescued it from the clutch 
of the approaching wave, and raised it to my lips. Lo ! there 
issued thence a clear and ringing sound. Again I breathed 
upon it, and again it sounded, louder, clearer than before ; and 
it seemed like the tinkling of silver bells. Then I saw a form 






rising from the foam, and the messenger of the sea-queen stood 
before me. Jewels gleamed amid her sea-green tresses, and a 
zone of flashing splendor encircled her waist. Her eyes shone 
with a fiery, angry light, and a frown contracted her brow. 

"Audacious mortal!" she exclaimed, "knowest thou not that 
death is the penalty of those who presume thus to intermeddle 
with the possessions of the sea-nymphs? Nevertheless, I know 
thou couldst not have the power thus to make sound from the 
war trumpet of the queen, unless thou hadst some things in 
common with us; and therefore shalt. thou . ! «_;end to the 
palace of the queen, and behold what mortal e3 7 e never saw 
before. Follow me." 

Then, placing the shell in my hand, from which it had 
dropped in my astonishment, she sprang upon the crest of a 
wave, -and disappeared. Compelled by an irresistible impulse, 
I followed her, on, on, past coral reefs and various rocks, until 
'at length we paused, and my feet rested on the ocean's floor. 
All was midnight darkness, but near me stood my guide. She 
stamped lightly, and instantly a thousand lights were blazing 
around us. We were standing beside a wall of rock, whose 
boundary my eye could not reach. Then I saw that bright 
green sea-weeds had wound themselves around me so closely 
that my form was entirely concealed by them. 

"You are completely disguised," said my guide, "and none 
save the queen can discern that you are not one of us. Now 
blow." 

I obeyed, and there followed a sound like the concert of 
many harps. I started back astonished. 

" 'Tis but the echo," she said. As she spoke, a seam 
appeared in the rock. The opening grew larger, and my guide 
passed through. I, following, found myself in the presence of 
the queen. Oh! what a scene of magnificence burst upon my 
view. As far as my eye could reach was splendor such as I 
never before imagined. Far, far away the walls of the grotto 
were studded with gems flashing purple, crimson and gold. 

My gaze was riveted upon the queen. She sat upon a throne 
of mother-of-pearl, white and pink, surmounted by emerald 
spires. Over her head was a canopy of rubies and diamonds, 
and her feet rested upon the shell of a tortoise, polished to more 
than mirror-like brightness. She was slight in form, and yet 
majestic. On her brow gleamed a single gem, a pure pearl. 
Her purple tresses swept in waves of richness over her regal 
robe, which was woven in cunning device of the fibres of 
bright green sea-weed, and spangled with scarlet shells. 

It was the birthnight festival of the queen, and the members 
of her court were presenting their offerings. Now came one 
bearing a steel-blue sword, stolen from the sword-fish. Then 
followed one of commanding mien, bearing a robe of misty 
brilliance, and the queen cast on her a bright smile, knowing 
the labor with which it had been wrought; for the threads had 
been stolen from the spider's web, and strung with pearls. Then 
another bore a barge, its curved prow of whitest ivory, and 
lined within with brightest feathers plucked from the humming- 
bird's wing. Then followed another, pale and trembling, and 
presented a miniature iceberg ; and as the queen bent over it, a 
glittering tear fell upon it, and new radiance was transfused 
through its substance. So I knew that the fay had erred, and 
that now the expiation was completed. Then my^nide stepped- 
proudly forward, leading me by the hand, and said, "0 Queen, 
many are the rich, rare gifts presented to thee to-night, but 
none of thy el tin train dare vie with me in bringing a new 
subject. Behold her, fairest Queen." And then I knelt 
before her ; and as I reverently pressed her hand to my lips, I 
awoke and found it all a dream. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Leaflets, 

The total number of students at Lasell this year is seventy- 
four. Twelve are day scholars. 

The average age of the scholars this year is V\-£%. The 
average last year was 1T/ T . 

There are thirteen States represented at the Seminary: 
Maine has two representatives; New Hampshire, one ; Massa- 
chusetts, forty-two; Connecticut, eight; New York, three; New 
Jersey, one; Pennsylvania, three; District of Columbia, two; 
Indiana, three ; Illinois, one ; Iowa, one ; Michigan, one ; and 
Wisconsin, one. 



Why do the girls of this school resemble Chinese women ? 
Ans. — Because each "Foot" is so small. 

Why should the girls be allowed to leave the Seminary often? 
Ans. — Because they have homes (Holmes) so near. 

Why is this such a sedate company ? 

Ans. — Because there is only one here who is " Young." 

Why do the girls here have such a temptation to flirt ? 
Ans. — Because we have several " Williams" and a gay lord 
(Gaylord) among us. 



Mlgpgfii® it L.a-selL, 

The evening of the 20th of October was the scene of a grand 
fancy ball in Gymnasium Hall, at Lasell. Every one was 
desirous to attend, and the kind invitations were immediately 
accepted. During the day of the 20th, and in fact for many 
days previous, great preparations had been made. Nothing 
was talked of but the eventful evening. The day passed, as 
all days must; and as soon as the sun had departed and left 
"the fairest village of the plain" in darkness, every door was 
locked, and such peals of laughter as sounded through the 
classic halls were never heard before. 

At the appointed hour the guests assembled, and such a 
scene as was presented is almost beyond description. There 
were seen old and young, queens and peasants, amid the 
sparkle of diamonds and glitter of gold. There was probably 
a greater display of silken white robes there than was ever 
collected before. Among the gay throng were seen some of 
the good sisters of charity, who, with their long black robes 
and white kerchiefs, made a pleasing contrast to the show of 
wealth. It would be omitting the best part of the entertain- 
ment should we forget to mention " Barnum's fat woman." 
This character created quite a sensation during the first of the 
evening, and a great deal of merriment after the masks were 
removed, and it was discovered who the fair young lady 
really was. 

The hours, however, fled all too fast, and the time for unmask- 
ing arrived ; and then refreshments of the most excellent kind 
were served. After this, the music and dancing were continued 
until even the brightest eyes began to grow dim, and the most 
nimble feet would lag through the measures of the famous 
Virginia Reel. Finally, the ringing of the great bell in the 
tower warned the guests to depart, and soon all that remained 
of the festive scene was a pile of gloves, ribbons and sue! 
3inall articles, which next morning were consignee I i the 
"basket" by a relentless hand. And so was ended the (ii < 
jail of the season at Lasell. 



I@IgM @S Mil, 

Life is the formation of a great bouquet, for which God gives 
us time as the green filling in which to place our deeds as 
flowers. Mistake not weeds for flowers, but may there be 
many pure white blossoms in those formed by us ; so that, when 
the finished work be presented to the Master, he may pronounce 
it good and acceptable in the sight of Heaven, and may it have 
a place in the heavenly kingdom where the perfume shall last 
through eternity. 



That, in this charming village, 

The youths are very few, 
Is a fact that could never be denied 

By any one who knew. 

This being so, it is not strange, 

That, on that eventful night 
When the torchlight procession passed through our yard, 

It seemed a refreshing sight. 

The nine o'clock bell had tolled the knell 

Of another departed day, 
And we, one and all, to our rooms were gone, 

Its summons to obey. 

But only a few minutes had gone by, 

When music was heard on the air; 
Nearer and nearer yet it came, 

Banishing all thought of care. 

And as those martial strains 

Came nearer, and yet more near, 
Every girl rushed to the window, 

To see as well as hear. 

And what a sight burst on our view ! 

There, coming up our drive, 
Was a company of gallant youths, 

To the music of drum and fife; 

In scarlet uniform arrayed, 

The trimmings all of white; 
Whi le each one held a torch in hand, 

Which shed a brilliant light. 

At a word from their commander, 

They halted before the door, 
And cheered the " young women of Lasell," 

In a way unheard of before. 

The girls who roomed in front that night 

Were gayest of the gay ; 
While those who roomed where they couldn't see 

Rushed to the " hall " in a familiar way. 
\ 
"Oh, can't we?" ("Go right back!") "Oh, mayn't we?" 
("Go right back!") 

Was heard throughout the hall ; 
But at last the pleading made a way, 

And they went to the front, one and all. 

Then the pi*ocession marched away, 

And soon was out of sight; 
When we went back to our separate rooms, 

And composed ourselves for the night. 

Just here we must take room to say 

That they were all for Hayes; 
Just as all we Republicans are 

In these election days. 

But of the Democratic procession, 

We would not omit to speak, 
Notwithstanding the fact, my hearers, 

We thought it rather weak. 

That came along in a night or two, 

A most imposing sight, 
Composed of lads of a tender age. 

With Japanese lanterns for light. 

But then, Democrats, don't feel bad; 

They did the best they could, 
And probably thought their procession 

Would do all sorts of good. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



How naturally comes the thought or question, when we are 
forming plans or prosecuting them, "Will this please such 
or such a person ?" And no sooner have we decided whether it 
will or not, than some one else is presented to our minds, with 
all their probable opinions on the subject, good, bad or indiffer- 
ent. In fact, we wish to please all these persons in question, 
and are willing to forego our own pleasure to accomplish this 
end. Now, as we look at the situation, is it not ridiculous ? 
Wanting to gratify every one, at the forfeiture of our own 
pleasure and even judgment in the matter. If so vexatious a 
problem were given us in mathematics, the majority of lis 
would give it up ; but it being only one in life, we never think 
of such a thing, but go bravely to work to solve it. To use 
another figure, we must take several shades and blend them 
into a color that will be agreeable to all eyes. This is next to 
impossible ; for what we consider delightful, another pro- 
nounces tame, and still another has a different verdict to give. 
There are always those who will find fault ; and, seemingly, their 
occupation would be gone if this privilege were taken from 
them. Sometimes on consideration we change our plans, but 
very likely they may give no better satisfaction even then. 
What is to be done, then, amidst all these conflicting opinons ? 
Certain it is that we cannot satisfy all. There is one thing which 
it is well to remember — when we hear of remarks made about 
ourselves or what we have clone, not to take them too much 
in earnest, and wonder how and why they were made. Suffice 
it for us to know that our course of action is approved by our 
own judgment, and justified by circumstances of which our 
critics may be unaware. And then, too, a repetition seldom 
detracts from the strength of a statement ; and if it comes from 
a series of mouths, give all the less heed to it. We certainly 
are made no happier for trying to conform our actions to 
gossip, and no one thinks more highly of us for it. Who does 
not admire that person who has a mind of his or her own, and 
acts upon his own convictions of right and wrong ? Such 
: persons have a character of their own, and are not dependent 
upon the opinions of others for support. There will always be 
a class who will lean upon the opinions of others, and are 
continually afraid of offending some one. It is just as well to 
be one of those who control others as one of those controlled. 
There are all sorts of people to deal with in life, and the only 
sure method of dealing with all justly is to know, as did one 
of old, that we have the testimony that it pleaseth God. 



One of our editors, Miss Ella Stocking, recently made a visit 
to the home of her childhood, and spent several clays with her 
parents. 

We congratulate both Miss White and Miss Converse upon 
their lately acquired honor of being senators'' daughters. 

We are happy to inform our readers that Miss Lucy Curtis, 
of Rockland, is again with us, and will be pleased to receive 
her friends at No. 15 South-west Avenue. 

Miss Sadie Ransom expects to return to her home in Penn- 
sylvania to pass the holidays. 

Miss Anna Howe, the distinguished vocalist, has recently 
returned from the Centennial. 

Miss Belle Bragdon has just returned from an extended tour 
through Pennsylvania, and is now charming all hearts at 
Lasell. 



Miss Lizzie Kiser, a rising young artist, is at present engaged 
in copying one of West's finest pictures. We wish her all 
success in her work. 

We deeply sympathize with Miss Perkins in her recent 
bereavement. It was a noble specimen of the feline race. 

The Misses Poote lately changed their residence to No. 24 
Third Hall, where they will be happy to welcome their numer- 
ous acquaintances. 

Mr. John R. Bragdon continues to be as fascinating as ever. 
He is a great favorite with the Seminary girls. 

Miss Whipple made a short visit to Neponset recently, but 
has now returned to our midst. 

Miss Annie Holbrook is continuing her elocution lessons 
under the direction of Prof. Kelly, preparatory to going upon 
the stage. Miss Holbrook has a voice of remarkable power, 
and we have no doubt will succeed in her vocation. 

We understand from good authority that Miss Flint has 
completed a remarkable work of art in the shape of a foot-rest. 
Miss King's foot-rest (modeled after Miss Flint's) is under full 
headway. 

Miss Curry, one of Prof. Kelly's former pupils, has long been 
perfecting herself in a new piece entitled, " Why is the forum 
crowded?" and is now ready to meet any engagements. 
Leave orders at Room No. 8. 

The Senior class at Lasell is reported to be in a very flourishing 
condition. The five young women constituting the class apply 
their minds vigorously to study. We hope they will do credit 
to themselves and their Alma Mater on Commencement day. 

Miss Fanny Thornton recently sustained a severe injury by 
falling. She was confined to her room for several days, but is 
now said to be doing well. 



Se&fflol Mi* 

Far away from home, studying every day 
Rules and propositions, yet we're always gay. 

Rising with the lark, 

Though sometimes in the dark ;' 

Letting down our crimps, squabbling for the glass, 
Making up our beds, to be in time for class; 

For it's against the rule 

To be late at boarding-school. 

First comes number one, where the good Professor 
Teaches Greek and Latin, Cicero and Caesar. 

How we all dread number one! 

Learning Latin is no fun. 

Next we trembling go into number two, 
Knowing there's examples that we cannot do, 

In the lessons for the day ; 

But we soon will clear a way. 

Into number three many do not go, 

As French and German some do not care to know ; 

But in some later day, 

They'll wish to "parle Francaise." 

The last is number four, where " ologies " are taught, 
And many curious things cause wonderment and thought. 

And to keep accounts we're taught, 

Of what is sold and bought. 

After school a walk we take each pleasant day, 

To give us health and strength, and after that we play 

And romp about at will, 

Till the bell bids us be still. 

Studying in the evening until half-past eight, 

Then to the gymnasium to enjoy ourselves first-rate, 

In moving arms and head, 

And then we march to bed. 

This is a sketch of school life — not very good, I fear ; 
But if from a girl you expect anything wonderful to hear, 

You've been disappointed quite. 

Next time I'll do better. Good-night! 





tdttix: iFZEiMiiiKr^. F-A-om. 



Volume II. 



LASELL SEMINARY, JANUARY, 1877. 



Number 2. 



A GREAT BUSINESS. 

The luxury of carpets, though in Eastern life older 
even than houses, is in a comparative novitiate with 
our Western civilization. The latter saw little of it 
until Le Grande, Monarque grafted the Turkish pro- 
duct on French taste; and, as late as the days of Queen 
Mary, Royalty itself did not refuse rush matting. When 
inventive genius, impelled by the first Napoleon, 
brought forth the Jaequard loom, and the workmen of 
Lyons rose to crush the new invader of their indus- 
tries, it was thought that the acme of improvement was 
reached ; but it remained for Yankee ingenuity to give 
its last and mightiest stimulus. 

A half a century ago, a Boston man made an appli- 
cation of the power-loom to ingrain and other carpets, 
which had been despaired of in Europe; and, in a brief 
space, his establishment at Lowell, Mass., turned out 
more work, in less time, and of better quality, than any 
other in the world. Our modern machinery makes now 
a thousand stitches while the nimble fingers of Asiatic 
maidens are making one. The new-born industry 
naturally drew with it trading-houses worthy of its 
magnitude, and one outgrowth In Boston was that of 
John II. Pray, Sons & Co., by far the oldest in New 
England, and one of the largest in America. 

They are the most extensive dealers in Lowell car- 
pets, and have many advantages in being the sole pro- 
prietors of certain patterns. But their trade embraces 
also every variety, foreign as well as home made, and 
extends to every State of the Union. Some idea of it 
may be had from the fact that the wholesale alone 
amounts to a million and a, half annually, and, with the 
retail, over two millions, which is more than all the 
carpet business of Massachusetts when their house was 
founded. 

A visit to their great establishment, 558 and 5(50 
Washington Street, will give some conception of the 
quantity and quality of the goods passing through this 
establishment every year. One secret of the success of 
the house is that the public get the full benefit of its 
experience and immense advantages in purchasing 
stock; and as I. W. Adams, a member of the linn, who 
has made their purchases for twenty years, entirely re- 
lizes "goods well bought are half sold," the benefit 
is a mutual one. 

Here may be had every style and quality, from the 
neat, unpretentious oil cloth, to the luxurious Imperial 
Brussels; the linoleum, soft ami durable; those com- 
pounds of Scotch economy and American skill, ingrains 
of every grade and pattern, the velvety and enticing 
Wilton, fhe rich and tastelul Axminsters, tapestry, in 
workmanship and harmony worthy of the Gobelins. 
cardinal velvets of cruciform design and shades suitable 

for the sanctuary; and all at prices so reasonable that 
the mechanic of to-day may enjoy what the monarch 
of the last century might envy. 

The conscientious purpose of the firm is to give (be 
public nothing but what is trustworthy and fair in 
quality and price. On no other basis could a. business 
continue as this has, for more than half a century, in- 
tact, and, in spile of the fires and financial depressions 
and public and private vicissitudes of two generations, 

constantly increase. 

Their career is like a. grand Turkish carpet, all of a 
piece, with integrity for its central design, and enter- 
prise for its ever-extending border. That the warp of 
their energy and the woof of their Stability may endure 

with interwoven taste and attractiveness, is something 
■which those who admire what is genuine and honest in 
these limes of sham and shoddy, should, by hearty pat- 
ornage, promote. 



M. Alice Linscott. 



Editor — Alice N. Magoun. 

Assistant Editors : 

Clara H. Maltby. 



May S. Gaylord. 



Since our last issue we have entered upon another year — a " New Year" full of 
promise ; and, as we stand on its threshold, it is fitting we should pause to reflect. 

The snow lies white on the world around, and the trees are covered with a strange 
foliage which is not less beautiful than that which crowned them in autumn. Soon 
all this will change, and the green leaves of the spring-time come forth. Then the 
snow will cover the earth again ; but not so do the minutes come back. Time flies 
on swift wings, never to return ; so we must improve the golden moments while 
they are ours. They are given us to improve, to profit by, not to waste. How 
many millions upon millions of minutes have been wasted since time began ! Bow 
many are wasted in every one's lifetime ! Then let us, remembering that time is 
hastening on, return to work after our happ}' and restful vacation, with an earnest 
purpose to improve youth's golden hours. 

We trust that our paper will show the fruits of our earnest labor, and that our 
Leaves, now but in the unfolding of their spring time, shall grow in beauty, an indi- 
cation of the vigorous life of the parent tree. 



Eeveries of a Dime. 

Tin: dime, as it lies worn and battered in the money drawer of the old bakery on 
B Street, falls to thinking in this wise : 

The first Christmas I remember, 1 was taken by a gentleman from a bank, toget 
with many others bright ami new like myself. 1 was given to a petted child, who, 
being charmed by my brightness, thought, instead of spending me for Candy. she 
would put me by as a pocket piece; so I was stored away in a snug corner of her 
purse, where 1 expected to spend the most o( my life. Hut. alas ! my young friend 
had too strong an appetite for candy; consequently 1 was taken from my very 
comfortable resting-place, and, before I realized what was being done, I found my- 
self dropping into the money drawer o( the confectioner who made caramels a 
specialty. While 1 was surveying my new surroundings and breathing out threat- 
enings, I was given in change 1 to a young holy, who slipped me into a very beautiful 
purse. I thought myself quite fortunate, although 1 had very little company. 
Judging from the scarcity of dimes contained in the purse, 1 came to the conclusion 
that 1 was in the hands of a boarding-school girl, and 1 groaned in spirit : for 1 knew 
too well, if this were true, my slay would be transient. 1 remained undisturbed from 
Monday until Friday, when my home was seized and taken a very great distan 
Suddenly 1 heard these startling words : "A dime's worth of peanuts." "Peanuts ! 
1 gasped, but too late ; 1 was already in the store-keeper's hand 

While 1 was wondering where 1 would go next, 1 was given to a small boy for 
the purpose of buying a top. 1 was being taken with great speed to the nearest toy 
store, when the toy-seeker came to a stand-still. A hand was thrust into the pocket 
where 1 was concealed, and 1 was brought to light, when 1 saw a little child b 
ging for a penny that he might buy bread. As 1 was dropped into the little hand. 
purple with cold, 1 thought oi' these words: "Blessed is he that considered the 
poor." 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



f 1@ lissioa if II© Sin.b&ana. 

The sunbeam shines from Heaven 

Upon this world of ours, 
A messenger of gladness 

And light to all the flowers. 
Only a little sunbeam, 

But sent by God above ; 
Only one of many, 

Yet emblem of his love. 

In Heaven they need no sunshine, — 

God's face makes all things bright ; 
On earth we need this shining, 

So sends he beams of light. 
There angels have his smiling, — 

On earth we miss his face ; 
But the message of his kindness 

Lighteth e'en the darkest place. 

And from the shining sunbeam 

We may a lesson learn : 
Seek human hearts to gladden, 

And thus God's praises earn. 
For unto all the nations 

God bids us show our light, — 
That those who sit in darkness 

May wake from error's night. 



Died, at Richmond, Indiana, on the 25th of December, Clara, 
eldest daughter of W. G. Scott, aged twenty years nine months 
and two days. 

With the New Year, comes to us the tidings that one who was 
two years ago one of our number has, on the gladdest day of all 
the year, "gone to keep the Lord's birthday in his own land." 

We who knew her recall her constant earnestness and enthusi- 
asm in her work, her eager interest in all the duties of school life, 
and the bright smile always ready for us her schoolmates, with a 
heartiness of manner peculiarly her own. 

We are deeply glad to recall also the faithful Christian life, the 
pervasive spirit of gentle, unselfish, patient faith always manifest. 

Our sympathies are with the dear sister and parents; for her 
how great and glad the change ! Would that we all were as ready 
here to do with our might that which is given us to do ; as ready 
in spirit to behold "the King in his beauty." 



My Fvrasite leiet. 

When we hear the word hero, how many different ideas are 
presented to our minds. Perhaps our first thought is of the hero 
of the last novel we read ; perhaps it is of those heroes of the olden 
time who performed deeds of valor for their country's sake, and 
in whose names praises will be sung for many generations ; or 
it may be that one own particular hero is the one who occupies 
our thoughts. The heroes of the novels, as we know, are fictitious 
characters, and after a time we regard them as such ; although at 
first they seem very natural to us, and we think with admiration 
of the brave Augustus who plunged into the waves to rescue some 
maiden with golden tresses, eyes like violets, etc., etc. 



And those heroes of ancient times are very pleasant to read or 
dream about. They were brave, and it is right that their names 
should live as long as the sun shall shine. But I think that there 
are many, many heroes whom the world never think of calling by 
that name. In my opinion, every good, true man has at some 
period in his life been a hero. In resisting some temptation, in 
doing some act of kindness to his neighbor, he has performed a 
deed which makes him heroic in the sight of his Maker, if not in 
that of his fellow-men. Such are my favorite heroes. May we 
all be heroes and heroines ; for though our names and fame shall 
perish with us, yet, when we stand before the throne of God, we 
shall know that for some small act of heroism we have been re- 
garded by him with as much favor as have those whose glory is 
known to all the world. 



Is it the prompt attention and obliging disposition of the pro- 
prietor, which attracts the young women to J. W. Davis' dry 
goods store ? 

Now that house-cleaning time is at hand, we hope that all hus- 
bands who desire to please their wives will order one of those 
lovely carpets which Mr. Pray offers to the public. 



BiS, 



The shades of night were falling fast, 

As through the hall there swiftly passed 

One who is known to .us so well, 

And one word from her lips there fell, — Pins. 

Her bi'ow was sad, for well she knew 

What we now know, with sadness too ; 

And as she passed from room to room, 

'Scaped from her lips this word of doom, — Pins. 

As now she opened wide each door, 
She saw a sight ne'er seen before ; 
She looked around, and being alone. 
She gave vent to a fearful groan, — Pins! 

" What's to be done?" she said in woe. 

" All the ' Self-Governed' girls must go 
To a lower place — that's the only way — 
As they forgot what we did say — About Pins." 

So spake the one who has the rule 

Of all the maidens in the school ; 

And as his word is always law, 

The effect of it we very soon saw — Our Pins. 

Then, on the morn of that dread day, 
With tears in his eyes our Professor did say, 
"Young women who did not my order obey 
Will be disgraced from this very day"— By Pins. 

And now, dear friends, you'll remember, I hope, 
To hang all your ornaments up with a rope, 
And never again commit the sin 
Of defacing the wall with a single pin. 






LASELL LEAVES. 



That Jack Frost was King, admitted no question on the evening 
of which I am about to tell you. It was a year ago this Christ- 
mas eve, in a thriving village on the verge of a western prairie. 
The mercury in the little thermometer had been sinking all day. 
I stood by the window, humming a Christmas carol, and trying to 
decide what I should give my motlier and sister Edith for a Christ- 
mas gift. My task was a hard one ; finally I said: "Edith, what do 
you want for Christmas?" "Oh! I'm so glad you asked me, for 
there is just one thing I want. [I knew what "one thing" meant.] 
Ned, have you seen those steel engravings in Mr. Price's, and 
those lovely albums ? I must have that bust of Shakespeare we 
looked at ; and you remember what you promised ?" I had forgot- 
ten, but she quickly reminded me of several promises I had made 
in a time of mental derangement when she had come to the rescue, 
and extracted a needle from the end of my finger. I had attempt- 
ed to push the implement through the eye of a button, aid, in my 
excitement at previous unsuccessful attempts, had inverted the 
needle, with the result above mentioned. 

Then how easy it was to say, "Thanks, little sister ! I will remem- 
ber you when Christmas comes !" 

At last, for fear the little lady would think of more promises I 
had made under similar circumstances, I gave mother a hasty 
kiss, and left the room. As I was putting on my overcoat, I heard 
through the key hole — "Ned, don't forget the engravings and the 
album." I had closed the door quickly, mentally congratulating 
myself on escaping additional reminders. I stopped a moment 
to adjust my cap, when the front door opened, just a crack, and 
Edith, supposing me to be at least half a block away, screamed 
in my ear, " Don't forget what you promised." 

As I hurried along, I began to think of the Christmas eves of 
my life, and how I had spent them ; and it did not seem a great 
while since 1 hung my stocking by the chimney and wrote long 
letters to Santa Claus ; and then I remembered the time when father 
died, and how unhappy I was. All the Christmases after that, I 
was told that Santa Claus had forgotten me, and once that there 
was no Santa Claus ; this hurt me more than all the rest. Oh ! 
how 1 wished I was a big man, and I would turn into Santa Claus 
myself; and I was sure I would not forget one child. 

As 1 thought of these things my heart became very tender, and 
I was trying to remember some one whom I could make happy, 
when suddenly I tripped over something, and just saved myself a 
severe fall, Looking around, I saw two children drawing a little 
wooden box filled with snow. "What are you going to do with 
the snow?" I asked; and while they were explaining how " they 
were going to play it was ice cream," I observed them closely. 
Jim reminded me of the chimney sweeps I used to see in a South- 
ern city. His sister, poor little waif, was wretchedly clad; every- 
thing was clean, but oh ! so little of it. No mittens ! Poor little 
cold hands! 

"So you were going to make icecream out of snow ?" I took the 
cape oil* my overcoat, and, having seated them on my sled, placed 
it around them. 

"Now tell me where you live, and I will take you home." " We 
live around the corner, near the big church." "Do you?" I drew 
them toward the place mentioned. Suddenly the little girl said, 
" We have just come last week, and I don't like it a bit; for 
mother says that Santa Claus does not come to see children 
here, and I do want him to come so much. Where we lived 



before, Aunt Molly, the apple-woman, used to ask him , and he always 
left an apple for us." " What would you like to have Santa Claus 
leave you to-night if he was coming?" I asked. "Oh ! I don't care 
for anything but a regular doll," said the little girl, " I am so tired 
of rags and paper." "Well, Jim, what do you want?" " Just tell 
him to leave me a pair of skates, regular clubs, without no straps* 
all shiny." 

Poor little Jim ! No heels on your shoes, and hardly any toes* 
yet you think you would be perfectly happy if you only had a 
pair of skates. Oh! how many people there are just like you in 
the world. 

" Here we are !" they both shouted, and I stopped in front of such 
a dreary little house — no light in the window to welcome them. I 
waited until they were safely in, and then, promising to deliver their 
message to Santa Claus if he came, I hastened to the business 
part of the village. I have enjoyed many things in life, but noth 
ing more than taking the place of Santa Claus that night. Every- 
thing I thought would be needed was gotten, taking care not to 
forget the " regular doll" and " skates all shiny." I could im- 
agine those happy eyes as they awoke in the morning, and felt 
fully repaid for my trouble. Of course I did not forget the little 
sister at home, and to-day she declares it was the happiest Christ- 
mas in her life. I learned a lesson that night, which I hope will 
last through life : that if we look, we can always find something 
to do that will make those around us happy ; and the best meth- 
od of bringing happiness to ourselves, is to practise the golden 
rule : " Do unto others as you would that others should do unto 
you." 

And as I think of the words of the dear Christ, whose birth-day 
we were just about to celebrate, "Inasmuch as ye have done it 
unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto 
me" — how rich was my Christmas gift, — the knowledge that 
my little act was directed and approved by an All-wise Being. 



AMffi to $M§> 

Be a woman, pure and true, 
Minding not what others say ; 

There is work that you may do, 
If you only find the way. 

Do not wait for others first, — 
For perhaps you'll wait in vain ; 

Boklly overcome the worst, 
Do your best with might and main. 

Never let a scornful word 

Turn you from your chosen path ; 
Never be by toil deterred, 

Nor by others moved to wrath. 

Pity every erring one, — 
Do them all the good you may ; 

Never speak of that in fun 
Which you'll wish you did not say. 

Always keep the golden rule, 
And you will be loved by all ; 

In your home and at your school, 
And whate'er may you befall. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



No one can stay long at Lasell 

And not hear reported the fame 
Of that wonderfully pleasant man, 

William Emerson Baker by name. 

We remember how kindly he wrote, 

Our Principal once to invite, 
" With family, scholastic and marital," 

To visit his Farms— quite a sight. 

But it's not of the nice time that day 
Of which we here wish to speak, 

But of the visit to his Aquarium, 
On the Saturday of last week. 

'Most every one wanted to go ; 

For we'd heard of sea-lions and seals, 
And many queer things they mentioned, 

Not even omitting the eels. 

So we took the half-past one train 

That Saturday afternoon, 
Which brought us to the " Hub," 

And we reached the Aquarium soon. 

The first thing that we noticed, 

As we entered the spacious hall, 
Was the very artistic appearance 

Of the sides of the place and the wall. 

What curious things we saw there, 

We could never begin to say ; 
But those seals and beavers and fishes 

We'll remember for many a day. 

There were two sleepy alligators, 
Whose skins were black and thick ; 

And a festive little musk-rat, 
That would swim when poked with a stick ; 

And a lovely little village, 

With a blacksmith shop and mill, 

Where the trickling of the water 
Made music sweet and still. 

Then Mr. Baker invited us 

Into his other rooms, and there, 
Among the many curious things, 

Was a dog with curly hair. 

Then he gave us each a bottle of cologne, 

To remember him by, you see ; 
And while that lasts we cannot but have 

Sweet remembrances of Mr. B. 

But one among us he much admired; 

So he gave a map to Miss D., 
With the tender and touching sentiment, 

" When yon look at that hog, think of me." 

By this time Professor said we must go, 
Or he feared we'd miss the train ; 

But when we got there, who should meet us, 
But our friend, Mr. Baker, again! 

He kindly fed us with peanuts, 

And gave to each a flower ; 
In fact, did as much for our pleasure 

As could be in any man's power. 

But soon the ride was ended, 

And that pleasant excursion o'er ; 

We're sure we think more of Aquariums 
Than ever we did before. 



Lnliti. 

Average height of " our girls," 
Miss Gaylord, (tallest,) . 
Miss Morgan, (shortest,) 

Only one under 5ft. 



5ft. 3X3 
5" 6| 
4" 11| 



The students of Lasell have a new version of the old rhyme : — 

" It is a sin to steal a pin ; 
But it is a greater to steal a tater." 

For they have found by sad experience that, although 

" 'Tis a sin to steal a pin, 
It is a greater to prick the paper." 

The seat in front of the corner which Zion's Herald occupies 
is seldom vacant. The paper is a favorite with the students. 

The girls search eagerly for the items on Ward No. 4, in the 
Newton Papers, and generally find a pleasant, encouraging word 
for themselves. We hope to be always worthy of the commenda- 
tion we have received from them. 

Lost or stolen, a two-bladed pearl-handled knife ; the finder will 
please deliver it to Mr. Albert Wright, pound master; or will re- 
ceive a suitable reward by returning it to C. Maltby, No. 25 Hall 
Avenue. 

We would respectfully inquire of the Newton Republican how 
long Professor "Killey" has taught elocution at Lasell? Also, 
What are " Lashell Leaves ? " 

New England Conservatory. — This well- known school still 
maintains its high reputation, while it is constantly aiming at a 
higher standard. Lasell's students may well congratulate them- 
selves on their connection with this school. 



" Consider the lilies ! " How often we have heard those words ; 
but did you ever truly reflect on their beauty, and did you see in 
their purity an emblem of the soul after it is purified by the blood 
of its Kedeemer ? The scarlet stains of sin, washed in the stream 
of salvation, become white as snow. Then shall we be as the 
" Light of the World," like the lily of the valley, pure and 
spotless. 



We invite the attention of our readers to the fact that J. H. 
Chadwick, who advertises white lead and lead pipe, is making 
great preparations at his factory in the Highlands for the manu- 
facture of a new pigment for painting. Take notice, all you who 
propose to newly paint your houses this spring, and remember 
that by using this article you will save much expense. 

If any rising young artists are in need of materials, we should 
advise them to visit Frost & Adams, who, we are sure, will receive 
them with their usual politeness. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



5 



Bell @f toll 

A stands for Alderman, 

Of players the best ; 
And, having mentioned her, 

We'll proceed to the rest. 

B stands for Bacon, 

A daring brunette; 
She wears her hair 

In " curlicues " yet. 

C stands for Curry, 

Of walkers the chief; 
She'll walk past Boston next time, 

If she only gets leave. 

D stands for Dunsmore, 
Who hails from the West; 

Among Lasell's finest voices, 
Hers ranks with the best. 

E stands for Ellis ; 

She's young and petite, — 
From the crown of her head 

To the soles of her feet. 

F stands for Ferguson, 

Another one small ; 
But, if she lives long enough, 

She may grow tall. 

G stands for Gay lord; 

Her nature is calm ; 
She'd not be disturbed 

By the fiercest alarm. 

H stands for Holbrook, 

Who has just changed her room; 
We hope peace and happiness 

To her dwelling may come. 

K stands for Kaiser, 

Who skateth so well; 
She cannot be beaten 

By any girl at Lasell. 

L stands for Linscott, 

Who leadeth us all 
When marching we go 

Through Gymnasium Hall. 

M stands for Morgan, 

Who amuses us well 
By her comical ways 

And the tales she can tell. 

P stands for Perkins, 

Who's blessed with chums three; 
And it is to be hoped 

That the four will agree. 

R stands for Ransom, 
From the Keystone State ; 

As we very well know, 
She's a maiden sedate. 

S stands for Sabins, 
From Indiana they come; 

We trust they're not lonely 
So far from their home. 



T stands for Thornton, 
Both Fannie and E. ; 

May they ever, as now, 
Like sisters agree. 

W stands for Williams, 

The gayest of all ; 
They've enlivened Lasell 

Since the beginning of fall. 

Y stands for Young, 
Who'll finish the list; 

As this ends our alphabet, 
We'll from writing desist. 



Pttmnalii 

We are delighted to see once more among us the beaming face 
of Miss Alderman, after her temporary absence. 

Miss Cutler has retired to the "bosom of her family," to stay 
until Monday. 

Our honorary ring is now complete. The King was the last to 
come. What other school can boast of a King, an Alderman, and 
a Kaiser ? 

For the hardest thing at Lasell, see (0.) Flint. 

Persons desiring to know "why the Forum is crowded," may 
be interested to know that Miss Curry has moved from No. 8 
" Happy Hall," to the " big room " higher up. 

Why should the height of success be easily reached by any 
vocal pupil at Lasell ? Because she has some one to Wheel'er 
there. 

We are glad to see among us two new faces. We gave them a 
warm welcome, but hope it did not burn'em (Burnham). 

Wk all regret to hear that our " Darling" is ill, and hope that 
our classic halls will soon again re-echo to the sound of her foot- 
steps. 

Why should Lasell never suffer from drought ? Because there 
is a whole brook (Holbrook) on the second floor. 

We are glad to have Miss Clark among us again, but are sorry 
that she brought back with her a severe cold instead of her hearing. 

It is pleasant for us to know that two of our young women who 
are now at the Boston University, one of whom entered last fall and 
one the preceding year, are ranked among the best students in 
the university, having passed a very thorough examination on their 
entrance. 

Although we miss them from among our number, still we take 
pride in their success, which, we think, goes far towards the proof 
of our motto. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



On Wednesday, December 13th, the young women of Lasell 
planted a Centennial Tree. They assembled in the Chapel at 
3 o'clock, and, after singing "Hail Columbia," listened to the 
following dedicatory address by Annie White, of Brockton, 
Mass. : 

DEDICATION. 

On this 100th year of our country's life, we, the teachers and 
pupils of Lasell Seminary, plant this tree. Long may it wave, 
and may its shadow never be less ! 

We set apart to its use so much of earth, sun, air, and rain as 
may be necessary for its comfort and prosperity (provided we own 
so much of them). 

The tree itself, in its tender years, we dedicate in particular 
to ourselves and to those who shall fill our places here ; in general, 
to the cause of uprightness throughout the land. 

We shall watch with great interest and anxiety to see whether 
it fulfills its promise of life, and unfolds its buds in the spring. 

May it not leave us, but abide ; while it has not yet the strength 
to brave the storm, may it have the wisdom to bow before it. 

May it aspire to be a great tree ; a bright, particular star in 
earth's firmament. 

We have faith sufficient to believe that the day will come when 
one can say of it : 

" This mighty tree — 
By whose immovable stem I stand and seem 
Almost annihilated, — not a prince 
In all that proud Old World beyond the deep 
E'er wore his crown so loftily as he 
Wears the green coronal of leaves with which 
Nature's hand has graced him." 

May the birds of the air come and lodge in its branches ; only 
do not let them tell tales out of school which shall bring us into 
trouble with our teacher. 

So will we always say and sing, "Woodman, spare that tree." 
So will we ever cherish it as our own vine and fig-tree. 

If, on the next Centennial, any of us who are present to-day 
shall happen this way, we bespeak for each the privilege of sitting 
under its shade to recall and recount the pleasant memories of 
by-gone days, and to devise plans for the future. 

Then, when old age shall have finally crept upon us, its wide- 
spreading branches shall still whisper to us of " Auld Lang Syne ; " 
still bring to our mind pictures of the past, among which the 
scenes of this hour will be one of the brightest and freshest. 

Teachers and members of Lasell, I introduce to you our Cen- 
tennial Tree. All hail, and farewell till next spring. 

A procession was then formed, and the students, led by the 
Faculty, moved to the lawn, and there, round the tree, sang the 
ode written for the occasion, by Florence Moulton, of Boston : 

OX)E. 

With joy this tree we've planted; 

We pray it may survive 
The chilling blasts of winter. 

Long may it live and thrive! 

Years upon years have vanished 

Since our forefathers came 
The broad Atlantic over, 

With liberty their aim. 



A century has left us 

Since we've been wholly free ; 
To-day we celebrate it 

By setting out this tree. 

Although it yet is youthful, 

'Twill grow with kindly aid; 
Ere long we'll rest beneath it, — 

Enjoy its welcome shade. 

And at the next Centennial, 

When we are gone from here, 
We hope some one will tend it, — 

Will guard our emblem dear. 

So thus we dedicate it 

Forever to Lasell ; 
Then to our cherished country, 

And all who wish us well. 

Now let us join in chorus 

To praise the One above, 
Who gave us independence 

And everlasting love. 

After the planting, each in solemn procession putting in her 
shovelful of earth, the procession returned to the chapel, when 
the following oration was read by Alice Magoun, of Bath, Me. 

(the oration will be published in our next.) 



We assure our readers who are about to purchase new furniture 
that they will experience nothing but pleasure in visiting Paine's 
establishment. 

Young women ! Call at Stocking & Austin's and have your 
lives insured, and thus increase your market value. 

We are glad to see that others are to have in the " Folio" the 
benefit of Prof. Wheeler's papers on Voice Physiology, which 
have proved so profitable to the vocalists at Lasell. White, 
Smith & Perry publish the " Folio." 



(ESTABLISHED 1847.) 

AARON R. GAY & CO., 

130 STATE STREET, BOSTON, 

stationers and Blank Book Manufacturers, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

THOMAS D. COOK, 



AGENT FOR THE 



NEW ENGLAND ICE CREAM CO. 



ATIRES, 

No. 8 PROVINCE COURT, BOSTON. 

Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at very Reasonable Rates.. 
Wedding and other Parties served with care and promptness. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



NEW DRUG STORE 



The subscribers would inform the residents of Au- 
burndale and vicinity that they have opened a 

DRUG STORE, 

In the new building adjoining their Grocery store, on 
Auburn Street, facing Grove, and will keep on hand 
a Fresh Stock of 
PURE DRUGS, 
CHEMICALS, 

PATENT MEDICINES, 

TOILET ARTICLES, &c. 

This Department is under the management of 
MR. BRUSH, an apothecary of large experience. 
Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed at all 
hours, from purest and best drugs. 

J\. VIOKERS &c CO., 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



ABEAM FRENCH & CO. 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods 
and Plated Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET. 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. Wells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
Wm. A. French. 
S. Waldo French. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Mills* liiiilil 



NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON 



EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. 
r. Eager, of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of 

The " Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., 



jggtr 



® 



THE BEST PLACE 



TO BUY 



FURNITURE 



IS AT 



PAINS'S MANUFACTORY, 



48 GJ^ISTJ^Xj street, 



BOSTON. 



COLLIER & PERKINS, 

Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

ENGRAVINGS, CHROMOS, 

Frames, Stereoscopes and Views, 

VELVET FKAMES & PASSEPARTOUTS, 

IMI OXJ3L.3DI3STOS, 

And every Article desired by the Picture Dealer and 
Frame Maker. 

361 WASHINGTON STREET, 

3 Doors North of Bromfield St. BOSTON. 

PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STOUE, 

AUBURNDALE, 
MASS. 



THE 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and SALT' 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

4®~ Goods delivered free of charge. 



J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH, AND 162 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, 

AND 

Auburn Streat, Auburndale, 



DEALERS IN 



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NEW-YORK 

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WILLIAM H. BEEKS, 
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Established 1845 Purely Mutual 



MORRIS FRANKLIN, 

President. 



ASSETS, $35,000,000.00 



BOSTON BRANCH OFFICE: 

Congress Building, 4 Post-Office Square, 
STOCKING & AUSTIN, Managers. 

JAMES W. KIDNEY, 



^J^^tf I 



Mechanics' Exchange, 33 & 35 Hawley St. 



Order Box 294. 



BOSTON. 



Edge-Stones Set; Streets, Places, Private 

Avenues, and all kinds of Plain and 

Fancy Paving done promptly. 

EVERY VARIETY CF PAVING MATERIALS FURNISHED, IF DESIRED, 

Attention given to the building of Bailroad Tracks, 

4®~Mr. Kidney can be found at the Exchange, between 
the hours of 12 and 1. 

$100 SAVED is $ioo EARNED 

The above amount can be SAVED BY EVERY 
family in one YEAH, by purchasing their gro- 
ceries at the mammoth store of 

C I>. COBB «fc B«OTHEK8, 

722, 726 and 728 Washington St. 

For the past thirty years our motto has been 
large SALES ano small PROFITS, and our con- 
stantly increasing trade is sufficient guarantee 
that our efforts in that line have proved a success. 

Examine our Prices. What $1.00. Will Buy ! 

3 Pounds Prime Oolong Tea, $1 00 

11 " French Breakfast Coffee, ... 1 00 

10 " Corn Starch 1 00 

10 " Silver Gloss Starch 1 00 

12 " Flake Tapioca 1 00 

10 " Pearl Tapioca 1 00 

10 " Pearl Sago, l 00 

20 " Canada Oat Meal l 00 

25 " Fresh Hominy l 00 

25 " Samp 1 00 

17 " Prime Carolina Rice 1 00 

40 " Yellow bolted Meal 1 00 

14 " Choice Dried Apples 1 oo 

15 " Choice Prunes l 00 

13 Quarts Best Medium Beans, 1 00 

10 " Best Pea Beans, 1 00 

10 " Split Pkas, 1 00 

25 Pounds Prime Popping Corn 1 00 

12 Tumblers pure Fruit Jellies, ..... l 00 

5 2 1 ; lb. Bars Arnold's Standard Extra 

Soap, 1 00 

5 2V> lb. Bars Curtis Davis - Extra Soap, . 1 00 

10 Bars American Peerless Soap 1 00 

14 Bars Babbitt's Best Soap, 1 00 

10 Bars Babbitt's N. Y. City Soap, .... 1 00 

10 Cakes Imported Castile Soap 1 00 

Don't fail to give us a call before purchasing. 
All goods packed in strong cases and delivered 

FREE 100 MILES. 

Call and get, or send for, catalogue of goods 
with prices, which will give full particulars. 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

PRINCIPAL WAREHOUSE, 

Nos. 722, 726 $t 728 Washington St., Boston. 

BRANCH STORES: 140 Hanover, cor. Union St., Boston. 

1311 and 1313 Washington Street, Boston. 2235 

Washington St., Boston. Cor Main & 

MilkSts., Westboro*. 148 & W! 

Main St., Fiichburg. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

T^ILO R 9 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer St. BOSTON". 

PRIWTI1V« OFFICE, &c, FOR SALE. 
Printing Office, Novelty Octavo Press, 25 fonts stand- 
ard new styles of type, etc. Price $75 cash, worth double. 
tienuiue Confederate SSIOOO Bonds and Con- 
federate Bills, and Old Coins cheap. A note for $100 
25 cents. 
Scroll and visiting cards, any style, 25 cents per pack. 

ERNKST K. PACKARD, So. Boston, Mass. 

WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington street, Boston, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 
and Piano Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation Books, the ' New 
Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Montnly, only $1.60 a year. 

"W. H. FRENCH &c CO. 
Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



DR. A. W. WHITNEY, 

WEST EffJETATTOrT. 



"CARRIAGES. 33 

We have, a large stock of seasonable and 

FAMILY CAFiJFiSAGrES 

AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

112 SUDBURY ST., BOSTON. 

F. E. CROCKETT, M. D, 

HQMEOPATHIST, 
Eesidence, Washington Street, opp, Elm Street, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



Office hours, before 8-J A.M., 1-3 and 7-8 P.M. 

nxrioTrioiLjS d£ tt^iljILj, 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - ' - - BOSTON. 
URATITSTG- BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

M I 3L, K 5 

Citizens of Anburndale and vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

1*. O. Address, AnbnrndaU, 

WATERS & IKTMAST, 

west asr as -w to isr _A.:isr -n> aubtjendale, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE, 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 

night. 

GEO. W. DEAN & CO., 

f o>roip frails § 1Pro<lu(@@ 9 

13 & 15 Merchants Row, 
BOSTON. 



JOHN HANCOCK 
]\lutucil L(ife Ii\^ut x kr\de Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Has Accumulated Assets Exceeding $2,650,000. 



GEORGE THORNTON, President. 

GEO. B. WOODWARD, ........ Secretary 

CHARLES G. WOOD, Treasurer 

SAMUEL ATHERTON Vice-President 

J. C. WHITE Medical Examiner 

SAMUEL WELLS, Counsel 

FRANK M. HAYDEN, . . . . Supervisor of Agents 

BOS^POH 2UGAB CO* 

(Incorporated iix 1829.) 

J. H. CHAD WICK & CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVEK STfiEET, BOSTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Mmtm fte© »Mte &md), 

DRY AND GROUND IN OIL. 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure White Lead,both dry and ground in oil, we war- 
rant to be STRICTLY PUR E, and guarantee that for Fine- 
ness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any Lead 
in the market, either foreign or American. 

Turin order to protect ourselves we have adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in the centre. This is on every package of 
our PUKE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

HALLET, DAYIS & CO. 

"PLACED AT THE BUD." 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CENTEMKiAL EXPOSITION 
Awarded our Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURING- PERMANENCE OF TONE, 

Warerooms, 484 Washington Street, BOSTON, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue Free. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AX WHOLESALE A1VJD KETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWQRTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Pairitery 0upplie£, fSfti^ts" Materials', 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FRANK E. PORTER, M. D. 

ttpiiiw ■§ Surgeon, 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases, and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street, Anburndale. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO. 

DEALERS in 

FOKEIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

Nats, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &e. 
1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. ER \NK E. RICHARDSON 

FRANK W OOD, 

382 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bromfield Street, BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School •work. 

JOEL 6CLDTHWAIT & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CAEPETING-S, 

tfos. 167 and 169 Washington Street, 
BOSTON, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT, 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



OLIVER DSTSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Sheet Music and Music Books, 

Pianos, Organs and Melodeons, 

451 WASHIN GTON STREET, BOSTON 

NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, 
16,000 Pupils since 1S67. 50 eminent Professors. Best 
Methods. 115 hours for $15.00. 

THE NORMAL INSTITUTE, 
A sea-side summer school, course elective. 70 Lecturers 
and Professors. Literary and Musical departments. 

Ad ress, E. Totjrjee, Music Hall, Boston. 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 

Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

j-. KLnsro"wx_iE]s eg? ©oirxrs, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

CXj^^S, OTSTEES <2a scollops, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 & 123 Faneuil Hall Market, ... - BOSTON. 

J. Knowles. R. H. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 

"swan^newtonT 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, dec. 

No. IS Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN, BOSTOIV. 
S. B. NEWTON. 

■w\' r>_ LATHROP, 

AtTBlJRlVDATiE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding 1 Stable. 

Also, Auburndale & Boston Express. 





IDTXIXl FEMINA 



Volume II. 



LASELL SEMINARY, MARCH, 1877. 



Number 3. 



A GREAT BUSINESS. 

The luxury of carpets, though in Eastern life older 
even than houses, is in a comparative novitiate with 
our Western civilization. The latter saw little of it 
until Le Grande Monarque grafted the Turkish pro- 
duct on French taste; and, as lau: as the days of Queen 
Mary, Royally itself did not refuse rush matting. Wtnm 
inventive genius, impelled by the first Napoleon, 
brought forth the Jacqnard loom, and the workmen of 
Lyons rose to crush the new invader of their indus- 
tries, it was thought that the acme of improvement was 
reached; but it remained for Yankee ingenuity to give 
its last and mightiest stimulus. 

A half a century ago, a Boston man made an appli- 
cation of the power-loom to ingrain and other carpets, 
which had been despaired of in Europe; and, in a brief 
space, his establishment at Lowell, Mass., turned out 
more work, in less time, and of better quality, than any 
other in the world. Our modern machinery makes now 
a thousand stitches while the nimble fingers of Asiatic 
maidens are making one. The new-born industry 
naturally drew with it trading-houses worthy of its 
magnitude, and one outgrowth in Boston was that of 
John H. Pray, Sons & Co., by far the oldest in New 
England, and one of the largest in America. 

They are the most extensive dealers in Lowell car- 
pets, and have many advantages in being the sole pro- 
prietors of certain patterns. But their trade embraces 
also every variety, foreign as well as home-made, and 
extends to every State of the Union. Some idea of it 
may be had from the fact that the wholesale alone 
amounts to a million and a half annually, and, with the 
retail, over two millions, which is more than all the 
carpet business of Massachusetts when their house was 
founded. 

A visit to their great establishment, 558 and 560 
Washington Street, will give some conception of the 
quantity and quality of the goods passing through this 
establishment every year. One secret of the success of 
the house is that the public get the full benefit ofits 
experience and immense advantages in purchasing 
stock; and as I. W. Adams, a member of the firm, who 
has made their purchases for twenty years, entirely re- 
lizes "goods well bought are half sold," the benefit 
is a mutual one. 

Here may be had every style and quality, from the 
neat, unpretentious oil cioth, to the luxurious Imperial 
Brussels; the linoleum, soft and durable; those com- 
pounds of Scotch economy and American skill, ingrains 
of every grade and pattern, the velvety and enticing 
Wilton, the rich and tastelul Axminsters, tapestry, in 
workmanship and harmony worthy of the Gobelins, 
cardinal velvets of cruciform design and shades suitable 
for the sanctuary; and all at prices so reasonable that 
the mechanic of to-day may enjoy what the monarch 
of the last century might envy. 

The conscientious purpose of the firm is to give the 
public nothing but what is trustworthy and fan- in 
quality and price. On no other basis could a business 
continue as this lias, for more than half a century, in- 
tact, and. in spite of the fires and financial depressions 
and public and private vicissitudes of two generations, 
constantly increase. „ , . , n r 

Their career is like a grand Turkish carpet, all of a 
piece, with integrity for its central design, and enter- 
prise for its ever-extending border. That the warp of 
their energy and the woof of their stability may endure 
with interwoven taste and attractiveness, is something 
which those who admire what is genuine and honest in 
these times of sham and shoddy, should, by hearty pat- 
ronage, promote. 



Lizzie Kiser. 



Editor — N. Grace Perkins. 

Assistant Editors : 

Hattie Clark. 



Anna Curry. 



Spring has come at last, and with it our third paper for the year. The leaves 
have, so far, kept pace with the seasons ; for it was last November when our first 
paper, which met with such success, was published. Then, in the cold month of 
January, when everything was covered with its mantle of snow, our second num- 
ber appeared. This, containing as it did such a full account of the "Tree Plant- 
ing," was as welcome to the many friends of Lasell as the first. And now that 
the beautiful Spring, for which we have been looking so long, has come, this one 
is issued. The winter, although so cold and disagreeable, has passed rapidly and 
pleasantl}*" with us, and those who know this is the last year of their school life 
have a kind of regret in the thought of leaving all they have enjoyed. We fancied 
when Spring came, it would be all that we could desire ; but now it is here, we are 
looking forward to the time when school will close, and we shall return to our 
homes. Meantime, may success attend all our efforts, especially those designed to 
render our "Leaves" worthy of approval. 



Sitting 1st a PMii& 

If there is anything in the world that requires patience and courage, I think it is 
to sit for one's picture. How well I remember my last trial in that direction ! I 
was one day suddenly possessed with the idea that, if I should die, my friends 
would have no likeness of me taken near the time of my decease ; so, after making 
my engagement with the photographer, who assured me he could take a most 
charming picture, in due time I went to fulfil my engagement. The day was 
rather warm ; so, when I reached the rooms, which, in accordance with the custom 
of photographers, were situated in the seventh story, my hair did not have the 
amount of curl and crimp which was expected, after having been screwed up in 
curl papers and crimping pins for two days and nights. But, after many struggles 
with hairpins, I sat down to await my turn. The photographer— poor man ! — was 
nearly frantic in his endeavors to obtain the likeness of an infant, who was at- 
tended by its mother, two maiden aunts and a brother, who, being of an inquisitive 
nature, wished to know what I was going to have my picture taken for, and when 
I was o-oing to sit for it, &c, &c. The process of taking the picture was consid- 
erably delayed by the time employed by the family in trying to make the child 
smile, and after a while, Baby decided to cry instead, so set up a most heart-rend- 
ing shriek ; upon which, the mother started off, declaring that the photographer 
knew nothing whatever about the management of children ; while he, with a sigh 
of relief, turned to the next applicants. They were a young married couple, 
evidently from the rural district, who, after many questions as to which cost the 
most, to have their pictures taken singly or in a group, finally managed to obtain a 
likeness which pleased them ; although the operation was attended with much diffi- 
culty, on account of the young woman's fear that the instrument would explode. 
As they passed out, with the feeling of a martyr I took my place in the chair. 
When the photographer told me to look at a certain crack in the wall, 1 felt a desire to 



LASELL LEAVES, 



lauo'h, so probably looked more serious than I intended ; for when 
I saw the negative, it looked as if I were angry, and my head 
being supported by my hand, gave me the appearance of tearing my 
hair in a most insane manner. I sat four times, and what pic- 
tures ! Once a fly came buzzing along, and perched on my nose. 
The next time he kept flying above my head, so 1 raised my eyes. 
In that picture, I looked as if I had not a remaining hope in life. 
Becoming somewhat discouraged, I decided not to try again, and 
ordered some to be finished. When they came home, my mother 
remarked that, as the baby did not care for pictures, she thought 
they would be of but little service ; so 1 ruthlessly committed 
them to the flames, declaring that sitting for a picture was no 
joke. 



Wiltlig fsss fe§ Pager. 



" Will you write for the paper? " our editor said; 
And her voice in accents fell 
On the ear of one so unlearned as myself 
Like the tones of a solemn bell. 

But down I sat, with pen in hand, 

To knit my brows, and think; 
Though all I could do, for a long, long time, 

Was to dip my pen in the ink. 

What should I write? rhyme or reason? 

What under the sun should it be? 
That it wouldn't be either the first or the last 

Soon became very plain to me. 

Now, if I only conld write a ghost story 

Of a spook in a haunted house; 
How the folks heard such a terrible noise. 

And yet it was only a mouse ; 

Or perhaps I might write a story of love- 
That will please school-girls, I know ; 

But the more I thought it over, 
That love-story wouldn't go. 

I corddn't describe my blonde maiden, 

With her floating golden hair; 
Nor arrange to my satisfaction 

The warrior who loved " the maid fair." 

And then I tried to write " personals," 

They always take so well :— 
But somehow there had nothing 

Been left for me to tell. 

We did have a lovely sleigh-ride— 
I might describe that, next I thought ; 

But I never was good at description, 
And so that plan went for naught. 

Oh! this writing for the paper 

Is worse than essays, by far ; 
And you, my friends and schoolmates, 

Have experienced what "essays" are. 

But after all my thinking and planning, 
No thoughts to my mind could I call ; 

So I ended by tearing the paper, 
And writing nothing at all. 



The Juniors are at present in a state of great excitement, ow- 
ing to the fact that they soon must appear in public on the stage. 
Their appearance will undoubtedly be a great success ; indeed, it 
is rumored that one essay will abound with the eloquence of an 
"Emerson." 



We move that some of the girls ask some of the other girls to 
ask Sadie to ask Mrs. Bragdon to ask Mr. Bragdon to hurry up and 
answer our petition. Perhaps, however, feeling the great respon. 
sibility of answering so momentous a question, he will present the 
matter to Congress while he is in Washington. 



An interesting book may always be found at the store of 
Nichols & Hall. See advertisement in another column. 



Tell me not in mournful measures, 

Life is but an empty show; 
When such real and countless treasures 

You can buy of French & Co. 

Thousands have insured their lives in the John Hancock Life 
Insurance Co., and lived happy ever after. Go thou and do like- 
wise ! 



Jack and Gill went up the hill, 

To fetch a pail of water ; 
Jack fell down and broke his crown, 

And Gill came tumbling after. 

To the lovers of the condensed style, what a noble specimen is 
herein contained. No long, dreary introduction, no beating about 
the bush, but a plunge like a dip into a sea-bath, and we are at 
once in the midst of our story, and feel as well acquainted with 
the dramatic persons of this famous epic as though we had known 
them all our lives. A critic, speaking of Campbell's well-known 
battle description : 

"By torch and trumpet fast arrayed, 
Each foeman drew his battle blade," 

is very much delighted at the celerity with which the poet gets 
his horseman into the saddle ; but our author, whoever he may be, 
is equally happy in this respect. Like many other great works of 
art, this poem is not so much noted for what it describes, as what 
it suggests, and here lies the secret of all great efforts. What a 
noble originality in our author, to sketch upon the canvas Jack 
and Gill, a pail, a hill, and some water ; leaving the fertile mind 
of the reader to fill in the details of the picture to suit himself. 

I am not certain whether Gill belonged to the sterner or to the 
gentler sex ; but having heard that "Every Jack must have his 
Gill," and having seen a spirited painting in a nursery rhyme- 
book, of Jack, and his attendant Gill represented as a female, I 
will admit that Gill was of that lovely sex. But I assume they 
were lovers, or, if married, only in their honeymoon ; for, at 
what other time do you see man and wife go together to get a 
pail of water ? No ; generally the woman has to go, while the 
man sits on the fence and talks politics, or is seen loafing around 
the corner grocery, with a nasty old "pipe or cigar in his mouth. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Another part of our story will admit of much discussion ; we 
allude to that part which represents them as going up the hill. I 
think that here is a mistake, as I feel quite sure wells and springs 
are not found on hills, but in vales ; yet we will let this pass as of 
not much moment, and attribute it to poets' license. Passing on 
to the tragic end of our story, — Jack fell down ; and now 
we are stopped by the question, How came he to fall 1 
Did he slip or did he stub his toe ? or had he been " put- 
ting an enemy into his mouth, to steal away his brains?" 
On this point our poet is silent, and we are thrown upon our own 
resources to fill up the picture ; at any rate, we know that he fell 
down, and so have many great men before him. Adam fell, so did 
Warren at Bunker hill ; not, however, from the top of the monu- 
ment, as some people might suppose. So did Napoleon, and hosts 
of others too numerous to mention. — And broke his crown. — Now 
the question is, what was his crown ? Was he a king ? Oh, no ! 
kings never carry pails of water. Perhaps he had a crown-piece 
in his pocket, which fell out and was lost, and Jack, to use a 
slang term, was broke. No, I don't think that will do ; for as 
Napoleon uses the word crown in manj' places to designate the 
head, we will assume that he broke his head. Now, then, for poor 
little Gill. She, like a true-hearted woman as she was, her heart 
bursting with grief, tumbles after Jack in a manner which chal- 
lenges our admiration and applause ; in fact, if we saw it enacted 
on the stage, we should be inclined to cry "encore." 

Much more might be said on the subject, about the funeral ob- 
sequies of the Abelard and Heloise of nursery fame, but enough ; 
we are glad to know that it can be said that, as "they were 
lovely in life, so in death they were not divided." 



la 0it Bt 



uoom,. 



The Watchman and Reflector is eagerly read by the students, 
particularly when it contains any kind word in our behalf. 

Through our welcome daily visitor, the Transcript, we obtain 
our knowledge of the busy world around us. 

So great, is the demand for the Art Journal, that good-natured 
girls become impatient in waiting for the first glimpse. 

We like the Nation as a specimen of style, (we like the pictures 
in Harper's better,) but should enjoy reading it better if its neu- 
trality did not lean so much to the Democratic side. 



Although 0. Ditson & Co. have such a wide reputation that 
they hardly need a word from us ; still, we would recommend our 
musical friends to call on them, at 451 Washington St., Boston. 

Mr. C. S. Bird, druggist, has in his store at Auburndale a 
remedy for every ill that flesh is heir to. 

If you do not know how much a frame will improre a picture, 
you had better select one at the store of Collier & Perkins, and 
find out. 



It was truly touching to see the fortitude with which the ma- 
jority of the students bore 1he omission of Dr. Monroe's lecture 
yesterday. 



Miss Ransom does the honors of the Principal's table very 
nicely in his absence. 



We are glad to see that Professor Kelley is improving in his 
manner of calling the roll. 



Lait funis 

Fivk little democrats, 

All in a row ; 
Knew Tilden 'd be elected sure- 

At least, they all said so. 



Five little democrats 

Looking now-a-days 
As if they hadn't a hope in life, 

Because our President's Hayes. 



fit© l|nif"i DaigMi^ 

'Tis a pleasant morn in August, 
And through the meadows fair 

Trips a gentle little maiden, 
With sunny, golden hair. 

There are flowers all around her — 

Roses and violets small ; 
But she is the fairest flower 

That blooms among them all. 

Her father is a miner — 
Gold nuggets he has found ; 

And through the quiet village 
His fame has spread around. 

That father now is toiling 
In the hidden spot where he 

Has found rich treasures coming 
To crown his industry. 

Daily the little maiden 
Brings luncheon to him here; 

And with her merry laughter 
His lonely heart doth cheer. 

Passing swiftly through the meadows, 
She climbs a mountain near, 

With footsteps light and airy, 
And heart that knows no fear. 

She turns a corner in the path- 
Then starts back with a cry ; 

Three men, with faces dark and fierce, 
Appear before her eye. 

They drag the terror-stricken maid 

Along the path, and show 
Her where the dark rocks tower 

Above a stream below. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Then, grasping tight her little arm, 

The eldest of the three 
Exclaims, " Do as we bid yon, child, 

And you shall then be free! 

" Now lead us to your father, 

And we will let you go. 
If you refuse," he sternly ci'ies, 

" We'll drop you clown below." 

She looks beneath — 'tis wild and dark — 
Then clasps her hands on high; 

And in a trembling voice she moans, 
"I can't— I'd rather die!" 

A frightened scream ! — the men bend down, 

And fairly hold their breath ; 
A far-off sound of the water's splash, 

And silence as of death ! 

All alone, the anguished father 

Watches eagerly, day by day, 
For a sight of the little maiden 

Who made his home so gay. 

But her gentle feet now travel 

The banks of a happier shore; 
Where at last the loving father 

Shall meet*his child once more. 



Vickers & Co. offer a great variety in the shape of drugs and 
groceries, and we expect their counters will be crowded with 
purchasers. 

Now that leap-year is past, those unfortunate bachelors who 
waited in vain for an offer will feel the need of visiting C. A. T. 
Bloom's establishment, where they will find the latest styles for 
spring suits. 



We have enjoyed a rare treat lately, in the way of lectures, by 
Mr. J. L. Stoddard, on European cities. The course consisted of 
ten lectures, and the charm increased with each successive visit 
that we made with Mr. Stoddard as our guide ; first to Paris, then 
on to Milan, Venice, Florence, Rome; lastly, ending our travels 
with a glimpse of Naples and Pompeii. Mr. Stoddard's talks are 
instances of the most vivid word-painting. The life-like descrip- 
tions he gave of palaces, cathedrals, noted groups of sculpture, 
and celebrated paintings, scarcel}" needed the aid of the numerous 
photographs that were used in illustrating, to bring them more 
fully to our view. 

Aside from the general culture to be derived from such a course 
of lectures, they were a most excellent preparation for foreign 
travelling ; pointing out, as they did, the main points of interest, 
while the scraps of history or legends connected with many of 
the works of art added greatly to the interest. Among his many 
descriptions, that of the famous Duomo was noticeable, and his 
artistic analysis of Da Vinci's "Last Supper," with his character 
study of Da Vinci himself, were each worth fourfold the cost of 
the entire course. All things considered, if we cannot travel 
through foreign lands in reality, the next best thing is to visit 
them in imagination, with Mr. Stoddard as our cicerone. 



Am A&TCi-tUesieiit. 

About the school at Auburndale, — 
The haunt of rhyme and reason, — 

If you would learn important facts, 
My testimony seize on. 

For here we dwell, some sixty girls, 

In harmony together ; 
Protected well, at old Lasell, 

From every kind of weather. 

Of mornings we are up betimes, 
Nor dawdle at our dressing; 

Not one of us would be behind 
For breakfast or for blessing. 

Our compositions, all are sure, 

Are worthy of the sages ; 
Our only wonder, they can be 

Kept out of printed pages. 

What we don't know of foreign lands, 

Geography can't tell us; 
And our research in history 

Would make a Bancroft jealous. 

Geology and rhetoric 

Absorb our learned leisure; 
And French and German, if you please, 

We study for our pleasure. 

We try to rival with our songs 
The wild birds round us singing; 

Could any one the difference tell, 
Who heard our discords ringing? 

With organ and piano-forte 

We supplement our voices ; 
But when the music lesson's done, 

Each one of us rejoices. 

Philosophers and lecturers 

From outside come to teach us ; 
No words of wisdom anywhere, 

But find a way to reach us. 

i 
Onward, still onward, is our aim ; 

Eepulsce ncscia 's our seal ; 
Daily one and all are striving 

For our good, with steadfast zeal. 

Such are the charms of old Lasell ; 

And such the good we gain there; 
Long may it stand upon its hill, 

And Mr. Brandon reign there. 



"Are the children safe?" asks the Christian Union. Quite 
safe, we assure you. They are up in the garret, playing hotel 
fire. Jimmie is the clerk, and is trying to slide down the water- 
pipe to the ground. Willie is a guest, hanging to the window- 
sill, and waiting for the flames to reach his hand before he tries to 
drop to the shed roof, two stories below; and Tom is an heroic 
fireman, and has tied his fishing line round the baby's body and 
is letting it down to the ground. Oh yes, the children are all 
right; just finish your call, and don't fret about the children.— Bur- 
lington Hawkeye. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Tf-ii Planting at LantlL 

(CONTINUED FROM OUR LAST.) 
ORATION. 

I could best express my sentiments on this occasion by saying, 
" Brevity is the soul of wit," and then seating myself*. But cir- 
cumstances seem to require a different course. It is with much 
hesitation I undertake the task before me, and only on consideration 
that I shall not be called upon at the next Centennial to do the 
same. 

We have gathered to-day to witness the planting of a tree which 
commemorates the Centennial Anniversary of our country's inde- 
pendence. May no treeson be practised 'neath its branches, but 
may many treeties of happiest omen spring from its shade. I need 
not speak to you of the great progress we have made in the past, 
for abler tongues than mine have told you often the wonderful 
story of our nation's growth. One hundred years ago our fore- 
fathers planted the tree of liberty. As with fervent devotion 
they cherished the tree of their planting, may we, in their memoiy, 
and for the good of coming generations, keep true to the princi- 
ples for which they nobly fought and died, and for which our own 
fathers and brothers have shed their life-blood. 

Not only is this the Centennial of our country, but also the 
Quarter-Centennial of our school. Let us look back with grateful 
hearts to Edward Lasell, the founder of our pleasant school, and 
long may his name be cherished in memory's album. Never was 
our school better prepared to welcome the seekers for wisdom. 
But what is the house without the inmates ? — the body without 
life ? Our conduct here may so influence those who follow us that 
they may, by improving on our example, raise Lasell to an honored 
name in the country. We are daily planting seeds which, like this 
elm-tree, shall spring up and bring forth fruit. Plant not weeds 
nor the thorn-bush, but plant the snowy lilies in all their purity ; 
the violet, sweet emblem of modesty, and the sturdy evergreen, 
which shall make our lives symmetrical in all true loveliness, and 
shall keep their fragrance in our life in the house not made with 
hands. 

It is fitting we should plant an elm ; not the oak, which speaks 
only of manly strength, and courage, and proud tyranny over the 
other beauties of the forest ; nor the pine, which ever seeks the 
heaven above, nor stays to shelter the weary ones of earth ; nor 
the drooping willow, which mourns low on the ground and fears 
to look at the blue above the cloud. But the elm never forgets 
the glory above ; yet sends out its wide-spreading branches to 
shelter us and cheer our hearts with its grace and beauty. 

" Like leaves on the tree, the race of man is found." Like the 
perfect leaf may we be found, not blighted in our growth. May 
our principles be firmly rooted in the rich soil of a fervent heart, 
that, like the tree whose root is deepest, may be found harder still 
to leave the ground. 

May the young women who come to Lasell well improve the 
hours, — not spend them in idle folly. May the falling of the 
withered leaves from this tree teach them that "Lost time can 
never be regained." May they indeed be "diligent in business," 
and come forth with the love of wisdom so fixed in their minds that 
they shall unceasingly search for it all their lives. May they not be 
"finished," only "well begun," and bring only the purest ma- 
terial for the Master's hand to work upon, that the harsh instru- 
ment may not break, only beautify. 



Here we are, bending and shaping our trees. Let us form noble 
aims, and then act; "do noble things, not dream them all day 
long ; " remembering what we plant in youth will, at the harvest 
time, bear its proper fruit. The tree bears fruit of its own 
kind. 

As we go forth to the real work of life, we cannot live to our- 
selves alone. May the influences we shed on those around us 
be such that they shall say we are planted in truth and upright- 
ness, and bear honor and love in our branches, which send forth 
leaves of healing to the nations. Truly, indeed, " the hand that 
rocks the cradle is the hand that moves the world." 

May we learn not only from the wisdom of the sages, but 
may we find 

" Tongues in trees, books in running brooks, 
Sermons in stones, and good in everything." 

And may all the young women who go forth from Lasell's doors 
by noble planning grow into perfect women. 



What is it in nature that impresses us most'/ Is it not the ab- 
sence of self-consciousness ? The violet and the oak are uncon- 
scious that there is in them either beauty or strength. The stars 
glow without attempt at parade or heraldry of their wonders. 
To say that a person is natural, is to say that he is forgetful of 
himself. It is the highest glory of art to conceal art, and what ap- 
plies to art applies also to character. The highest form of char- 
acter displays itself the least. Children are not aware of their 
brightness. Christian character loses much of its excellence, if it 
becomes conscious of itself. — Dr. Bridgman. 



Use words that you understand, or don't use any. We told the 
story recently, of the man who announced that he would "elim- 
inate the truth of the Gospel," but he meant expound. And now 
we are reminded by the story of the judge who declared that he 
proposed to reform the Bench, and that his decisions should be 
''neither partial nor impartial," of a clergyman who delivered his 
prayers and discourses in such a sing-song way, that he fell into 
numerous blunders. He once prayed to the Lord as the One who 
is "all-sufficient and insufficient." He also sent up a petition 
asking that "the intolerant may become tolerant, the indifferent 
different, and the industrious dustrious." And yet dictionaries 
are cheap, and the common schools are still open. 



We believe in the new system : Just read some of it ! ! 

The great English phonologist, Alexander Ellis, the inventor of 
the glossik system, has this to say for himself: "Ingglish aurthog- 
rafi was oarijinele fonetik ; that iz, it intensheneli reprizented dhi 
soundz ov werdz, and nuthing els. But werdz aultered in sound 
moar rapidli than skreibz wer eedher aibl or wiling to foloa. Az 
lona- az dhi leterz retaind dhair primitive valuez, dhair waz noa 
difikelti in chainjing." "Wun keurous filoalojikel konsikriens ov 
dheez too propoazishenz dizervz noatis." "Dhi edeukaishenel 
and soashel konsikwensez aar much moar impoartent." "Nou dhi 
lino-o-wistik ens of such a sistetn of glossik iz, ferst, too maik a 
nolej of nashenel foanetik rilaishenz familiar ." 



6 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



A dozen or more idlers around the Central Market were yester- 
day taking a deep interest in a war-map published in a New York 
daily paper, when Brother Gardner, the old colored man, pushed 
his way into the throng, and closely studied the map for a minute 
or two. "Whar 'bouts on dis map is ole Virginny ? " he sudd j nly 
called out. "It isn't on there at all," answered one of the crowd. 
"Whar 'bouts on dis map is Richmond ? " continued Gardner, run- 
ning his finger over the paper in a wild way. "How do you ex- 
pect to find Richmond on this map of Europe?" asked a by- 
stander. "How do I 'spect? Why, sah, what has de map of 
Europe to do widout Richmond ? Wasn't dar more fightin^aroun' 
Richmond den you could scare up in all Europe in ten years? 
Have dey gone an' ignored dat fact ? Have dey got out a map 
an' left dat town out in de cold ? Somebody find de town for me, 
an' I'll show you de exact spot where I was hit in de chin by a 
cannon ball, an' wounded all to pieces." "Go away ; this is a 
war-map of Turkey and Russia." "Widout any Richmond on 
it?" "No, sir; Richmond isn't here." "Den I'm gwine right away; 
gwine to git right out'n dis crowd in a hurry ! After all us folks 
fought, an' bled, an' died down dar, an' left our bones to bleach in de 
sun, it's a perfeck insult, say, to come aroun' heah wid a new 
wah-map showin' de Black Sea as big as a meetin'-house, an' 
leavin' Richmond clar off de fair-grounds entirely ! Come away 
from dat fraud, you cull'd folks ! " — Detroit Free Press. 



f hi f lEiii li&iiaa. 



" I thought I knew it!" she said; 

" I thought I had learned it quite !" 
But the gentle teacher shook her head, 

With a grave yet loving light 
In the eyes that fell on the upturned face, 

As she gave the book 
With the mark still set in the self-same place. 



"I thought I knew it!" she said; 
And a heavy tear fell down 
As she turned away with bending head ; 

Yet not for reproof or frown, 
And not for the lesson to learn again, 

Or the play-hour lost; 
It was something else that gave the pain. 



She could not have put it in words, 

But her teacher understood, 
As God understands the chirp of the birds 

In the depths of an autumn wood ; 
And a quiet touch on the reddening cheek 

Was quite enough; 
No need to question, no need to speak. 



Then the gentle voice was heard, 

" Now I will try you again ;" 
And the lesson was mastered, every word ; 

Was it not worth the pain ? 
Was it not kinder the task to turn 

Than to let it pass 
As a lost, lost leaf that she did not learn ? 



Is it not often so, 

That we only learn in part, 
And the Master's testing time may show 

That it was not quite " by heart" ? 
Then he gives, in his wise and patient grace, 

The lesson again, 
With the mark still set in the self-same place. 

Only stay by his side 

Till the page is really known ; 
It may be we failed because we tried 

To learn it all alone. 
And now that he would not let us lose 

One lesson of love 
(For he knows the loss) , can we refuse ? 

But oh ! how could we dream 

That we knew it all so well, 
Reading so fluently, as we deem, 

What we could not even spell ? 
But oh ! how could we grieve once more 

That patient One 
Who has turned so many a task before 

That waiting One, who now 

Is letting us try again ; 
Watching us with the patient brow 

That bore the wreath of pain ; 
Thoroughly teaching what he would teach 

Line upon line, 
Thoroughly doing his work in each. 

Then let our hearts be still, 

Though our task be turned to-day ; 
Oh ! let him teach us what he will, 

In his most gracious way, 
Till, sitting only at Jesus' feet, 

As we leai-n each line, 
The hardest is found all clear and sweet. 
Good Words.'] 



(ESTABLISHED 1847.) 

AARON R. GAY & CO., 

130 STATE STREET, BOSTON, 

Stationers mi Blank Book Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

THOMAS D. COOK, 



AGENT FOR THE 



NEW ENGLAND ICE CREAM CO. 



l,f nil, 

No. 8 PROVINCE COURT, BOSTON. 

Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at very Reasonable Rates. 
Wedding and other Parties served with care and promptness. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

T^ILO R, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Jfearly opposite Summer St. BOSTON. 

PBINTIIVK OFFICII, &c, FOR SALE. 
Printing Office, Novelty Octavo Press, 25 fonts stand- 
ard new styles of type, etc. Price $75 cash, worth double, 
t.ciuiine Confederate SIOOO Bonds and Con- 
federate Bills, and Old Coins cheap. A note for $100, 
25 cents. 
Scroll and visiting cards, any style, 25 cents per pack. 

ERNEST K. PACKARD, So. Boston, Mass. 

WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington Street, Boston, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 
and Piano Studies, both Koreigu and American, 
Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 
Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

SST. H. FRENCH &c CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

HUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. B. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



DR. A. W. WHITNEY, 

WEST NEWTON. 



"OARBIAGES." 

We. have, a large stock of seasonable and 

FAMILY CARRIAGES 

AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

112 SUDBURY ST., BOSTON. 

F. E. CROCKETT, M. D., 

HOMIEOPATHIST, 
Eesidence, Washington Street, opp, Elm Street, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Office hours, before Si A.M., 1-3 and 7-8 P.M. 



ISJ-IOIEaiOLjS dfc T3I^^T_jT_j, 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
HWIUXTG BIROTIKIEIFtS 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. O. Address, Auburndale, 

WATERS & INMAN, 

■WHST NBV^TON AKJID A XJ" B XX J=t 1ST X3 .A. L B , 
DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

C SARGENT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 

night. 

GEO. W. DEAN & CO., 

f aureiaa Vvulfo § ftroftiM* 

13 & 15 Merchants Row, 
BOSTON. 



john Hancock 

^Tutukl L(ife Ii^ui'k/qde Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Has Accumulated Assets Exceeding $2,650,000. 



GEORGE THORNTON, President. 

GEO. B. WOODWARD Secretary 

CHARLES G. WOOD Treasurer 

SAMUEL ATHERTON Vice-President 

J. C. WHITE Medical Examiner 

SAMUEL WELLS Counsel 

ERANK M. HAYDEN, .... Supervisor of Agents 

BCMMMHT UBAB CO. 

(Incorporated in 1829.) 

J. JUL. CHAD WICK <& CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVEE STKEET, BOSTON, 

MANCFACXUBEKS OP 

W,mtWi than Hie leal, 

DRY AND CROUND IN OIU_ ^ 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure W like Lead, both dry and ground in oil, we war- 
rant to be STRICTLY PURE, and guarantee that for Fine- 
ness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any Lead 
in the market, either foreign or American. 

*&*=■ In order to protect ourselves we have adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed EtED STAR with our 
corporate seal in the centre. This is on every package of 
our PUltE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO. 

"PLACED AT THE HEAD," 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of ilerit 
at the 

CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill m our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURING PERMANENCE OF TONE, 

Warerooms, 484 Washington Street, BOSTON, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue Free. 

^ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & ROWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Paiiiteiy $u t pplie0, Sfti^W Materikl^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



A 



tk 



mb 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FRANK E. PORTER, M. D. 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases, and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

Nuts, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c 
1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. PR\NK E. RICHARDSON. 

FFtACTK WOOD, 

STE^.^O: PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bromfield Street, BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School ivork* 

JOEL GOLDTHWAIT & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CAEPETINGS, 

Nos. 167 and 169 Washington Street, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



BOSTON. 



\VM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



OLIVER DITSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Sheet Music and Music Books, 

Pianos, Organs and Melodeons, 

451 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

NEW ENGLAND OONSEEV&TORT Of MUSIC. 
16,000 Pupils since 1S157. 50 eminent Professors. Best 
Methods. 115 hours for $15.00. 

THE NORMAL INSTITUTE, 
A sea-side summer school, course elective. 70 Lecturers 
and Professors. Literary and Musical departments. 

Address, JE. Toukjee, Music Hall, Boston, 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 
Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

J". KNO^VLjES cfc SONS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smokad anil Pickled 

CLAMS, O-Z-STIEIRS cSs SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Blsh sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 & 123 Faneuil Hall Market, - - - - BOSTON, 

J. Knowles. R. H. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 

SWAN «Sc NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 



No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 



HENRY SWAN, 
S. B. NEWTON. 



BOSXOM. 



^W- J3- LATHROP, 

AtTBlTKNOAXiE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding Stable. 

Also, Auburndale & Boston Express. 



8 



LASELL LEA FES. 



THE 



NEW-YORK 

L(ife Ingui^nde Conqpariy, 

346 & 348 Broadway, New "York. 



MORRIS FRANKLIN, WILLIAM H. BEERS, 

President. Vice-President & Actuary. 

Established 1845 Purely Mutual 



ASSETS, $35,000,000.00 



BOSTON BRANCH OFFICE: 

Congress Building, 4 Post-Office Square, 
STOCKING & AUSTIN, Managers. 



JAMES W. KIDNEY, 




§ 



Mechanics' Exchange, 33 & 35 Hawley St. 



Order Box 294. 



BOSTON. 



Edge-Stones Set; Streets, Places, Private 

Avenues, and all kinds of Plain and 

Fancy Paving done promptly. 

EVERY VARIETY OF PAVING MATERIALS FURNISHED, IF DESIRED, 

Attention given to the building of Railroad Tracks, 

>6£if*Mr. Kidney can be found at the Exchange, between 
the hours of 12 and 1. 

$100 SAVED is $ioo EARNED 

The above amount can be saved by every 
family in one YEAR, by puvchasing their gro- 
ceries at the mammoth store of 

C. I>. COBB «fc BROTHERS, 

722, 726 and 728 Washington St. 

For the past thirty years our motto has been 
large sales and small profits, and our con- 
stantly increasing trade is sufficient guarantee 
that our efforts in that line have proved a success. 

Examine our Prices. What $1.00 Will Buy! 

3 Pounds Prime Oolong Tea, $1 00 

11 " French Breakfast Coffee, ... 1 00 

10 " Corn Starch l 00 

10 " Silver Gloss Starch, l oo 

12 " Flake Tapioca 1 00 

10 " pearl Tapioca, l oo 

10 " Pearl Sago, 1 00 

20 " Canada Oat Meal 1 00 

25 " Fresh Hominy l 00 

25 " Samp, l 00 

17 " Prime Carolina Rice l 00 

40 " Yellow Bolted Meal 1 00 

14 " Choice Dried Apples 1 00 

15 " Choice Prunes 1 00 

13 Quaris Best Medium Beans l 00 

10 " Best Pea Beans, 1 00 

10 " Split Peas 1 00 

25 Pounds Prime Popping Corn 1 00 

12 Tumblers Pure Fruit Jellies 1 00 

5 2% lb. bars arnold's standard extra 

Soap l 00 

5 21/2 lb. Bars Curtis Davis' Extra Soap, . l oo 

10 Bars American I'eerless Soap, 1 00 

14 Bars Babbitt's Best Soap 1 00 

10 Bars Babbitt's n. Y. City Soap, .... l oo 

10 Cakes Imported Castile Soap, 1 00 

Don't fail to give us a call before purchasing. 
All goods packed in strong cases and deliveued 
free 100 mii.es. 

Call and got, or send for, catalogue of goods 
with prices, which will give full particulars. 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

principal warehouse, 

Nos. 722, 726 8c 728 Washington St., Boston 

BRANCH STORES: 140 Hanover, cor. Union St., Boston 

1311 and 1313 Washington Street, Boston. 2235 

Washington St., Boston. Cor. Main & 

Milk Sis., Westboro'. 145 & 147 

Main St., Fitchburg. 



THE BEST PLACE 



TO BUY 



FURNITURE 



IS AT 



PAIHI'S MANUFACTORY, 



48 CJ±2<TJ±Tj STREET, 



BOSTON. 



COLLIER & PERKINS, 



3 



Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

ENGRAVINGS, CHR0I0S 

Frames, Stereoscopes and Views, 
VELVET FRAMES & PASSEPARTOUTS, 

ins^noxjLiDiisra-s,) 

And every Article desired by the Picture Dealer and 
US Frame Maker. 

361 WASHINGTON STREET, 

3 Doors North of Bromfield St. BOSTON. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STORE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



MASS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

Goods delivered free of charge. 



J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH, AND 162 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, 



AND 



Auburn Street, Auburndale 




GROCERIES, 

AT 

Lo-west ITvIsLi-lsLet Prices. 
aJ®* Send for Catalogue of Prices, .ffisr 



NEW DRUG ST ORE ! 

The subscribers would inform the residents of Au- 
burndale and vicinity that they have opened a 

DRUG STORE, 

In the new building adjoining their Grocery store, on 
Auburn Street, facing Grove, and will keep on hand 
a Fresh Stock of 

PURE DRUGS, 
CHEMICALS, 

PATENT MEDICINES, 

TOILET ARTICLES, &c. 

This Department is under the management of 
MR. BRUSH, an apothecary of large experience. 
Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed at all 
hours, from purest and best drugs. 

J. VIOKERS <& OO., 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

ABEAM FRENCH & CO. 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods 
and Plated Ware, 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET, 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. W ells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
\Vm. A. French. 
S. Waldo French. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS TN 



Iitliti 1 Material 



NOS. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



THE! 

Mil MUFACTUR1 CUFANT, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. 
R. Eager, of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of 

The " Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., 





TDTTISL IFiZEivEIISr^. FACTI. 



Volume II. 



LASELL SEMINARY, MAY, 1877. 



Number 4. 



A GREAT BUSINESS. 

The luxury of carpets, though in Eastern life older 
even than houses, is in a comparative novitiate with 
our Western civilization. The latter saw little of it 
until Le Grande Monarque grafted the Turkish pro- 
duct on French taste ; and, as late as the days of Queen 
Mary, Royalty itself did not refuse rush matting. When 
inventive genius, impelled by the first Napoleon, 
brought forth the Jacquard loom, and the workmen of 
Lyons rose to crush the new invader of their indus- 
tries, it was thought that the acme of improvement was 
reached ; but it remained for Yankee ingenuity to give 
its last and mightiest stimulus. 

A half a century ago, a Boston man made an appli- 
cation of the power-loom to ingrain and other carpets, 
which had been despaired of in Europe; and, in a brief 
space, his establishment at Lowell, Mass., turned out 
more work, in less time, and of better quality, than any 
other in the world. Our modern machinery makes now 
a thousand stitches while the nimble fingers of Asiatic 
maidens are making one. The new-born industry 
naturally drew with it trading-houses worthy of its 
magnitude, and one outgrowth in Boston was that of 
John H. Pray, Sons & Co., by far the oldest in New 
England, and one of the largest in America. 

They are the most extensive dealers in Lowell car- 
pets, and have many advantages in being the sole pro- 
prietors of certain patterns. But their trade embraces 
also every variety, foreign as well as home-made, and 
extends to every State of the Union. Some idea of it 
may be had from the fact that the wholesale alone 
amounts to a million and a half annually, and, with the 
retail, over two millions, which is more than all the 
carpet business of Massachusetts when their house was 
founded. 

A visit to their great establishment, 558 and 560 
Washington Street, will give some conception of the 
quantity and quality of the goods passing through this 
establishment every year. One secret of the success of 
the house is that the public get the full benefit ofits 
experience and immense advantages in purchasing 
stock; and as I. W. Adams, a member of the firm, who 
has made their purchases for twenty years, entirely re- 
lizes "goods well bought are half sold," the benefit 
is a mutual one. 

Here may be had every style and quality, from the 
neat, unpretentious oil cloth, to the luxurious Imperial 
Brussels; the linoleum, soft and durable; those com- 
pounds of Scotch economy and American skill, ingrains 
of every grade and pattern, the velvety and enticing 
Wilton, the rich and tasteiul Axminsters, tapestry, in 
workmanship and harmony worthy of the Gobelins, 
cardinal velvets of cruciform design and shades suitable 
for the sanctuary; and all at prices so reasonable that 
the mechanic of today may enjoy what the monarch 
of the last century might envy. 

The conscientious purpose of the firm is to give the 
public nothing but what is trustworthy and fair in 
quality and price. On no other basis could a business 
continue as this has, for more than half a century, in- 
tact, anil, in spite of the fires and financial depressions 
and public and private vicissitudes of two generations, 
constantly increase. 

Their career is like a grand Turkish carpet, all of a 
piece, with integrity for its central design, and enter- 
prise for its ever-extending boi'der. That the warp of 
their energy and the woof of their stability may endure 
with interwoven taste and attractiveness, is something 
which those who admire what is genuine and honest in 
these times of sham and shoddy, should, by hearty pat- 
ronage, promote. 



Alice Dunsmore. 



Editor — Jennie Darling. 

Assistant Editors : 

Anna Howe. 



Susie Drew. 



Publishers : 



Cora Flint. 



Carrie Kendig. 



Once more, kind friends, we lay our " Leaves " before you, and trust they may 
receive as hearty a welcome as those which now deck the myriad trees tha* 
beautify this delightful village. 

How suggestive the name of our little sheet — Lasell Leaves! It reminds us 
that we shall soon all be taking our leaves of this charming retreat, sweetened by 
so many pleasing recollections, and endeared to so many of us by the friendships 
we have formed with teachers and schoolmates ; and we trust that our kind Prin- 
cipal will not say, as did a certain melancholy prince on being told by his chief 
courtier that he should take his leave : " You could not take from me anything 
with which I would more willingly part withal." 

The thought occurs to us, and the wish also, .that our paper may be not like the 
barren fig-tree that bore "nothing but leaves," but rather, like the tender verdure 
of the trees now mantling our orchards and gardens, give promise of a fruitage 
that shall gladden the hearts and nourish the minds of those who may be so 
fortunate as to recline beneath its branches. 

We recollect to have heard, in our infancy, that " Great oaks from little acorns 
grow," and we have faith to believe that, favored by the fostering care of our friends 
and the incentive spur of a laudable ambition, our modest little sheet may yet become 
a worthy contemporary of some of the highest and noblest efforts in this particular 
domain of letters. And may we not hope that the Lasell Leaves shall greet its 
readers with a perennial freshness and variety as grateful to the mind and heart as 
to the Grecian student were the leaves of laurel that waved in the groves of the 
Athenian Academy? 



Ths A&& Isiples. 

Admitting that we are not especially an art-loving people, are we tending in that 
direction ? The question involves too much for a brief article. We can only make 
a few notes of the signs of the times. 

The Centennial wave, last year, rolling westward, brought hither some of the 
skill of more artistic races— wonderful carvings and mouldings and delicate tracery, 
the graceful fashionings of cunning Oriental fingers. They took their places beside 
our stalwart machinery and shrewd mechanical inventions, the result of practical 
Aryan brains, as oddly as the almond-eyed artificers themselves among their 
Occidental brethren. 

The crowd always gathered round these exhibits, — the weary, patient crowd of 
men and women, — in all last summer's blistering heat, that made ornament almost 
a source of disgust, and " a thing of beauty " no longer " a joy forever." Prom 
ceramics and carvings, the persistent throng moved onward to Memorial Hall, 
often the hottest place of all, but always the favorite resort. Were they gaining a 
truly artistic stimulus, or only what one has well called " a mass of undigested 
impressions" . ? 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Ceramics have been more than ever the fashion of the past 
winter. Household art, which was well represented at the Inter- 
national Exhibition, even more than ceramics, interests the 
popular mind. Artisans have become disciples of Eastlake, and 
everybod}' is supposed to read the popular articles of Clarence 
Cook and Elliott upon the subject. 

Notwithstanding some contradictory evidences, the results of 
such studies begin to show themselves in the increased general 
good taste. A sense of fitness in form and color, and in harmo- 
nious arrangement, begins to show itself in rooms and furniture, 
in carpets, and especially in pretty wall-papers. 

Good foreign pictures we have never lacked ; and, as to our 
own artists, it must not be forgotten how we were represented at 
the last French Exposition. The work of Mr. La Parge in the 
new Trinity Church, at Boston, added to its architecture, makes 
that building an educator in art, as well as a worthy precedent 
for future churches. 

A number of our young men and women, who have been studying 
abroad, are now exhibiting in New York and Boston. Some of 
the work is excellent, and mure is honest in purpose and of future 
promise. The number of women artists among them compares 
favorably with the men, considering how much less frequently the 
latter can pursue an uninterrupted course of preparation. One 
lady, a former pupil of Lasell, is noticed in this sheet. 

The would-be artists are only less in number than the would-be 
writers, and are as surely pushed to the wall by the abler and 
better equipped. Too often these disappointed aspirants are 
women, doubtless for reasons above mentioned. On the lower 
plane of art, the decorative, many may succeed. In sculpture and 
painting, comparatively few can do even well, and " not one in a 
million," says Ruskin, "is great." "Art," continues this writer, 
"will only make its students wiser and happier, but will not make 
them get on ; will not, in fact, pay." He further urges the study 
of art for the simple love of excellence. Personal ambition, he 
holds, harms both the work and worker. 

This high motive, the love of excellence, brings its own reward, 
with which mainly the art student must be satisfied. It opens 
the eyes to all beauty and worth. It ennobles the whole character, 
and enhances the value of all human labor. 

Whosoever would wed art does well to count the cost. The 
bread-winner can seldom win also a high ideal. 

As Ruskin says, "Art does not pay in money." 



Sweet thoughts come stealing o'er me, 
Like sunshine after the mist; 

And dreams of the far-off future, — 
Sweet dreams that I cannot resist. 

And what are my dreams so golden, — 
These dreams of the twilight hour? 

You may call them " only girl fancies," 
But to me they have wondrous power : 

The power of making me happy, 
Destroying all sadness and pain, 

Filling the world with beauty ; 
So I dream them again and again. 

Shall I enter the haven of rest 

At the close of life's swift-fleeting hour? 
Shall I join with the ransomed and blest 

In singing the Saviour's great power? 



Our Father in love has given 
To youth these visions fair ; 

Then should not our hearts to heaven 
Rise often in praise and prayer? 

How glorious then our future! 

So lustrous the beauties seem ; 
Oh, thank the dear Lord for his mercy, 

And may we still often dream ! 



The merits of Dr. Whitney as a skilful surgeon and physician 
are so well known in this and the adjoining town, that it seems 
superfluous to dwell at length on the subject. Those who may 
avail themselves of his valuable services will never have cause to 
regret it. 

Every one who is able to purchase a carriage should visit the 
well-known firm of Kimball Brothers, at 112 Sudbury Street, 
Boston, and sec the magnificent display of vehicles of all kinds, 
to suit the most extravagant or the most economic taste. By all 
means give them a call. By the way, when is "our" Mr. 
Kimball to delight us again with a reading ? 

Fish of all kinds, and from all waters, can be found at J. 
Knowles & Son's stalls, 121 and 123 F. H. Market. The deep sea 
cod or halibut, the speckled trout or graceful pickerel of our 
mountain streams, the patrician oyster, the plebeian clam, and the 
cosmopolitan lobster, alike repose on the shelves of this well- 
known monger. 

Og'SpMi.taiiis, 

How you do all elevate your noses, shrug your shoulders, and 
feel like putting your hands over your ears while you say to your- 
selves : " Oh ! the stupid things ! as if we did not know enough about 
them already from experience !" But, my friends, you will know 
more about them if you live much longer. As for me, I feel that, 
if the burden which this subject causes to rest on my mind is not soon 
removed, something dreadful will happen. 

It seems to be an established fact, alas ! that compositions 
must be written ; but how shall we write them ? Some one 
answers in the same old way: "Choose your subject, spend much 
thought upon it, and every time you have an idea write it down." 
That is very easy to say, and sounds very nice when it is said ; 
but I would like to remark that ideas, especially good ones, are 
very scarce articles. Happy indeed are those favored mortals 
who have plenty of ideas combined with the faculty of express- 
ing them. I have tried every imaginable method of writing, or 
of finding something to write about, and of forming what is called 
" a good style." I usually spend a week in selecting a subject, 
racking my own brain for one, and asking all my friends to suggest 
one for me. In the latter way, I generally have little success, 
for my partners in distress either look at me, with vexation de- 
picted on their countenances, and say : "Oh, don't ask me!" or 
demand from me a subject for their own use. At length I find one 
on which I think I am perhaps capable of composing a few sentem 
ces. Then, some day, I get paper enough to write a book, sharpen 
several pencils to the last degree of sharpness, sit down and 
prepare to write. I take a sheet of paper, select the best pencil, 
and write, very slowly, the subject. In crossing a "t" or dotting 
an "i," the point of the pencil breaks. Throwing it aside, I 
take another; at least, think I am going to, — but where is it ? It 
was certainly on the table beside me. After a search of some 
minutes, it is found in my pocket, in great danger of losing its 
beautiful point. During this time, the room has become un- 
comfortably warm. But, opening the window and endeavoring to 



LASELL LEAVES. 



keep calm, I again seat myself and take up my paper, saying : 
" Let me see ; what was the last thing I wrote ? " Well, the last 
thing I wrote was the subject, and I sit there staring at it, vainly 
trying to think of something to say about it. Suddenly I think I 
have something ; but as soon as I start to write it, I become sensi- 
ble of the fact that I cannot express it very well. Alter compos- 
ing several sentences, stating the thought in various ways, I come 
to the conclusion that it isn't a very remarkable thought anyway ; 
so I stick my pencil in my mouth, and stare at the ceiling, but 
soon find myself wondering if there ever was a girl who would 
rather write compositions than do anything else, and if so, how 
she looked. Throwing down my paper and pencil, 1 get up and 
pace the floor, pale and agitated, murmuring, '' My kingdom for 
an idea ! " But the ideas do not come ; and as I am conscious of 
having lessons to learn, I give it up for that day. Sometimes 
these proceedings are repeated for several days, with very little 
change. 

Some day I take my writing materials under my arm, and go 
out of doors, into the woods, anywhere, hoping in this way to gain 
inspiration ; but that is of no use ; I get scared at the horrid bugs, 
or else there is a thunder shower. Then again, perhaps when I 
am sitting at the window enjoying the beauties of a charming 
sunset, the thought of my composition intrudes itself, and I think, 
"There 1 that would be a good subject ;" but when I try to write 
on it, I find my mistake. If you have ever tried to describe any- 
thing sublime, without being able to command suitable language, 
you can appreciate my feelings. But the days fly by; the time 
when that composition must be ready approaches ; I grow thin 
and pale ; at night I see the word "composition" in immense let- 
ters, dancing before my eyes. I dream of mountains of paper, 
rivers of ink, and forests of lead pencils, all of which I am to ex- 
haust in writing before I can be happy. "What must be, must 
be;" so my compositions get written after a fashion, but with 
what trials and tribulations on my part none can know. 

Tell me, ye sympathizing girls, who think compositions :i bore, 
Do you not know some place where essays'are no more? 
Some school for young women, away in the far, far West, 
Where, free from compositions, a sad young woman may rest? 
The girls, all groaning in perpetual woe, 
Stop for a while, — then, groaning, answer, "No." 



We quote the following for the express benefit of the young 
woman who voted for Cooper last fall : 

Last week a greenback man from Sac County, Iowa, who reads 
nothing but Brick Pomeroy's paper, went to New York, found his 
way to Peter Cooper, shook hands with the old man, exhibited 
his recommendations, and asked for the English mission or the 
Sac Rock post-office. And he was so amazed to learn that Uncle 
Peter had not been elected, that he got up and went away with- 
out his hat and overcoat, and came all the way back to Iowa 
without saying a word until he reached home, when he dropped 
into a chair and roared, "Don't you never let me set eyes on ary 
an infernal lyin' newspaper agin, or I'll tear the house up by the 
roots ! " — Burlington Hawkeye. 

All who like a delicious iCe cream — one that will melt in your 
mouth — should away without delay, to 8 Province Court, Boston. 
They may expect a cool reception, but they will always go again, 
for Mr. Cook as a caterer is a success, as we have experienced. 

Clothed in "Ironclad pants and overalls," a man may bid defi- 
ance to wind and weather, the whips and scorns of time, or the 
slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. Go to the Eager Manu- 
facturing Co., 39 Kingston St., Boston, all ye who want to be 
"Ironclad." 



The prairies are spread out before us ; 

The sun sinks low in the West ; 
The earth is sinking to slumber, 

And the birds sing their last song of rest. 
We see in the dimness of distance 

A band of darkest green ; 
We speak, and thei'e comes back answer! — 

No voice has spoken, I ween! 
Ah, no ! it's only the echo 

From the far-off wooded glen ; 
Thus our words have travelled through distance, 

And returned to us, void, again. 
But perhaps some one has heard them, 

In the still, quiet hour on the plain: 
And perhaps some one is happier 

For taking up the refrain. 
Despair not! then, oh, my brother! 

Kind words on the breezes send ; 
So shall the echoes of thy life 

In eternal harmony blend. 



If, IliMi' J Lsetises. 

We are enjoying a rare opportunity in the course of lectures 
now being delivered by Mr. James T. Fields. They are upon sub- 
jects interesting and instructive to all , notwi thstanding some good (? ) 
authorities declare that we should not make a special study of 
modern literature. 

We remember with what sorrow and surprise we heard one 
critic assert that "Tennyson possesses too much expression for 
the thing expressed ; and makes up for originality of thought, by 
originality of expression." 

Mr. Fields, by his charming and vivid manner of presenting his 
favorites, awakens an interest in their personal characters that 
must lead us to a deeper love and study of their writings. 

These lectures are mosaics of precious things. To give 
the "best parts," would be to give them entire, which would not 
do. But we venture to print a few sparkling bits. 

Extracts from the Lecture on Tennyson : "Tennyson is as unaf- 
fected as an oak in the forest ; honest as the sunlight ; and frank 
as the sea-wind. 

"Tennyson's perfection in the structure of his verse is marvel- 
lous ; he is intellectually finished. Only the perfected things live 
in any art, have value, and grow in worth. Longfellow says : 
'In the elder days of Art, 

Builders wrought with greatest care 
Each minute and unseen part; 
For the Gods see everywhere.' " 

"Tennyson is a master in philosophy and botany, as well as in 
poetry. He is also a fine Greek scholar — one of the best in Eng- 
land." 

"Tennyson is the very genius of verification ; he seems all his 

life to have remembered that if we do not know a thing accurately 
we do not know it all. There are no flaws in his memory." 

From the Lecture on Keats and Shelley : "The Greeks have two 
words to signify a poet — "singer" and "maker." Tennyson is 
both maker and singer. Robert Browning is maker, always, but 
not always the singer. Keats and Shelley are both. 

"I can never sufficiently emphasize in your hearing, how great a 
boon is poetry to the student who is" seeking for those amenities 
of culture which sweeten knowledge. 'The true poet,' says Plu- 
tarch, 'is the soul's physician.' 

"Genius and fame have nothing whatever to do with ancestry. 
Shakespeare's father was a trader in wool, and Keats' father wore 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



a stall frock. When we go up into the mountain-top of poetry to 
hear the great voices that speak to us on the heights, we are not 
apt to look very sharply among the genealogical trees before we 

pause to listen. 

•If the rose 

Were born a lily, and, by force of art 

And eagerness for light, grew tall and fair, 

'Twere a true type of the first fiery soul 

That makes a low name honorable. They 

Who take it by inheritance alone — 

Adding no brightness to it— are like stars 

Seen in the ocean, that were never there 

But for the bright originals in Heaven.' " 



A VBiW 

Mr. Editor, — Did you ever angle ? If not, don't. It's the 
most harrowing farce that mortal can take part in. Harrowing 
to the angler, I mean, although it is probably somewhat harrowing 
to the fishy tribe as well. 

Healthy exercise they call it; so when I went down to the 
country, worn out physically and mentally, I caught eagerly at 
the bait healthy, thrown out by unfeeling countrymen. Here was 
a chance to recuperate in two weeks' time ! 

Healthy ! Well, perhaps it is ; but sitting for hours under a 
broiling sun, on a bare rock overhanging a fish- frequented stream 
dangling and jerking a useless line, watching, hoping, praying in 
vain for a nibble, is very effective in producing a melancholy 
cast of features, and brings rery forcibly to mind old Dr. John- 
son's definition of angling: " A rod and line, with a worm at one 
end and a fool at the other." 

You may wriggle and jerk the string at your pleasure ; but the 
more you jerk and wriggle, the more serenely those animalg 
sweep through the cool, gurgling waters, staring up at you with 
a sarcastic leer It is, to say the least, exasperating; and, to a 
person of excitable nature, it offers a great temptation for the use 
of language not strictly biblical. 

The catching of your first fish is an episode ever to be remem 
bered. If the harmless creature embodied the spirit of all your 
wife's relations, you could not experience more felicity in wit- 
nessing its struggles and gasps. It lies at your feet innocent and 
beautiful, lovely colors chasing each other over the silvery scales, 
quivering in its last agony ; but the sight stirs no pity in your 
heart, — only a fierce sort of satisfaction that you have it at last. 

With the capture of the first, novelty is gone and patience 
ceases to be a virtue. It is evident that the ghost of your first 
victim appears to his credulous relations, warning them of that 
innocent-looking tidbit which proved his death-warrant. You 
may obtain a second bite, but it is doubtful. There you may sit, 

'' There see the sun both rise and set, 
There bid good morning to next day, 
There meditate your time away 
And angle on ; and beg to have 
A quiet passage to a welcome grave." 

If, perchance, a desire to move on fires your heart, the thought 
of the jeers which your poor success will immediately call forth at 
home may lead you to adopt my plan of innocently walking home 
by way of a fish market, and purchasing a dozen or two of large, 
fresh specimens. Of course, the easiest way of carrying them is 
on your line, and, voila, you are safe. You are complimented and 
applauded by veteran fishers, and henceforth enrolled among the 
enthusiastic disciples of Izaac Walton. 



Let me add, however, if a fair amount of worldly wisdom has 
fallen to your lot, you won't go again. In conclusion, a benedic- 
tion upon "all that are lovers of virtue, and dare trust in provi- 
dence, and be quiet and go a-angling." 

An Anti-Angler. 



The tempting array of viands displayed so profusely in the at- 
tractive store of Pluta & Hills, is enough to make a hungry man 
sigh, and give a dyspeptic the blues for a month. Give them a 
call, ye hungry ones, and be filled. 

All who are desirous of "mending their ways" should read the 
advertisement of James W. Kidney, paver, 33 and 34 Hawley St., 
Boston. He will, with promptness and despatch, make the crooked 
straight and the rough places plain in any locality where his 
services may be required. 

Wadsworth Bros, are to be found at No. 34 India Street, 
Boston. All our friends must bear in mind that without good 
paint they cannot become good artists ; so we hope a word to the 
wise will be sufficient. 

Fresh milk, unmixed with the aqueous fluid or any other 
foreign matter, can always be obtained of the Irving Brothers. 
In fact, they are of milkmen the "creme de la creme. 1 ' 

One word for the " art preservative of all arts." An embryo 
Franklin makes to you his earnest appeal for recognition, and is 
willing to sell you a whole printing office for a mere song ; and, to 
make the inducement still more tempting, will throw in a lot of 
Confederate Bonds for the paltry sum of twenty-five cents. See 
advertisement of E. Packard. 



k Visit to Cambridge Potteiy, 

A short time ago, it was our good fortune to receive an invita- 
tion to examine the workings of a real pottery, that of A. Hews 
& Co., situated in North Cambridge. From Auburndale we rode 
to Allston, and thence to Cambridge, a city whose dwellings pre- 
sent such an air of culture and refinement that one instinctively 
feels the invisible presence of that dearest of all bards, — our own 
Longfellow. 

Not alone is the spot dear because of the poet, but many are 
the distinguished personages who have trodden the same ground 
that we are now treading. To our lips involuntarily spring these 
lines : — 

"This is the place, stand still, my steed; 
Let me review the scene, 
And summon from the shadowy past 
The forms that once have been. 

The past and present here unite 

Beneath time's flowing tide; 
Like footprints hidden by a brook, 

But seen on either side. 

The shadows of the linden trees 

Lay moving on the grass ; 
Between them and the moving boughs, 

A shadow thou didst pass." 

Upon arrival at the pottery, we were met by the gentlemanly 
proprietors, who kindly offered to guide us through the establish, 
merit. We were first conducted to an underground apartments 
where we saw the clay in its original condition. After undergo- 
ing various processes, it is put into a longitudinal case, and tightly 
compressed. It issues from this case in cubical blocks, each con-, 
taining the requisite amount for the production of the desired 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



article. The blocks of clay are carried to another room, where 
they are placed in moulds, and here our risibilities are at once 
affected. A number of workmen are busily engaged in the manu- 
facture of flower-pots, while their moulding apparatus, being 
moved by foot-power, necessitates a very frog-like pantomime on 
the part of the operators. 

In the antiquarian department are models of the pitchers and 
vases found by Dr. Schlieman in the recent Trojan excavations. 
Our next move was to the room of painting and ornamentation ; and 
in the last room visited we found many interesting objects, not the 
least interesting of which was the Cremation Jar. On our return, 
we spent a short time at Harvard in examining the natural history 
specimens at Peabody Museum. Through the kindness of Prof. 
Putnam, much valuable information concerning the collection was 
gained. In after years, when we recall the many delightful ex- 
cursions planned for us at Lasell, certainly the one to Harvard and 
the Pottery will not be forgotten. 

The telescope which the astronomy class had been expecting 
for several weeks arrived at midnight, May 3d. The planets not 
being then visible, the observers were not wakened from their 
slumbers till three o'clock A. M. One member of the class was 
so startled by the knocking upon her door, that she was unable to 
see clearly the shape of Mars' belts, the moons of Jupiter and the 
crater upon the moon. Although the early morning gave indica- 
tions of a bright day, and the class were promised to be shown 
some spots upon the sun, when the sun rose it was so covered by 
clouds that even the telescope could not pierce them. 



The Paris correspondent of the London News thus writes of an 
American lady artist, long residing in Paris, who is well known 
to many of our art patrons : — 

" Miss E. J. Gardner, as usual, stands well out from all 
rivals among the lady artists resident in Paris ; and this year 
she bids fair to produce a conception as exquisite as her 
thoughtful and finished painting of Oorinne, which carried 
off the honors of the Salon two years ago. " Ruth and Nao- 
mi" is the subject which Miss Gardner has chosen this year ; 
and her manner of treating it shows all the careful work and 
brilliant imagination which have already stamped her pictures 
with the warranty of genius. Ruth and Naomi are standing 
together in the gray light of an Eastern morning at the natural 
time for beginning a journey, while the other daughter-in-law of 
the bereaved woman is seen just entering a Moabitish city in the 
distance. The surrounding landscape is managed with much 
boldness and truth to nature, and it wears a peculiarly Eastern 
aspect, while the primitive Asiatic costumes are composed with 
as much art as learning. The entreating manner, half trust, 
half supplication, with which Ruth lays her hand upon the elder 
woman's shoulder has an extremely delicate pathos in it. For 
the rest, the faces are good, and both authentic Oriental types of 
womanhood. They are also well contrasted ; and the harmony of 
colors throughout the whole picture is perfect." Miss Gardner 
is a New Englander by birth, and a graduate of Lasell Seminary 
at Auburndale ; class of 1856. 



The young lady who sat by the piano, playing and singing " Who 
shall care for mother now?" while the old lady was performing a con- 
certo on the wash-board in the kitchen, could not have been in the 
habit of using one of Hallet, Davis & Co.'s magnificent instruments; 
for the sweet tones would have so humanized her heart 
that she would have cared for mother herself, and become 
one of the most dutiful of daughters. The high rank that many of 
the young ladies at Lasell have attained as players is in great 
measure due to the excellence of this noble instrument. 



To those of our friends who may require the services of a 
physician, we take great pleasure in introducing Dr. F. E. Porter 
of this ward. To a cultured and refined manner, he brings the 
all-important addition of rare skill and conscientious care to all 
who may be so fortunate as to secure his attention. 



On these warm days it is most refreshing to recall that pleasant 
March evening, the occasion of the Juniors' "Exhibition." The 
chapel looked its best, ornamented with beautiful floral decora- 
tions. Over the platform, surrounded with paintings and crayon 
sketches from Lasell's flourishing Art Department, hung their 
motto, "Esse quam videri." 

The delicately-tinted programmes scattered throughout the au- 
dience gave some hint of "the good things coming." 

The exercises began, were ended, and frequently interspersed 
with very entertaining music, both vocal and instrumental. Miss 
Darling's essay came first, spicy, full of fun, and enjoyed by all. 
Moved with compassion by her sad experience, we determined that 
when we shall have become old ladies, we will none of us hurl "prov- 
erbs" at poor, defenceless school-girls. 

Miss Dunsmore came next. Her essay on "The Bright Side of 
Troubles" was lull of interest and good cheer. 

Miss Emerson's essay on the subject of "True Heroes" was 
well written, and showed that her estimate of true worth is a cor- 
rect one. 

Miss Linscott followed with her essay on "Jewels," full of fine 
thought, well expressed. 

The last essay on the programme was Miss White's. She took 
for her subject "The Intellectual Conquest of Rome by Greece," 
and treated it in a most masterly manner. 

We predict for this class, guided by their noble motto, a suc- 
cessful and brilliant future. 



fostig i Cities iai Aalavei 301. 

We gladly reprint the following from the "Advertiser," and the 
more so, because we modestly assume to be the first Institution to 
find out Mr. Stoddard's rare abilities in this very direction, and 
make use of them for school work : 

Mr. John L. Stoddard, of Boston, has just favored Abbott Acad- 
emy, at Andover, with some interesting and valuable lectures on 
European and Oriental cities. The lectures were four in number. 
The subjects were Venice, Florence, Paris, Cairo. On themes so 
hackneyed Mr. S. fascinated his select auditory, and gave an aes- 
thetic surprise to teachers and pupils and the few ladies and gen- 
tlemen outside who were so fortunate as to be present. 

Mr. Stoddard possesses many of the qualifications of an orator. 
His person is elegant. His voice is rich and sympathetic. His 
elocution combines distinctness and delicacy with manly force. 
In his action you see something of the ease and life of the an- 
tiques which he brings before his auditors photographically. Nor 
is he less gifted mentally. His word-painting of desert and der- 
vish has touches reminding of Taine or Stanley. There is an 
atmosphere about his sentences. He has mastered the best school 
of German art-criticism before praising or blaming famous pictures. 
If not fertile in original thought, his mind shows at least rare 
quickness of observation, and no less rare aptitude in research. 
He has the art of citation at the exact moment needed. He plays 
on the keys of sentiment with the brilliancy of an artist. The 
hour you roam with him through gallery and grot is an hour of 
new insight into the beauty, the pathos, the humor, the grandeur, 
and the mystery of alien climes and civilizations. 

Such a speaker need only to be heard to be appreciated. We 
congratulate other schools on the prospect of listening to him, 
and & Mr. Stoddard himself on the career opening so invitingly be- 
fore his young manhood. A Hearer. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



lotllifi Li glits. 

Perhaps at no time during the year have the lovers of star- 
gazing at Lasell been so excited as on the evening of May first. 

The following account I obtained from a participant in the ob- 
servation. 

She had just decided to accept a most pressing invitation from 
Morpheus to accompany him to dream-land, when a wild chorus 
of exclamations, such as " What is it ? What can it be ? " greeted 
her ears. Sin; listened more intently; but all was silence, until a 
voice, made doubly ominous by the silence which preceded it, 
cried : "Girls, the world is coming to an end!" This bit of news 
caused a slight ripple of excitement to cross over her previously 
calm mind, and she at once decided to look out upon the cause of 
the commotion. As she approached the place of observation, one 
intelligent glance revealed all, and she exclaimed with some de- 
gree of scorn : "What a ridiculous excitement over such a com- 
mon phenomenon ! It is nothing but Northern lights in the South." 
This intelligent speech satisfied their excited minds, and dispelled 
all fears as to the near approach of the destruction of this terrestrial 
ball. The excited party hastily dispersed, and our friend retraced 
her steps to her couch. But in her haste she failed to notice the 
rocking chair, which had placed itself in rather a challenging 
position. The encounter might be summed up briefly as follows : 
She came; they met ; it conquered. The struggle was sudden, 
but pointed ; and as her room-mate tenderly assisted her from the 
floor, she merely remarked that she had always thought the Dan- 
bury News' description of an encounter with a rocking chair ex- 
aggerated, but now she was fully satisfied that its half was not 
told. 

Since the accident, she has improved rapidly, so that it is hoped 
she will be able to be out in about three weeks. At the close of 
my interview with her, she said she would like to seize this 
opportunity of informing the public in general, and those seven young 
astronomers in particular, that if they ever in the future wished 
to call her forth to explain Northern, yes, or Southern lights in 
the middle of the night, she would be very much obliged if they 
would make known their intentions beforehand, so that she might 
have time to suspend the rocking chair from the window. It was 
sad enough to be aroused from peaceful slumbers to deliver a lec- 
ture upon lights ; but that the most impudent of all chairs should 
take it upon itself to show her war, was indeed too much. 



Fksqd&Is, 

It gives us pleasure to state that Miss Converse has so far re- 
covered from her illness as to be able to visit her home. 

We have lately been favored with visits from students of former 
years. Miss Gilmore and Miss Smith, of the class of "76, and 
Miss Sanders, were recently with us a short time. It is certainly 
encouraging to see those of our number who have gone out into 
the world, and to hear of the progress they are making. 

The latest version of "Mary had a little lamb" is "Little 
Mary had the measles." 

We regret that Miss Bacon, who has been with us for a 
short time pursuing her art studies, has gone away. 

Miss Anna Curry is anticipating with great joy a visit from her 
father in June. Those who have seen his beaming countenance 
will be glad to meet him again. 

All persons wishing their tight boots stretched, please call at 
No. 33, where they will receive general satisfaction. 



Although so late in the year, we are glad to welcome to our 
number Misses Adams and Bowen, and are glad to hear that the 
latter intends to continue her studies here for some years. 

It pains us to state that no longer will the familiar voice of Mrs. 
Wiggins ring through our corridors, waking us from our Saturday 
morning slumbers, with the resounding cry : "Sheets! sheets!" 
Henceforth her labors are demanded in another field. 

We hear that Miss Kiser, one of the senior class, is intending 
to visit friends in Portland before leaving for her home in the 
West. 

The organ-grinders are filling our land with music ; and we 
regret that this branch of art is not better appreciated by Prof. 
Kelley, who was very much annoyed by one of the artists while 
giving his lessons on Thursday. 

In the dining hall, Thursday morning, many disappointed faces 
were seen, on account of the storm which was raging, which pre- 
vented the anticipated moonlight row. 

The Misses Kendig have changed their residence to Worcester, 
and we wish them much happiness in their new home. 

Found — An ancient relic : a black fan, marked with gilt hiero- 
glyphics. The owner may obtain it by calling at the " Forum," 
proving property, and paying for this advertisement. 

For the benefit of our lady readers, we state that the latest rage 
in fancy work — Shetland wool shawls — seems abating. Had it 
lasted much longer, R. H. Macy, of New York, would soon have 
become a millionaire. 

Much credit is due to Miss Magoun for her courage in attempt- 
ing the difficult study of Greek with no classmate to sustain her 
in time of need, but we have no doubt she will be as successful 
in this as in everything else she has undertaken. 

The looks of distress which overspread the faces of the graduat- 
ing class tell us that their minds are much agitated on the subject 
of essays. 

(ESTABLISHED 1847.) 

AARON R. GAY & CO., 

130 STATE STREET, BOSTON, 

Statinon and Blank look Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 



THOMAS D. COOK, 

AGENT FOR THE 

NEW ENGLAND ICE CREAM CO. 

AND 

CAWRBCR, 

No. 8 PROVINCE COURT, BOSTON. 
Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at very Reasonable Rates. 



Wedding and other Parties served with care and promptness. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



CHARLES K. T. BLOOM, 

T^ILO R, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Mearly opposite Summer St. BOSTON. 

JPltlNTIKKi OFFICE, <fcc, FOB SALE. 
I'riiiting Office, Novelty Octavo Press, 25 fonts stand- 
ard new styles of type, etc. Price $75 cash, worth double. 
tienuine Confederate SIOOO Bonds and Con- 
federate Bills, and Old Coins cheap. A note for $100, 
25 cents. 
Scroll and visiting cards, any style, 25 cents per pack. 

ERNEST K. PACKARD, So. Boston, Mass. 

WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington Street, Boston, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 
and I'iano Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 
Cantatas of '-Ruth" and "Joseph." Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

•W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



DR. A. W. WHITNEY, 

WEST NTEWTON. 

"CARBIAGES." 

We have a large stock 0/ seasonable and 

FAIVIII-Y CARRIAGES 

AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

112 SUDBURY ST., BOSTON. 

F. E. CROCKETT, M. D, 

HOMEOPATHIST, 

Besidence, Washington Street, opp. Elm Street, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Office hours, before Si A.M., 1-3 and 7-8 P.M. 

NICHOLjS cfc X3I^^.I_iT_i 7 

Publishers, "Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
.IIWHSTGr BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. O. Address, Auburndale. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

WEST IDtfB^WTOUST -A-INia -A.TTB'U'St ISmAI^E], 
DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair and Drain Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

C SARGEWT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 
night. 

GEO. W. DEAN & CO., 

.?ONi(P frails I ffroduee, 

13 & 15 Merchants Row, 
BOSTON. 



JOHN HANCOCK 
^iutukl L(ife Ii^trfkude Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Has Accumulated Assets Exceeding $2,650,000, 



GEORGE THORNTON, President. 

GEO. B. WOODWARD, Secretary 

CHARLES G. WOOD, Treasurer 

SAMUEL ATHERTON Vice-President 

J. C. WHITE Medical Examiner 

SAMUEL WELLS Counsel 

PRANK M. HAY DEN, . . . . Supervisor of Agents 

BOSTON XfBAB CO. 

(Incorporated in 1829.) 

J. M. CHAD WICK & CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVER STREET, B03T0U , 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Mmlm 9mm libit® £@a3>, 

DRY AND GROUND IN OIL. 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure White Lead, both dry and ground in oil, we war- 
rant to be STRICTLY PURE, and guarantee that for Fine- 
ness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any Lead 
in the market, either foreign or American. 

*9f- In order to protect ourselves we have adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in the centre. This is on every package of 
our PUKE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO. 

"FUCEHT THE BEAD," 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because •/ originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURING PERMANENCE OP TONE. 

Warerooms, 481 Washington Street, BOSTON, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue Free. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS^ 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.X WHOLESAIiE AND RETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

fainter/ $tij>plie£, SftW Material^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 




FRANK E. PORTER, M. D. 

fsieioin mi Surgeon. 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases, and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street. Auburuelale. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

FOEEIG-N AND DOMESTIC FEUITS, 

Nuts, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c 
1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. FRANK E. RICHARDSON. 

FR.A.BJ5S "WOOD, 

STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bromfii-ld Street, BOSTON. 



Special attention given to College and School work. 

JOEL GOLDTHWAIT & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CAEPETINGS, 

Nos. 167 and 169 Washing-ton Street, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



BOSTON. 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



OLIVER DiTSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Sheet Music and Music Books, 

Pianos, Organs and Melodeons, 

451 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

NEW EN01LAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 
16,000 Pupils since 1S(>7. 50 eminent Professors. Best 
Methods. 115 hours tor $ 15.00. 

THE NORMAL INSTITUTE, 
A sea-side summer school, course elective. 70 Lecturers 
and Professors. Literary and Musical departments. 

Address, E. Toukjee, Music Hall, Boston, 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 
"Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 



^0£tOtt. 



J". IKHTnT O^TVILjIES cfe: SONS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers ill Fresh, Smokeil and Pickled 

CLjft.MS, OTSTEES cSc SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish sold on Commission. 

Stall: 121 & 123 Faneuil Hall Market, - - - - BOSTON. 

J. Knowles. R. H. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 

SWAIST <3c INTEWTON, 

DEALERS in 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 



No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 



HENRY SWAN, 
S. B. NEWTON. 



BOSTON. 



AFBIIBKDALE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding Stable. 

Also, Auburndale & Boston Express. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE 



NEW-YORK 

I<ife Ii\^ufciT\(5e Com pan y } 

346 & 348 Broad-way, New York. 



MORRIS FRANKLIN, WILLIAM H. BEERS, 

President. Vice-President & Actuary. 

Established 1845. Purely Mutual- 



ASSETS, $35,000,000.00 



BOSTON BRANCH OFFICE: 

Congress Building, 4 Post-Office Square, 
STOCKING & AUSTIN, Managers. 



JAMES W. KIDNEY, 

^^y mm* 

Mechanics' Exchange, 33 & 35 Hawley St. 



Order Box 294. 



B O ST OCT. 



Edge-Stones Set; Streets, Places, Private 

Avenues, and all kinds of Plain and 

Fancy Paving done promptly. 

EVERY VARIETY OF PAVING MATERIALS FURNISHED, IF DESIRED, 

Attention given to the building of Kailroad Tracks. 

4©"Mr. Kidney can be found at the Exchange, between 
the hours of 12 and 1. 

$100 SAVED is $ioo EARNED 

The above amount can be SAVED by every 
family IN one YEAR, by purchasing their gro- 
ceries at the mammoth store of 

C I>. COBB & BROTHERS, 

722, 726 and 728 Washington St. 

For the past thirty years our motto has been 
large sales and small profits, and our con- 
stantly increasing trade is sufficient guarantee 
that our efforts in that line have proved a success. 

Examine our Prices. What $1.00 Will Buy! 

3 pounds Prime Oolong Tea $1 00 

H " French Breakfast Coffee, ... l 00 

10 " corn Starch 1 00 

10 " Silver Gloss Starch, l 00 

12 '• Flake Tapioca l 00 

10 " Pearl Tapioca l 00 

10 " Pearl Sago, 1 00 

20 " canada oat meal, 1 00 

25 " frksh hominy, 1 00 

25 " Samp, 1 00 

17 " Prime Carolina Rice l 00 

40 " Yellow Bolted Meal 1 00 

14 " Choice Dried Apples, 1 00 

15 " Choice Prunes, l 00 

13 Quarts Best Medium Beans, 1 00 

10 " best Pea keans, 1 00 

10 " Split Peas, 1 00 

25 Pounds Prime Popping Corn, l 00 

12 Tumblers pure Fruit Jellies, 1 00 

5 2% lb. Bars Aknold's Standard Extra 

Soap 1 00 

5 21/2 lb. Bars Curtis Davis' Extra Soap, . 1 00 

10 Bars American Peerless Soap 1 00 

14 Bars Babbitt's Uest soap 1 00 

10 Bars Babbitt's N. Y. City Soap, .... 1 00 

10 Cakes Imported Castile Soap 1 00 

Don't fail to give us a call before purchasing. 
All goods packed in strong cases and delivered 

FREE 100 MILES. 

Call and get, or send for, catalogue of goods 
with prices, which will give full particulars. 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

PRINCIPAL WAREHOUSE, 

Nos. 722, 726 & 728 Washington St., Boston. 

BRANCH STORES: 140 Hanover, cor. Union St., Boston. 

1311 and 1313 Washington Street, Boston. 2235 

Washington St.. Hoston. Cor. Main & 

Milk Sts., Westboro'. 145 & 147 

Main St., Fitchburg. 



THE BEST PLACE 



TO buy 



FURNITURE 



IS AT 



PAINE'S MANUFACTORY, 



48 GAJSTJ^IL, STREET, 



BOSTON. 



COLLIER & PERKINS, 

Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

ENGRAVINGS, CHR0M0S, 

Frames, Stereoscopes and Views, 

VELVET FRAMES & PASSEPARTOUTS, 

^LOTJLIDIlsrOS, 

And every Article desired by the Picture Dealer and 
Frame Maker. 

361 WASHINGTON STREET, 

3 Doors North of Bromfield St. BOSTON. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



MASS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

• Goods delivered free of charge. 



J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH, AND 162 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, 



AND 



Auburn Strest, Auburndale, 



^ *_ 



DEALERS IN 



"J WW* 



"9 



AND 



GROCERIES 



AT 



Ijoxvest 3VH£tx-l5L©t 3P:r±o©s. 



Send for Catalogue of Prices. 



NEW DRUG ST ORE ! 

The subscribers would inform the residents of Au- 
burndale and vicinity that they have opened a 

DRUGSTORE, 

In the new building adjoining their Grocery store, on 
Auburn Street, facing Grove, and will keep on hand 
a Fresh Stock of 

PURE DRUGS, 
CHEMICALS, 

PATENT MEDICINES, 

TOILET ARTICLES, &c. 

This Department is under the management of 
MR. BRUSH, an apothecary of large experience. 
Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed at all 
hours, from purest and best drugs. 

J". VICKERS Sc CO., 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

ABRAM FRENCH & CO. 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods 
and Plated Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET. 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. Wells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
Wm. A. French. 
S. Waldo French. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Artlits' Material! 



NOS. 33 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



T ZE3I IE 



Mil iUHMCTira COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. 
R. Eager, of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of 

The " Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 

39 KINGSTON ST., 

mmmwmm® 





X3XJZX. ^zEnvnisr^. pacti. 



Volume II 



LASELL SEMINARY, JUNE, 1877. 



Number 5. 



A GREAT BUSINESS. 

The luxury of carpets, though in Eastern life older 
even than houses, is in a comparative novitiate with 
our Western civilization. The latter saw little of it 
until Le Grande Monarque grafted the Turkish pro- 
duct on French taste ; and, as late as the days of Queen 
Mary, Royalty itself did not refuse rush matting. When 
inventive genius, impelled by the first Napoleon, 
brought forth the Jacquard loom, and the workmen of 
Lyons rose tb crush the new invader of their indus- 
tries, it was thought that the acme of improvement was 
reached; but it remained for Yankee ingenuity to give 
its last and mightiest stimulus. 

A half a century ago, a Boston man made an appli- 
cation of the power-loom to ingrain and other carpets, 
which had been despaired of in Europe; and, in a brief 
space, his establishment at Lowell, Mass., turned ou 
more work, in less time, and of better quality, than any 
other in the world. Our modern machinery makes now 
a thousand stitches while the nimble fingers of Asiatic 
maidens are making one. The new-born industry 
naturally drew with it trading-houses worthy of its 
magnitude, and one outgrowth in Boston was that of 
Jolm H. Pray, Sons & Co., by far the oldest in New 
England, and one of the largest in America. 

They are the most extensive dealers in Lowell car- 
pets, and have many advantages in being the sole pro- 
prietors of certain patterns. But their trade embraces 
also every variety, foreign as well as home-made, and 
extends to every State of the Union. Some idea of it 
may be had from the fact that the wholesale alone 
amounts to a million and a half annually, and, with the 
retail, over two millions, which is more than all the 
carpet business of Massachusetts when their house was 
founded. 

A visit to their great establishment, 558 and 560 
Washington Street, will give some conception of the 
quantity and quality of the goods passing through this 
establishment every year. One secret of the success of 
the house is that the public get the full benefit of its 
experience and immense advantages in purchasing 
stock; and as I. W. Adams, a member of the firm, who 
has made their purchases for twenty years, entirely re- 
lizes "goods well bought are half sold," the benefit 
is a mutual one. 

Here may be had every style and quality, from the 
neat, unpretentious oil cloth, to the luxurious Imperial 
Brussels; the linoleum, soft and durable; those com- 
pounds of Scotch economy and American skill, ingrains 
of every grade and pattern, the velvety and enticing 
Wilton, the rich and tasteful Axminsters, tapestry, in 
workmanship and harmony worthy of the Gobelins, 
cardinal velvets of cruciform design and shades suitable 
for the sanctuary; and all at prices so reasonable that 
the mechanic of to-day may enjoy what the monarch 
of the last century might envy. 

The conscientious purpose of the firm is to give the 
public nothing but what is trustworthy and fair in 
quality and price. On no other basis could a business 
continue as this has, for more than half a century, in- 
tact, and, in spite of the fires and financial depressions 
and public and private vicissitudes of two generations, 
constantly increase. 

Their career is like a grand Turkish carpet, all of a 
piece, with integrity for its central design, and enter- 
prise for its ever-extending border. That the warp of 
their energy and the woof of their stability may endure 
with inter woven taste and attractiveness, is something 
which those who admin; what is genuine and honest in 
these times of sham and shoddy, should, by hearty pat- 
ronage, promote. 



Mira W. Sweet. 



Editor — Annie H. White. 

Assistant Editors : 

~L\z7.\Ti, Emerson. 



Cora Flint. 



Publishers : 



Cora Flint. 



Carrie Kendig. 



Another volume has been added to the accumulated lore of the Lasell Leaves. 
The present number rounds out the editorial labors of one more year. 

In reviewing 1 the results of those labors, we are gratified to discover on every 
hand evidences that they have left their impress upon the literature of the age. 

Many things have appeared in the columns of this journal which the world will 
not willingly let die. Its criticisms in the sphere of art and letters have never 
failed to command the assent of the elite. 

We are happy also to observe that its predictions in the political world have 
been verified. Statesmen have been glad to adopt our theories. Seekers for 
reform have profited by the promulgation of our views. Poets have found inspira- 
tion in our columns. 

Thus we may lay down the editorial pen, and retire with justifiable pride and 
self-satisfaction ; but we cannot forget that not alone do we retire ; writers and 
readers, editors and patrons, — we have been schoolmates together. 

The months of a school year have swiftly flown, since for the first time we 
gathered here. Hardly have we learned to value rightl3 T and enjoy the varied 
pleasures of our happy home before we are reminded that " Pleasures brighten as 
they take their flight." 

Together, here, we have watched the glorious hues of Autumn fade into the 
sober shades of Winter; and, in turn, the snows of Winter melt before the breath 
of Spriug. Now, when the singing of birds is come, and buds are swelling into 
blossoms, we are called upon to bid good-bye to each other and to Lasell. We 
met as strangers, we part as friends ; but the sadness of the hour is, that to some 
of us the parting is for aye. 

When, after summer's rest and recreation, the students of Lasell shall assemble 
for another year, familiar faces will be missing. Some of us will have filled the 
page of school-life, and turned to a fresh, white leaf whereon to inscribe the ex- 
periences of the future; and some of us who will not have filled the page of school 
life will be found in the pursuits of active life. Standing thus on the eve of 
separation, we can but look back over the past with mingled feelings of satisfaction 

and regret. 

The year we have spent together we know has been one of enjoyment ; we hope 
it has also been one of profit. The lessons learned will not soon be forgotten. 
The friendships formed will not soon lose their influence. We have been taught 
to see that in this pursuit after wisdom there is no fixed goal on earth ; that all 
these lessons learned and successes achieved are but mile-stones on the way, 
pointing ever forward to the perfect knowledge that shall be gained hereafter. 
May each one of us take this lesson home to heart, and, 

" Still achieving, still pursuing, 
Learn to labor and to wait." 

And here, with thanks to our kind patrons, congratulation to ourselves, and good 
wishes for our successors, we make our bow — editorial — and retire. 



LASELL LEA VES. 



Mtlig II© OMIiiii to Bed. 

Many are the pages, of both prose and verse, that have been 
written on this subject; and you have all probably been many 
times enraptured by the eloquence with which authors describe 
the manner in which the children's snowy eyelids droop beneath 
the influence of "sleep, balmy sleep," and "tired nature's sweet 
restorer" invites them to visit the land of dreams, and so forth, 
and so forth, ad infinitum. 

Now, I have come to the conclusion that those writers have 
either had very little experience in the art, or, having had too 
much experience, wish to delude some other unfortunates into a 
trial of this delightful occupation. I am inclined to think the 
former supposition the true one, for I am loth to accuse anyone of 
such base deception as is implied in the alternative. 

My experience, I regret to say, is not like anything of which I 
have ever read, and is so frightful that I almost dread to recall it ; 
but because of my interest in the welfare of humanity, which for- 
bids me to see it deceived, I make myself a martyr, and put it 
before the world. 

Two years ago, I one day received a note from a married friend 
of mine, saying that, on account of the illness of her sister, she 
was obliged to be away from home for a day or so, and asking 
me if I would do her the favor of staying at her house during her 
absence, to look after her children. Of course, I was very willing 
to oblige her, for she said her children — three in number, the 
eldest being a boy of five years — were the best in the world. 
My observations in that direction had been rather limited ; but I 
felt sure that even if they were not the best, they were certainly 
not the worst. 

The appointed morning found me at the residence of my friend 
in the best of spirits. After many injunctions not to let Johnny 
eat green apples, stick his fingers in baby's eyes, fall into the 
pond, or climb to the top of the house by means of the lightning- 
rods, she departed, leaving me, I must confess, a little bewildered 
with trying to remember what he was not to do. 

That boy was enough to destroy the patience of a more patient 
person than myself; but, although I was four times obliged to 
change his clothes because of his fondness for lying down on the 
ground and playing he was a snake; though he cut his finger, 
broke my watch-crystal, threw his playthings into the pond, and 
put a caterpillar on my neck ; and though Mabel several times 
fell down stairs, swallowed half-a-dozen buttons, stuck pins into 
her brother's arm, and commanded me, when I had reached a most 
interesting crisis in my novel, to make her doll a hat, I kept 
tolerably calm, comforting myself with the thought that bedtime 
was approaching. After tea, the baby's nurse coolly informed me 
of her intention to spend the evening out, assuring me, in re- 
sponse to my inquiries, that the baby never woke at night. At 
seven o'clock I said : " Come, children, it is time to go to bed." 
After repeating that statement several times, and receiving no 
reply, 1 went in search of them, and found them busily engaged 
in tying a tin dipper to the cat's tail. The poor creature seemed 
to be accustomed to such treatment, for she kept perfectly quiet 
until I released her, when she fled with all possible celerity. 
After remonstrating with them for their cruelty, I ventured to re- 
peat my remark that it was time for them to go to bed. It was 
greeted with a succession of deafening shrieks ; but, with promises 
of stories and candy, I finally persuaded them to comply with my 
wishes. The gymnastic performances which those children went 
through during the process of disrobing were certainly astonish- 
ing; but the amount of candy they were capable of containing was 



even more so. After considerable exertion, I succeeded in getting 
them into bed, and found that my trouble had only begun ; for I 
was immediately commanded to sing, which I meekly did until 
they made known their desire for a story. I mildly suggested the 
propriety of their going to sleep; but they, in turn, informed me 
that they didn't want to. I was beginning to wonder where the 
poetry of our proceedings was coming in, and almost came to the 
conclusion that it would be necessary to give "tired nature's 
sweet restorer" a little assistance in the shape of a good spank- 
ing. But, fearful of producing an effect which might wake the 
baby, I desisted; and after exhausting my stock of songs, stories, 
and Mother Goose rhymes, I had the satisfaction of seeing them 
reluctantly fall asleep, and, observing the time, found that I had 
been more ^than two hours in accomplishing this feat of " putting 
the children to bed." I felt a slight inclination to drowsiness, 
but, being anxious to have my heroine rescued from the perilous 
situation in which I had left her, sat down to read. I "had perused 
about a page, when, hark! what sound is that salutes my ears? 
Is it? Yes, — from the cradle proceeds a rustling, which gradually 
increases, until an ear-splitting yell breaks upon the air, and — • 
baby is awake. I seize the bundle of flannel from its place, shake 
it around, holding it up side down in my frantic endeavors to find 
its head. Indignant at such treatment, it screams louder than 
ever, and for the next half hour I pace the floor with that wiggling, 
shrieking bundle in my arms, my mind being occupied with con- 
jectures as to the substance of which babies' lungs are composed. 
I can go no farther. I often wonder that my hair did not turn 
white that night; and now, nothing will make a cold chill go 
creeping over me quicker than to speak of "putting the children 
to bed." 



The coming winter is to be the coldest experienced for forty 
years. Prepare for it in good season, by calling on Waters & 
Inman. 

These Leaves can bear witness to the excellency of P. Wood 
as a printer. 

Shakspeare says, " Nothing is either good or bad, but thinking 
makes it so." The groceries furnished by Cobb & Co. do not 
depend on the "thinking " of anybody for their excellence. We, 
the students of Lasell, try them every day. Whatever our par- 
ticular mood of thought may be, the sugar never fails to mollify 
the tea, and the tea is the real extract of refreshing, exhilarating 
leaves. In the matter of leaves, we don't care if the compliment 
is reciprocated. 

At 13 and 15 Merchants Row, Boston, you can find fruit equal 
to that which grew in the Garden of the Hesperides, and guarded 
by a Dean instead of a dragon. 

This portion of the country may, in the course of time, be the 
subject of another geologic convulsion. When it happens, and 
another race occupies our place, they will be digging up articles 
stamped: "French & Co., Plumbers," and placing them in 
museums as evidences of the high attainment of their pre- 
decessors in art and skill. 

We know whereof we do affirm, when we say that the poultry 
sold by Swan & Newton affords infinite satisfaction. 

The stationery procurable at 130 State St., Boston, is, to use 
our favorite expression, "Gay." 

Our last by a mistake located Wadsworth Bros. & Howland al 
34 India Street. They are, as their advertisement states, at TC 
Washington Street. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



The young ladies are very grateful to Mr. Longfellow for the 
beautiful poem which he gave and dedicated to Lasell. 

Why should the young ladies of Lasell be particular about 
their looks? Because they always have a beau in (Bowen) the 
house. 

At the last sociable we were honored by the presence of two of 
■our old pupils : Miss Tower and Miss Haven. 

We are greatly enjoying the flowers this spring, which adorn 
the Seminary grounds ; especially the lilies-of-the-valley, which 
we are forbidden to touch. 

Our halls were brightened, not long since, by the faces of three 
young gentlemen, friends of Miss Ferguson. 

One of the little girls at Lasell was heard to remark, that if Mr. 
D., who visited us not long ago, was a representative of the Bos- 
ton University, she wished they would represent often. We fully 
agree with her. 

Why was there no necessity of inviting Professor P. to lecture 
on "Pottery" ? Because we have a Potter among us. 

We are glad to see Miss Carter around again, after her recent 
illness. 

The young ladies expect to greatly enjoy the sail down the har- 
bor, which has been postponed until next fall; especially those 
who do not return. 

Professor B. is no doubt delighted with the warm weather, as 
by it the "young women" are obliged to do away with crimps. 

Right over opposite 

Lives a young man, 
Who flirts with the " Sems " 

As hard as he can. 

The new matting greatly improves the corridors of the Sem- 
inary. 

Why is Lasell the beginning of evil ? Because Adam's among 
us. 

Mrs. Carpenter made a short visit, not long since, to Troy, 
N. Y. ; we were glad it was short, for our home circle at Lasell 
seems sadly incomplete without her. 

For the benefit of her composition classes, Miss Cushman has at 
much cost procured the services of Mr. John Bragdon, to give 
lessons in bowing. If the young ladies follow his example, it will 
be a move in the right direction. 

While passing this building last evening, two young gentlemen 
were observed gazing intently at the stars, in the direction of the 
Seminary. We are charmed to perceive a love of astronomical 
lore in those of so tender an age. 

We take pleasure in informing our friend, the Boston Post, that 
we do not need party platforms in the curriculum of Lasell to 
make us, as we are, staunch Republicans. We were early trained 
in the way we should go, and now we are old shall not depart 
from it; the threatening prophecy of our Cassandra-playing not- 
withstanding. By the way, though, you did that very handsome- 
ly, Mr. Editor. 

"Is that clock right over there?" asked a visitor. "Right 
over there ?" said the boy. " 'Taint nowhere else." 



Beware of puffs ! Particularly of the kind which sometimes 
come to us in the form of school catalogues. 

My dislike for them was greatly increased not many months 
ago, when it was decided that I should go to boarding-school. 
As soon as the fact became known, the catalogues began to arrive 
— and such a collection! 

At once I selected a "centennial brown" covered one, but my 
guardian, who is not as fond of centennial colors as myself, de- 
cided he had found one- which suited him better. Upon inquiry, 
he was surprised to learn that the catalogue, like the picture of 
the building on its cover, was the design of the school when com- 
pleted. 

I was discouraged, but one day my eyes happened to fall upon 
a modest, white-covered pamphlet, and, glancing at the picture on 
its cover, I decided that it came within the range of common 
sense to believe such a building existed. 

To be brief, it was arranged that my next school year should be 
spent at Lasell. I write these few words, thinking, perhaps, to 
save some young friend from passing through this same ordeal ,' 
such as reading long addresses given by presidents, subject : 
Woman's Sphere ; puzzling over names of the members of facul- 
ties, with titles worse than their names; and being lost in admi- 
ration over pictures of magnificent buildings, which remind one 
of the Old World cathedrals, until you are coolly informed that 
this view is an exact representation of the edifice, except that the 
tower and the right wing are not built yet, and the grounds are 
yet to be laid out. 

Yes ! I have been through it all ; and, to-day, sitting in my 
cozy room at Lasell, I thank the good fairy who attracted my at- 
tention to the white-covered catalogue bearing the name of this 
institution. 

I hope, as our Leaves are blown by kindly winds over the 
country, some young friend may read these words, and decide to 
become a member of our home circle in this delightful place 
among the hills of New England. 



A Hindoo died ; a happy thing to do, 

When fifty years united to a shrew. 

Released, he hopefully for entrance cries 

Before the gates of Brahma's Paradise. 
" Hast been through Purgatory? " Brahma said. 
" I have been married ! " — and he hung his head. 
"Come in, come in, and welcome, too, my son; 

Marriage and Purgatory are as one." 

In bliss extreme he entered Heaven's door, 

And knew the peace he ne'er had known before. 

He scarce had entered in the gardens fair, 

Another Hindoo asked admission there. 

The self-same question Brahma asked again, — 
"Hast been through Purgatory?" "No ; what then?" 
"Thou canst not enter!" did the god reply. 
" He who went in was there no more than I." 
"All that is true, but he has married been, 

And so on earth has suffered for all sin." 
" Married? 'tis well, for I've been married twice!" 

"Begone! we'll have no fools in Paradise!" 

— N. Y. Post. 



We are pleasantly reminded now-a-days of that saying of the 
quaint old doctor : " Doubtless the Lord could have made a better 
berry than the strawberry, but doubtless he never did." 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Hit Gflau, 

♦ 
What cheers this drear earth's deepest gloom, 
Floods with glory the sad sick-room, 
Dispels all fears, removes all pains, 
Depriving dread More of his wonted gains ? 

Blue Glass! 

What fills with ideas the weakest brain, 
E'en makes it like storehouse bursting with grain? 
What causes the old, like glad children, to crow, 
As it makes, on bald places, the hair to grow? 

Blue Glass ! 



An official journal, issued at St. Petersburg, is reported to have 
said, " Diplomacy had better not pronounce in favor of any defi- 
nite plan for the termination of the war, until decisive events 
have occurred on the battle-field." 

Is it possible that even a thought of decisive events nan have 
entered the Russian mind ? Then, indeed, is there cause for re- 
joicing at an astonishing stride taken by affairs in the country of 
the Czar. The Russ may go on waiting until ''ready to move in 
force; " the Turk may go on "dreaming of the hour" when 
Russia shall ti'emble at his power. We are content if a vague 
idea of real warfare has been suggested. 

These two countries remind us of nothing so much as of the old 
story concerning the 

" Two cats in Kilkenny, 
Each of which thought there was one cat too many ; " 

and the condition in which affairs have been for the past years 
leads us to imagine that their fates may be identical, — 

" They scratched and they bit, 
Till, instead of two cats, there weren't any." 



A few more days of duty, a few more hours of study, and 
another year of school life will be recorded with the past ; and 
our faces will be turned North, South, East and West, toward 
that dear resting-place, home. 

The beautiful seasons in their bright round have each brought 
their gifts of happiness to us ; the same blue arch that hung over 
us at the commencement of the year still o'ershadows us ; the 
same stars that glittered so brightly are still twinkling at twi. 
light's gentle hour ; and still we remain, not the same in all 
respects, we trust, but improved morally, intellectually and 
socially. 

While we have been gathering fruit from the tree of knowledge, 
friendships have been formed that shall bind heart to heart with 
cords of love and sympathy, so strong that all the trials and 
sorrows of our future lives will be powerless to break them. 

Can we not say that the past year has been one of joy to most 
of our number? And as we look back to those first long days 
and longer nights when our home-sickness found relief in tears, 
can we but laugh at our weakness ? 

Hereafter, it will ever be a source of pleasure to remember 
with esteem and gratitude the kind indulgences and care of our 
teachers. Although there is, of course, not one of us at all 
anxious to go home, we have been taught so well to obey the 
rules of school that, as this institution is advertised to close on 
the 17th instant, we are ready to leave without a murmur, and 
take all our baggage with us. 



Dear old Lasell ! how lonesome you will be when your halls 

resound no longer to the busy feet and merry voices of sixty 

young women! But do not mourn ; for the mason, the carpenter, 

and painter will pay their annual visit, and from them you will 

receive such care as shall cause you to look more attractive than 

ever. How relieved our teachers will feel when the last one of us 

is gone, and they can lay aside their watchful care, together with 

the pencils employed heretofore in making such fearfully black 
marks. 

Yet all this bustle and joy of " going home" will be tinged with 

shades of sadness, for many of us part here to meet no more ; 

many associations here formed will be broken ; some cords knit 

will be forever snapped asunder ! Those of us who assemble here 

at the commencement of another year will sadly miss the smiling 

faces and kind words of some who now bid us adieu ; but we shall 

remember with pleasure the happy days of the present year, and 

look forward with bright hope to the future. 



IWKUL 

Thehe are many sad words in our language. 

Which bring to the human heart pain; 
But what sadder than those of parting, 

And, too, " Shall we e'er meet again?" 

But blessed assurance is given us, 
A promise of meetings to come; 

Though we meet not again in this life-time, 
We've another when this one is done. 

So we know, although years may part us 
From father, or mother, or friend, 

A year's but a sand of eternity ; 
A life but a span to the end. 

Family circles here may be broken, 
The hearts left be bleeding and torn ; 

But the circle there never is severed, 
And the robes of rejoicing are worn. 

This world is a world full of partings, 
Of good-byes to those whom we love ; 

But God heals the wounds of our sorrow 
With balm from the regions above. 



Every pleasure must have an end, wise men say. As an ad- 
ditional proof of the fact, the course of lectures delivered before 
us by Mr. James T. Fields is, much to our regret, concluded. 

In these lectures instruction and entertainment have been de- 
lightfully blended. Mr. Fields has the happy faculty of convey- 
ing, under the guise of amusing anecdotes and lively sketches, a 
deal of information concerning the men of whom he speaks. 

While enjoying his humorous descriptions, we fail to realize at 
once what an insight we gain into the characters of those men of 
letters. 

In speaking of later writers, he has the advantage of a per- 
sonal acquaintance with many of the authors themselves, thus 
being able to present them to us as men, aside from their literary 
merits ; and we are brought to feel ourselves old friends of those 
whom heretofore we had known only through their productions. 
Mr. Fields is an adept in the use of the Queen's English, and his 
felicity of expression forms one of the chief charms of his lectures. 
Evenings spent in listening to him have been studies of our mother 
tongue with a most excellent teacher. His kindness in procuring 
and arranging for us the beautiful little memorial of Longfellow 
was not needed to make us enthusiastic students. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



The exercises of commencement week of our beloved Seminary 
commenced on Sunday, June 10th, with a Baccalaureate address 
by Miss Frances E. Willard, of Chicago, who has worked so 
effectually in the late Tabernacle service in Boston. The services 
were held in the Congregational church, which was kindly given 
up to the use of the school for that occasion. The body of the 
church was reserved for the pupils, who entered in procession. 
Rev. Mr. Cutler made the invocation. Special music was pre- 
pared for the occasion, and was very good. Rev. Dr. Latimer, 
Dean of the Theological School at the Boston University, made 
the prayer preceding the address, earnestly remembering all the 
interests of the Seminary. Miss Willard selected the fourteenth 
verse of the fourth chapter of Esther as her text, especially the 
latter clause: " And who knoweth whether thou art come to the 
kingdom for such a time as this ? " Women in the late Temper- 
ance Crusade at the West had taken this veree as their motto, and 
felt that, like Queen Esther, they were placed in circumstances 
that demanded prompt, decisive and independent action. The 
old theory which held women to the narrowness of a prescribed 
sphere is now nearly exploded, and women may generally find 
scope for their powers. At least one kingdom is open to them : 
the kingdom of good, honest hard work. Nature has no room for 
an idler, and sets the example of toil herself, working in every 
fibre of her being. Seeming repose is only the peace at the 
centre of universal agitation. 

Many fine examples of Christian workers were instanced, and the 
results of their labors were shown to be immensely greater than 
the efforts they had cost. Thus the lives of Francis Murphy and 
Jerry McCauley are widely useful. They are instances of men 
who have been rescued from prison, and helped to these high 
positions of Christian usefulness. The speaker strongly recom- 
mended the close study of the Bible to lead one out of worldly 
ambition up to spirituality of feeling. Ours is a kingdom of op- 
portunity. The laity now works, instead of leaving all Christian 
enterprise to the clergy. A field of action is never wanting to 
those who long for it. 

Miss Willard's personal address to the class was very earnest 
and pointed. She urged them to consider doing good as the real 
business of life, and find in it their happiness. She applied the 
text to them individually. Perhaps they, had come to the kingdom 
for such a time as this — a time when work is needed, when evil 
and suffering darken the land, and a time when woman finds her 
kingdom of enlarged usefulness. 

Monday morning began the three days' examination, most of 
which was done in writing, the papers being on exhibition for any 
interested guest. 

Monday evening was given to a musical rehearsal, for which 
the chapel was decorated with evergreens, flowers, and the 
pictures of the pupils in the Art Department, many of which do 
them honor. This rehearsal was under the direction of Profs. 
Harry Wheeler in the Vocal, and J. A. Hills in the Instrumental 
Departments. There was an organ solo by Miss Sawyer, piano 
solos by Misses Linscott and Magoun, and songs by Misses Duns- 
more, Magoun, Flint, Miller and Williams. Misses Stocking, 
Kendig and Ferguson sung " Sleep, noble child" in concert ; Miss 
Stocking performed a recitative and cavatina from Donizetti, and 
Miss Clark and Prof. Hills played a duet with two pianos very 
finelv. 

The term examinations were continued through the second day, 
and the evening was given to readings, recitations, and the per- 
formance of a cantata, founded on the old German story of 
" Snow-Drop," set to music by Reinecke. This was a very diffi- 
cult piece of music ; the solos finely rendered by Misses Stocking 
and Miller, while the chorus was given with much delicacy of 
expression. 

A piano solo was by Miss Ferguson, and a song by Miss Howe. 
The recitations and readings were by the Misses Holbrook, Con- 
verse, Eva Bragdon, Alberta Williams and Ella Stocking, all 
pupils of Prof. S. R. Kelley in elocution. 

Wednesday finished the term examinations, and the evening 
was devoted to an address from Rev. Dr. D. H. Wheeler, editor 



of the Methodist, in New York City. His subject was " Literary 
Art, which was admirably handled. He claimed that in all de- 
partments of art sex is unrecognized, so that a woman may excel 
if she has ability. So George Eliot and George Sand stand first 
in their respective nations in the departments which they repre- 
sent. 

Literature is a wider art than any other ; few pictures and fewer 
statues tell a full story. They generally need language to help 
them. Literature is the development of an advanced civilization. 
Literary art can hardly be defined. It unites all excellence. 
Letters may be artistic. Wayne McVeagh's to General Butler 
was a piece of consummate art. 

Literature should be expurged of all personality. It should be 
self-concealing, free from mannerism, accumulate every excellence, 
and cling to no specialties. There is no French poetry, because 
the early singers bound versification by strict rules. The parable 
of the Prodigal Son, the Pilgrim's Progress, and the best of 
Shakespeare are true art, free from personality, telling the simple 
story. The present time abounds in good writing, especially in 
England. 

Thursday morning was bright and beautiful for the exercises of 
commencement, and the chapel was crowded. Rev. Dr. Pierce, 
of the Zion's Herald, of Boston, made the opening prayer. Music 
was furnished by the Germania Band, of Boston. 

Of the four graduates, three take their diplomas in the scientific 
department, viz. : Misses Elizabeth Kiser, Keokuk, Iowa ; Nellie 
Grace Perkins, Gloucester, Mass., and Ida May Phillips, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. Miss Eva Newman Bragdon, Lima, N. Y., is graduat- 
ed by the classical department. 

The opening essay, by Miss Kiser, was upon " Latent Powers." 
She showed how the power of motion lay hid in the primeval 
chaos till evolved by the Divine fiat, when the revolution of the 
spheres began. Force is hidden in the sluggish reservoir of 
water, till some day it bursts its banks and destroys all within 
its reach ; so in fire is hidden a power, which, when it gains mas- 
tery, is irresistible ; so is power latent in the human body and 
soul. 

After music, Miss Perkins read an essay on " The Love of 
Novelty," which she believed to exist in every human being, and, 
at every stage of life, to act as a stimulant in every undertaking, 
whetting curiosity and advancing knowledge and growth. She 
made playful allusions to the " isms " of the day, especially in 
medicine. Blue glass came in for a touch of humor. 

Miss Phillips treated of " The Modern Griselda," taking up the 
gauntlet for her sex in a very lively manner. The ancient Gri- 
selda of whom Chaucer wrote was the type of womanhood in the 
eaiiy ages. She submitted unquestioningly to domestic. tyranny. 
The essayist was happy to believe that that sort of woman had 
ceased to exist. The modern Griselda has learned self-respect 
and is fast learning self-reliance. She is as tender, as true and as 
patient as her elder sister, but she does not willingly endure in- 
justice, and can protect herself. The golden age of woman is 
near at hand. 

The final essay was by Miss Bragdon. She had selected the 
class motto, "Post diem, dies alter,'''' as her subject, and she 
treated it in a way to prove that hope and anticipation are the 
chief incentives to progress. The thought of future successes is 
the motive that inspires action. No sooner is one goal reached 
than the eager desire presses towards the next. The close of 
school life is one of those goals, but it points forward with hope 
to future and higher labors and successes, which will find their 
highest in the heavenly home. Miss Bragdon, as well as her 
companions, did herself much credit in the manner of reading and 
clearness of utterance. 

The Principal, C. C. Bragdon, then presented the diplomas, and 
made a brief address to the graduates. He asked them what they 
would do with their diplomas. Some persons accept them as 
certificates of honorable discharge from all further effort; some as 
passports among the cultured. He besought them rather to 
receive them as the recruit does his certificate from a physician, 
as proof of soundness of condition and ability to bear arms. To- 
morrow consigns to-day's graduates to a wider drill with a higher 
sergeant, in the world's great field of labor. He advised them to 



6 



LASELL LEAVES. 



despise no drudgery, but to court honest toil, to escape from the 
frivolity that too often seduces women, to shun sentimental weak- 
ness and dependence falsely considered feminine, and to cultivate 
muscle of the moral and mental as well as physical sort. Oppor- 
tunity comes to all who long for it, and growth in strength results 
from labor. Patience is the measure of true strength. The 
Principal dismissed the class in full faith that they would maintain 
the honor of their Alma Mater henceforth and everywhere. The 
class then united with the school in singing a parting ode written 
by Miss Florence Moulton, set to music by Prof. J. A. Hills, and 
the Rev. Dr. Clark pronounced the benediction. 

Dinner was served at 1 o'clock on the broad lawn which 
surrounds the building. A tent was spread over the tables, while 
the company sat around on the green grass under the trees. All 
people from a distance were cordially invited to partake, and Mr. 
Cook from Boston, caterer, furnished the guests with an abundance 
of fruit and other edibles, for which the open air seemed to give 
everybody a keen relish. At_4_P, M. was held the third reunion 
oXthe Alumnae., at which the music as well as the literary enter- 
tainment was furnished by graduates of former years. Many 
former pupils were present besides the graduates. Many came 
with their husbands, who are admitted as honorary members. The 
chapel was well filled on this occasion also. The opening exer- 
cise was an organ solo by Mrs. Isabella G. Jennings Parker, of 
the class of '57. The same lady read the secretary's report, 
giving all the information that could be obtained concerning 
former graduates ; a varied history, though brief. There were 
some records of death, and a number showing advancement in 
artistic directions, especially in music. Mrs. Mary S. Thaxter 
Dennison, of the class of '64, played a piano solo from Chopin. 
Mrs. Flora E. Drew Sampson, of the class of '57, then read a 
metrical essay, "Reminiscences of Twenty Years Ago." She 
recalled very pleasantly in rhyme the school-day pleasures and 
tastes of twenty years ago. The poem prepared by Mrs. Rebecca 
P. Page Reed, of the class of '58, in her absence, was read by 
Mrs. Parker. It was called " Half Way," and was the tender 
and sweet thoughts of one who finds herself in mid life looking 
back unregrettingly on her lost youth, and forward in hope and 
faith towards that part of the pathway that leads to eternal life. 
A duet from Mendelssohn, admirably played upon two pianos, 
followed, and then the Alumnae sang the class hymn of '57, with 
slight alterations, to an organ accompaniment, which was the 
closing exercise of this very successful reunion. 

At the Trustees' meeting, in the afternoon, the Executive Com- 
mittee was requested to consider measures for adding a new. wing 
to the building, to accommodate thirty more pupils, as the in- 
crease of the school demands. 

The reception of the Principal, in the evening, was a happy 
ending to a bright day. There was a full attendance, and at this 
and other exercises, many friends of the school, and parents and 
friends of the pupils, were present. Among others we noticed 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs. A. B. Kendig, of 
Worcester ; Mesdames White and Sanford, of Brockton ; Mrs. 
Williams, from Washington, D. C; Mrs. Bacon, of New London ; 
Mrs. Clarke and daughter, from New York ; Mr. Magoun, of 
Bath, Me.; Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, of Gloucester, Mass.; Mr. Duns- 
more, of Greensburgh, Ind. Of former pupils, Miss Etta Ken- 
drick, Miss Anna King, Mrs. Cummings, from Denver, Miss Kitty 
Esty, of Framingham, and Miss Nellie Alderman, were a few 
whom we remember. Mr. M. S. Vail represented, with others, 
Boston University. 



Sickness flees abashed from the presence of the well-known 
F. E. Crockett, M. D. 

The young ladies of Lasell will testify to the faithfulness and 
promptness with which Lathrop's Express has served them. 

The fruit sold by Richardson & Co. is fast becoming a standard 
in comparison. 

The Dillingham Paper Co. is so well known and appreciated 
that a word of commendation from us would be superfluous. 



Would you be made handsome? It can be done at W. L. 
Clark's Photographic Rooms, 352 Washington Street. (Use the 
elevator.) 

If the Darwinian doctrine of "the survival of the fittest" applies 
to carpet designs, the firm of Goldthwait & Co. will be long in 
the field of competition. Their carpets are among the fittest. 

" If you want to spoil all that God gives you ; if you want to 
be miserable yourself and a maker of misery to others, the way is 
easy enough. Only be selfish, and it is done at once. — Charles 
Kingsley. 

The pictures which adorned the Chapel walls during commence- 
ment week testify to the diligence with which the art pupils have 
pursued their study the past year, as well as to the skill which 
they have attained. In Miss Philips and Miss Kiser, the studio 
will lose two of its most promising students. The crayon sketches 
of the former, in particular, elicited much well-deserved praise 
from the week's visitors. 

The "lecturers of the year," who favored us with their com- 
pany on Thursday evening, failed to comply with the terms of 
their invitation, in failing to bring their " families." 

The womanly patience with which the students bore their deep 
disappointment, caused by the absence of the Examining Com- 
mittee from the examinations, is worthy of mention. 

Dr. D. H. Wheeler's lecture, on Wednesday evening, was 
sharp, wide-awake and instructive, as our previous acquaintance 
with his paper had led us to expect. His remarks were received 
with hearty assent, although his assertion concerning the lack of 
poetry in the French language caused a slight stir among the 
students of "la langue francaise." 

It remains a disputed point whether sight, hearing or taste re- 
ceived the most gratification at the reception on Thursday. Flowers, 
witching music and tempting viands combined, certainly suc- 
ceeded in affording enjoyment for every guest. 

Who ever saw more vigorous-looking graduates than they were 
who stepped off Lasell's stage last Thursday ? A good proof of 
our good keeping. And who ever had a pleasanter home than we 
girls ? We see some buildings that are more imposing, but none 
that are more nicely furnished, or comfortable, or withal so home- 
like 

(ESTABLISHED 1847.) 

AARON R. GAY & CO., 

130 STATE STREET, BOSTON, 

Statioun and Blank Esok Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAY. 



THOMAS D. COOK, 

AGENT FOR THE 

NEW ENGLAND ICE CREAM CO. 

AND 

No. 8 PROVINCE COURT, BOSTON. 
Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at very Reasonable Rates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care and promptness. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



THE 



NEW-YORK 

I(ife Ii| $111^11 de Conqcpkqy, 

346 & 348 Broad-way, New York. 



MORRIS FRANKLIN, 
President. 



WILLIAM H. BEERS, 
Vice-President & Actuary. 
Established 1845. Purely Mutual- 



ASSETS, $35,000,000.00 



BOSTON BRANCH OFFICE: 

Congress Building, 4 Post-Office Square, 
STOCKING & AUSTIN, Managers. 

JAMES W. KIDNEY, 

Mechanics' Exchange, 33 & 35 Hawley St. 



Order Box 20*. 



BOSTON. 



Edge-Stones Set; Streets, Places, Private 

Avenues, and all kinds of Plain and 

Fancy Paving done promptly. 

EVERY VARIETY OF PAVING MATERIALS FURNISHED, IF DESIRED, 

Attention given to the building of Railroad Tracks, 

flSTMr. Kidney can be found at the Exchange, between 
the hours of 12 and 1. 

$100 SAVED is $ioo EARNED 

The above amount can be saved by every 
family in one YEAH, by purchasing their gro- 
ceries at the mammoth store of 

C I>. COBB & BROTHERS, 

722, 726 and 728 Washington St. 

For the past thirty years our motto has been 
lakge sales and small prOfits, and our con- 
stantly increasing trade is sufficient guarantee, 
that our efforts in that line have proved a success. 

Examine our Prices. What $1.00 Will Buy ! 

3 rouNi>s Prime Oolong Tea $1 00 

11 " French Breakfast Coffee, ... l 00 

10 " Corn Starch I 00 

10 " Silver Gloss Starch 1 00 

12 " Flake Tapioca l 00 

10 " Pearl Tapioca, 1 oo 

10 " Pearl Sago, 1 00 

20 " canada oat meal 1 00 

25 " fresh hominy 1 00 

25 " Samp 1 00 

17 '« Prime Carolina Rice 1 oo 

40 " Yellow Bolted Meal 1 00 

14 " Choice Dried Apples 1 00 

15 " Choice Prunes, 1 00 

13 Quarts Best Medium Beans l 00 

10 ' " Best- pea Beans, 1 00 

10 " Split Peas 1 00 

25 Pounds Prime popping Corn 1 00 

12 Tumiileks Pure Fruit Jellies 100 

5 2V« lb. Bars Aknold's Standard Extra 

Soap 1 00 

5 2V2 lb. Bars Curtis Davis' Extra Soap, . 1 00 

10 Bars American Peerless Soap 1 00 

14 Bars BABBITT'S Best Soap 1 00 

io bars Babbitt's N. y. city soap l oo 

10 Cakes Imported Castile Soap 1 00 

Don't fail to give us a call before purchasing. 
All goods packed in strong cases and delivered 

FREE 100 MILES. 

Call and get, or send for, catalogue of goods 
with prices, which will give full particulars. 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

PRINCIPAL WAREHOUSE, 

Nos. 722, 726 & 728 Washington St., Boston. 

BRANCH STORES: 140 Hanover, cor. Union St., Boston. 

1311 and L818 Washington Street, Boston. 2235 

Washington St., Boston. Cor. Main & 

Milk sis , westboro'. 145 & 147 

Main St., Fitchburg. 



THE BEST PLACE 



TO buy 



FURNITURE 



IS AT 



PANE'S MANUFACTORY, 

48 O^ZlSTAIj STREET, 

BOSTON. 



COLLIER & PERKINS, 

Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

ENGRAVINGS, CHROMOS, 

Frames, Stereoscopes and Views, 
VELVET FRAMES & PASSEPARTOUTS, 

n^roxjLiDinsra-s, 

And every Article desired by the Picture Dealer and 
Frame Maker. 

361 WASHINGTON STREET, 

3 Doors North of Bromfield St. BOSTON. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PH0VISI01T STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



MASS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

4®~ Goods delivered free of charge. 



J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

9/ AND 99 BEACH, AND 162 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, 

AND 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, 

DEALERS IN 

flue Tern* Cof f e©§, 

AND 

GROCERIES, 



AT 



Lowest IVE£\i-lsL©t Prices. 
4®" Send for Catalogue of Prices. «£& 



NEW DRUG ST ORE ! 

The subscribers would inform the residents of Au- 
burndale and vicinity that they have opened a 

DRUG STORE, 

In the new building adjoining their Grocery store, on 
Auburn Street, facing Grove, and will keep on hand 
a Fresh Stock of 

PURE DRUGS, 
CHEMICALS, 

PATENT MEDICINES, 

TOILET ARTICLES, &c. 

This Department is under the management o^ 
MR. BRUSH, an apothecary of large experience. 
Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed at all 
hours, from purest and best drugs. 

J". VICKERS Sc CO., 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

ABRAM FRENCH & CO. 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods 
and Plated Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET, 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. Wells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
Wm. A. French. 
S. Waldo French. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Aitliti' Material 



NOS. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



T ZE3L" IE 



EAGER MANUFACTURING CiPAE 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. 
R. Eager, of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Solo Manufacturers of 

The '• Ironclad " Pants ani Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST,, 



8 



LASELL LEAVES, 



CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer St. BOSTON. 

PUIIVT11VW OFKirj... &.C., FOB SAI,K. 

Printing office. Novelty Octavo Press, 25 fonts stand- 
ard new styles of type, etc. Trice $75 cash, worth double. 

tienuine Confederate SIOOO Bonds and Con- 
federate Bills, and old Coins cheap. A note for $100, 
25 cents. 

Scroll and visiting cards, any Ptyle, 25 cents per pack. 

ER.NLST K. PACKARD, So. Boston, Mass. 

WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington street, Boston. Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 
and I'iano Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 
Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

"W". H. FRENCH & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



DR. A. W. WHITNEY, 

WEST NEWTON. 

"CAREIAGES." 

We have a large stock of seasonable and 

FAMILY CARRIAGES 

AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

112 SUDBURY ST., BOSTON. 

F. E. CROCKETT, M. D., 

HOMCEOPATHIST, 
Kesidence, Washington treet, opp. Elm Street 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Office hours, before 8i A.M., 1-3 and 7-8 P.M. 

ZSTIO^IOTjS cfer ZHZ^-XjILj, 
Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOT0N. 
IZEWHSTGr BROTHEES 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH, PTJRJt; COUNTRY 



MIL 



Citizens of Auburndale and vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. O. Address, Auburndale. 

WATERS & DfMAN, 

"WEST IINTIB'WI'OlSr -A-JNTID -A.TTJBtXRlSri3.A.:iliJE!, 
DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cevent, Plaster, Hair aid Drum Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

C. SARG-EBTT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 

night. 



GEO. W. DEAN & CO., 

taroigoi f rait $ | IProSuee, 

13 & 15 Merchants Row, 



BOSTON. 



JOHN HANCOCK 
JVTutukl I^ife Ir\^ui x cLT\de Cfo. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Has Accumulated Assets Exceeding $2,650,000. 



GEORGE THORNTON, President. 

GEO. B. WOODWARD Secretary 

CHARLES G. WOOD Treasurer 

SAMUEL ATHERTON, Vice-President 

J. C. WHITE Medical Examiner 

SAMUEL WELLS, Counsel 

FRANK M. HAYDEN, .... Supervisor of Agents 

BOSTON LrBAB CO. 

(Incorporated in 1839.) 

J. H. CHAD WICK <fc CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVER STREET, BOSTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

®®*!! ftee DMte Seal, 

DRY AND CROUND IN OIL. 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure W hite Lead, both dry and ground in oil, we war- 
rant to be STRICTLY PURE, and guarantee that for Fine- 
ness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any Lead 
in the market, either foreign or American. 

W In order to protect ourselves we have adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in the centre. This is on every package of 
our PUltE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO. 

"MED AT TEE BAD," 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CEJJTEWJSIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURING PERMANENCE OF TONE. 
Waterooms, 484 Washington Strast, BOSTON, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue Free. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AT WHOLESALE A]V1> KETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & ROWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Paiqtery $u$>plie£, Sfti^ts" J\laterial£, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



IPS 

H 



USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FRANK E. PORTER, M. D. 

Vhpieicd! ftMi 9m§mm. 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases, and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street. Auburndale. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

FOEEIGN AND DOMESTIC FETJITS, 

Nats, Raisins, Fi?s, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c 
1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. FRANK E. RICHARDSON. 

FRAItfK WOOD, 

STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bromfield Street, BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School work. 

JOEL GCLDTHWAIT & CO. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CAEPETING8, 

Nos. 167 and 169 Washington Street, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



BOSTON. 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



OLIVE* DITSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Sheet Music and Music Books, 

Pianos, Organs and Melodeons, 

451 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON.. 

NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 
16,000 Pupils since 1867. 50 eminent Professors. Best 
Methods. 115 hours for $15.00. 

THE NORMAL INSTITUTE, 
A sea-side summer school, course elective. 70 Lecturers 
and Professors. Literary and Musical departments. 

AddrebS.B. Toukjee, Music Hall, Boston, 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 
Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

^flS'tcW. 

j". ZKmxroAA7":r_iE!s cfc soms, 

Wnok'salc and Retail Dealers in Freth, Smoked and Pickled 

PISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 & 123 Faneuil Hall Market, ... - BOSTON, 

J. Knowles. R. H. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 

SWAN <3c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN, BOSTON. 
S. B. NEWTON. 

"w7 r>_ i.i.A/riHiiEtoiP, 

ATJBUUWDAi.E, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding 1 Stable. 

Also, Auburndale & Boston Express. 





— 1. . '■ — 
-, 



ID XT .251 IF'IEIVLIIxr.A. FAGTI. 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNMLE, MASS., OCTOBER, 1877. 



Number 1 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS A CO. 

A Stock of Carpets in which. Practical Purchasers 
■will iind much, to Admire — Elegance, Service- 
ability and Cheapness Joined. 

This well-known firm has long been a special favorite with 
young housekeepers, who for the first time venture into the 
mysteries of furnishing, and ponder deeply in their girlish minds 
th ! various ways of creating a cosy little menaye from a modest 
little purse. The stock here is essentially a practical one -not 
" too high and good for human nature's daily food," and yet 
tasteful, well-selected and complete in all the styles, old and 
new, English and French, Oriental and Occidental, artistic and 
mechanieal, original and imitative, that are now competing for 
the favor of the'buyer. 

The assortment of rngs at this house is notably complete and 
extensive, and the buyer may here learn from the conrteons 
attendant the names of the different kinds of Oriental fabrics now 
in the market, and study their styles for himself. The Kelim 
rngs from Arabia and Egypt (sometimes ornamented with feath- 
ers and coins) vary very much in texture, some being very coarse ; 
others much firmer and finer ; but all of them have rude, barbaric 
designs in broad masses of dull reds, yellows, greens and blues, 
and are without that refined sentiment and complicated though t 
which distinguishes other Oriental fabrics. The Coula rug from 
Turkey and Smyrna is that with which we have been longest 
familiar, and is now the cheapest rug imported. It has a long, 
soft nap, and come3 in all sizes, and generally in brilliant reds 
and blues. Twenty or twenty-five years ago, these were consid- 
ered very elegant for aristocratic parlors and libraries, but they 
are now too crude and "loud" for the more subdued tones of the 
modern drawing-room, and are relegated to the bed-rooms 
and sitting rooms, where bright colors and cheerful chintzes 
still hold their own. The Bombay rug is necessarily thick 
and stout. It comes in dull crimson grounds, varied with 
small and simple black, maroon, tin and cream-white figures- 
The Niegata rugs, from Japan, are a new importation. They re- 
semble Turkish towelling in fabric, and are not all of wool. Con- 
sequently they are cheap. They are mostly white grounds, with 
indigo-blue, or pale green, or pale brown figures, and they show 
all that aitistic feeling and grace of design and eye for "effect," 
which make the Japanese the "French" of Asia and something- 
more. 

The Berlin rugs and carpets, supposed to be, and generally 
called "Turkey" carpets, arc an Oriental imitation that is manu- 
factured at Schmeiderberg, in Breslau. The ground is uniformly 
of a splendid red, the different carpets varying only in the design 
put upon them in black, green, etc. , etc. The Goerdez rugs are 
those with the brilliant yellow or red centres, or with black cen- 
tres and brilliant flowers. They are always handsome and effect- 
ive. The very newest thing in rugs is from Kurdistan. It is 
made of camel's hair, and woven so as to be used on either side 
indifferently, the "wrong" side sometimes being handsomer than 
the right. The costliest and choicest rugs are the Daghistan 
rugs, from Asiatic Turkey. They are made with a close, thick, 
short pile, and will wear forever. No two are alike, and they are 
covered with rich and strange devices, in the most brilliant, 
mingled with the most subdued colors, so that the whole tells us 
a complicated and fascinating story, if we could only understand 
it. One of these rugs had a bold centre of blue black, surrounded 
by an elaborate border; another was in exquisite little stripes, 
covered with seemingly cabalistic characters; and a third was a 
maze of central intricacy, surrounded by many narrow borders, 
two or three of them being of the Mussulman's sacred green. 
Nothing ever repeats itself in these rugs. No two ends, no two 
sides, scarcely any two figures are alike. The workman seems to 
proceed ar, his. own sweet will, and the result in each case is an 
individual work of art, upon which one is never weary of gazing. 
The beautiful Terrac.han rugs resemble the Daghistan, but are not 
so expensive. In looking at these Oriental products, so utterly 
different, all of them, from any Western textile fabrics, one won- 
ders whether the rage for them among ourselves will stimulate 
the workmen who design and weave them, into new and per- 
haps dangerous flights of imitative fancy, or whether they will 
calmly continue to stick to the forms and oolors and proportions 
of their ancestors. One ol the Uoerdez rugs rather frightened 
us, it was so evidently suggested by some common-place English 
"realistic" carpet in roses and butterflies, and if the detestable 
"aniline" dyes should get in anions them, they would ruin the 
carpets, as they havo many of the shawls of the hitherto artistic 
East. 



The following is a production written in Lexington, Kentucky, which we hap- 
pened to see, and which we insert in our paper. What kind of girls do you have 
in Kentucky, friend ? Come east, and find out your mistake. — 

Tell me not in mournful numbers, 

That young ladies will not flirt; 
For within my heart there slumbers 

Painful knowledge of their hurt. 

'Tis the plain truth, told in earnest, 

With the "jilted" I condole; 
Sad experience ever burnest 

In the depths of my poor soul. 

In enjoyment, and not sorrow, 

With our poor hearts trifle they, 
For they have on each to-morrow, 

Flirted one more than to-day. 

Arts are great ; and every meeting — 

Though our hearts be stout and brave- 
Always ends in our retreating, 

With our hopes dashed in the grave. 
When on Cupid's field of battle, 

In the love-affairs of life, 
"Be not like dumb, driven cattle ! 

Be a hero in the strife!" 
Trust no lady, howe'er pleasant, 

Do not by her smiles be led ; 
When she gets your nicest present, 

Down she'll drop you on your head. 

Starting, then, just where we find us, 

We can make our misery sweet, 
By revenge on those who mind us, 

Drinking in what we repeat. 

Be revenged! so that another, 

Sailing o'er love's rugged main, 
A forlorn and jilted brother 

Seeing, may take heart again. 

Let us, then, be up and doing; 

Leading girls on to their fate ; 
Still proposing, still pursuing, 

Flirting at a fearful rate. 



Chapter III. 

And it came to pass in the fourth year of his reign, that the good prince Charles 
caused many messages to be sent throughout all the country round about ; calling 
upon all fathers and mothers to give unto him the care of their daughters, promis- 
ing that they should become mueh improved in mind and body. Now, behold ! 
there was a great lack of money in all the land, and many of the people were una- 
ble to do according to his wish, but others, having heard the words of the prince, 
that they were good, said unto their daughters : "Behold ! the great and wise 
prince Charles desires your presence at his court, in the fair and quiet land of 
Saint's Rest, and we commit you to his care, that you may get wisdom and under- 
standing." So, in the twentieth day of the ninth month, a large number of dam- 
sels, from far and near, presented themselves at the court, and did say : "0. 



LA SB L L LEA V E S. 



prince ! we have come hither with desire to receive the in- 
structions of thy wise people." 

Then Charles met them with gentle words, and did treat them 
with all kindness ; but for some time, many of the damsels were 
in great tribulation, and did sorely mourn in their desire to see 
again the countries they had left. 

Now among the many wise maidens whom the prince had called 
unto him, there was one Caroline, who had sojourned at the court 
many days, and who did have the entire charge of the young dam- 
sels. She did also teach the damsels concerning the writings of 
ancient men, and was much beloved by them because of her witty 
sayings. There was also one Angeline, whose knowledge was 
exceeding great, and who discoursed most pleasingly upon all 
known sciences. Then there was one Anna, whom the prince had 
recently called to the court for the purpose of instructing the dam- 
sels in the art of figures, and in developing their strength. 
Another, from a far-off country, whose name, being interpreted, is 
Mary, did teach the damsels many foreign tongues, and did pleas- 
antly converse with them during the time of feasting. Then 
there was one Ursula, who did not abide at the temple, but who 
came, day by day, from the city near by, and did instruct the 
damsels in the arts of writing and reasoning. Now this maiden 
was of a strong mind, and under her instruction the damsels 
waxed wise in arguments, until the other damsels would often 
cease from their labors to listen unto their wisdom. There was 
also at the court, one Jane, who did represent all manner of 
objects by means of her skilful pictures. 

And lo ! there was one Isaiah, whose learning was so great 
that the damsels often said: "Alas! we cannot comprehend the 
words of this man, and what will be our fate, when the evil days 
shall come in which we shall be examined ? " But Isaiah* 
although well stricken in years, did continue to instruct them in 
the tongues which the Greeks and Romans spake. 

There was yet another, named Joseph, who had been at the 
court for many years, and he did teach a part of the damsels to 
play upon every kind of musical instrument ; also, they who 
dwelt in the temple were daily soothed by sweet sounds proceed- 
ing from the mouths of the maidens who were taught to raise 
their voices in singing, by one Harry, a man who came from the 
great city hard by, and who, on the fifth day of every week, did 
charm them with many learned discourses on the subject. Last 
of all came Samuel, whose voice was like the sound of many 
waters, and who did come to the court as of old, and the damsels 
were much pleased with his instructions. Besides all these whom 
we have mentioned, there were many others, who came at the 
command of Charles, to give the members of his court the benefit 
of their wisdom. Now the damsels abode many days at the 
court, and although they sometimes committed offences in the 
sight of the prince, all things went well with them. 



While one of the best-read lawyers in Worcester County was 
reading a brief to the Supreme Court at Worcester, the other day, 
he used the phrase "patrons of the Boston and Albany Railroad." 
"What do you mean by the word 'patrons' ? " inquired Chief Jus- 
tice Gray. The lawyer explained that he meant people who pat. 
ronized the road — its customers. The judge then suggested that 
he should use the word that conveyed that idea, and explained 
that "patron" has no such signification, and that the State is, 
strictly speaking, the only patron of the road. After this lesson 
in etymology the reading of the brief proceeded. — Adv. 



As with dainty fingers Memory lifts the veil from the past, we 
can almost imagine that we are living over again its many joys 
and sorrows. She seems to paint all the different events of our 
lives ; and as we see each picture reproduced, with such vivid 
accuracy, we watch the hand, in its rapid progress, with varied 
emotions. 

The merry scenes of childhood are glowingly depicted, and we 
fondly linger here, recalling the thoughtless happiness which van- 
ished all too soon. We are swiftly led to another picture, which 
displays a young girl just budding into womanhood, looking forward 
with hopefulness and eagerness to the future, which seems to her to 
contain only brightness and beauty ; building air castles which 
seem to be based upon too firm a foundation ever to fall. Time is 
playing into her life only the sweetest music, and she dreams not 
that the future can contain any discords, or that the strings of her 
heart will ever get out of tune. 

Passing but too quickly from this bright scene, Memory paints 
another picture, and we bow in speechless sorrow as we see that 
it contains only a few graves. We remember the last sad parting 
with those who were dear to us, and how dark and drear the world 
seemed after the spirit had gone to its eternal home. Forever 
gone ! Can it be that only a tress of hair, a memory, and the 
lonely grave in the churchyard are all that is left of the once loved 
form! That was many years ago, and the grass has grown and 
withered many times o'er the quiet spot ; and, although the first 
keen sorrow has passed away like the dusky shades of night, 
and the cypress wreath has been laid aside, we can never quite 
forget. 

Sorrowfully we turn away from this picture, to the next that 
hangs upon Life's wall. We have errors freely pointed out to us, 
for Memory seems to delight to linger upon them, and we see when 
we might have done better, what noble deeds might have been ac- 
complished, if we had only been patient and persevering. We see 
resolutions made and broken ; new pages turned over, only to be 
stained and soiled like the ones before. Memory mercilessly pur- 
sues us to the end, and then leaves us only our thoughts. 

We firmly resolve to make atonement for the past, in the future, 
but start less hopefully when we remember our many failures. 
Let us trust that our future actions will be founded upon diviner 
chords of music, that will swell into a grand harmony in other 
years; that, when the great painting of our lives is presented to 
the Father, He, in His loving kindness, may consider it worthy to 
be placed among those hanging upon the walls of Paradise. 



A Bad Memory. — An amusing incident occurrred in a Connect- 
icut district school, a few days since. A little boy, six years old, 
was seen to whisper, but denied doing so when reproved by the 
teacher; he was told to remain after school, when the teacher, 
trying to impress upon his youthful mind the sinfulness of not 
speaking the truth, asked him if they did not tell him in the Sun- 
day School where bad boys went, who told falsehoods. Choking 
with sobs, he said : "Yes, ma'am ; it is a place where there is a fire, 
but I don't just remember the name of the town." — Adv. 

Que le temps paralt long quand on regarde devant soi, et que la 
vie parait courte quand on regarde derriere soi pour interroger le 
souvenir! — il semble a P enfant, qu'il n'epuisera jamais la longue 
serie des jours ; et le vieillard s'etonne de trouver son berceau 
tout pies de sa tombe. 



LA SELL LEA V E S 



3 



fha I» ni ih% MIj.j 

A rose and a lily together bloomed, 
In the midst of a garden fair; 

The one was bright with blushing hue; 
The other with beauty rare. 

The lily, disliking her paleness, 
Thought the rose a lovely sight; 

The rose thought red was common, 
And wished her cheeks were white. 

And so they pined and fretted, 
And withered a„way and died ; 

The wind moaned softly o'er them, 
And buried them side by side. 

The night bent down in sorrow, 

O'er the cold forms of the two, 
And with dusky arms embraced them, 

Weeping sweet tears of dew. 

In the sad fate of these flowers, 

A lesson we may find : 
In our daily life to cherish 

Contentment of the mind. 



Baby, stretching out his tiny hands, jumps and crows, while 
his eyes sparkle and his face dimples with laughter, as he* tries to 
grasp the sunbeam which streams in at the window and dances on 

the floor. 

Grown older, he stops his play and reaches for the bright spots 
on the carpet, or runs and tries to catch the gold-dust flickering in 
the air. He finds it a vain pursuit, but continues it, not under- 
standing why, when he opens his hand so carefully, the pretty 
treasure he expected to find is gone — where? Still it is before 
him, moving in gentle waves or with quick flashes, as if bidding 
him to try again ; playing at hide and seek, now lost in the shade, 
peeping through the branches of trees, falling on ferns which, wet 
with dew, glisten beneath its light as if covered with diamonds, 
and now glancing in mimic cascades which the little brook makes 
as it winds through meadow and forest, rushing over the pebbles 
and grasses which obstruct its way ."never stopping, until grown 
into a mighty river, it reaches the ocean. The sunshine has gone 
with it all the way, and now seems brighter than ever as it plays 
with the great white-crested waves that are chasing each other in 
their glorious freedom. What should we do without the sunshine ? 
If it is denied us for a single day the children get cross, fretful, 
and are so often in tears that it seems as if the rain without must 
always be accompanied by rain indoors, and the grown up folks 
do not set them a very good example, for they get impatient too 

sometimes. 

Why, it seems almost impossible to wake up feeling bright and 
happy if there is no pleasant sunshine to greet us with a cheery 
" good morning." How natural it is for the brow to contract and 
the face to look gloomy when we find the precious light shut out 
by clouds, and for us to think that we certainly cannot be pleasant 
if the weather is not. But we forget that, if we try, we can make 
our own sunshine, and with it can light up every place, until our 
companions will be deceived into believing the darkest day 
beautiful, and assured of the fact that every cloud has its silver 
lining. Was there ever a home where there was not one member 
of the family who went by the name of Sunshine ? No. There 
might have been places where people lived, but there certainly 
was never a home where there was not one child who, with its 



sunny smile, affectionate caress, and funny ways did not fill all 
hearts, as well as every corner of the house, with sunshine. 

How much happier the world would be if we could but remem- 
ber to fill our lives and the lives of others with kind actions 
gentle words and cheerful smiles, which are just as necessary for 
the development of a human heart and character as is the light of 
the sun for the unfolding of the lily or the delicate coloring of the 
rose. How it loves the old-fashioned places ! How it streams 
over the yeiiuw kitchen floor of the oid farm house, and falls on 
the rows of bright tins against the wall, just as if it were certain 
of a welcome, and knew that no one would think of shutting it 
out. Notice the difference between that house and the stately 
stone mansion where the shutters are always closed so the sunlight 
can never come in. In which one of tfyem do we find the loving 
family, kind words, and constant though simple marks of affection ? 

See the sunshine as it looks out from the clouds, dispelling the 
gloom and lighting up every nook and corner, every flower and 
leaf, with its kindly rays. Then at sunset see the dark masses 
which have collected on the horizon, but which, as the sun goes 
down, are surrounded with such radiance, and are edged with 
such glorious gold, crimson and violet hues, that everything is 
beautiful, and the clouds themselves seem to give out light. So 
the trials and sufferings of life appear when we see them sur- 
rounded by a spirit of faith and Christian resignation, and the 
sufferer will realize his victories when he shall stand " in the new 
light of a perfect day and walk in the sunshine of God's love." 



A f iragedy. 

The "Sem." girls all agree that of late they have been espe- 
cially favored with regard to concerts, both as to quality and quan- 
tity. Nature's minstrels have been busy devising new themes 
for their pleasure and profit. 

Let me relate the touching experience of one young lady, as an 
example. It had been a day of hard study ; and, wearied both in 
mind and body, she was wandering* off to the land of Nod, when 
her rest was disturbed by a gentle humming, in rather unpleasant 
proximity. It was not much ; only a performer tuning up for the 
night. With an ejaculation — about home, I presume, — she 
changed her position. Scarcely was she again lost in oblivion, 
before a familiar air floated to her ear. Looking toward the water 
pitcher, whence the sound seemed to proceed, she descried a pic- 
ture worthy of an artist's brush. Upon a rose leaf, which had 
been wafted thither from a bouquet in the room, sat the mosquito, 
singing "A Life on the Ocean Wave." 

His companion, having retired from active life, was contentedly 
rockino- in the arm chair, which kept up so dismal a squeak that 
all hope of further sleep was banished from the mind of our hero- 
ine. It is very strange, but since then she has had a peculiar 
aversion to midnight serenades. Do you wonder at it, reader ? 



True Politeness. — Miss Randolph, the great-grand-daughter 
of Thomas Jefferson, has many anecdotes concerning her famous 
ancestry, and among them is the tale of a great aunt, who once re- 
marked naively of her husband, "Sure, he's the politest man that 
ever' lived ; he never even comes into a room without looking 
through the key-hole first, to know if he'll be welcomed!" — 
Woman's Journal. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



— BY THE- 



Lasell Publishing Association, 

— OF— 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

EDITOR. 
MARGARET HAMILTON, ' 7 S. 



ALICE M. LINSCOTT, '78. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 



PUBLISHER. 
ANNA H. WHITE, '78. 



CARRIE KENDIG, '79. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS 






IRENE G. SAN FORD, '79. S. 


ALIC 

Office : 


2 DUNSMORE, '78- 


Editor's Office : No. 17 Blaisdell Hall. Publisher' s 


No. 8 Happy Hall. 




Terms, In Advance: 






One Copy, one year, (including postage) 

Single Numbers, ------- 


_ 


.75 Cts. 
- .10 Cts 


Advertising Rates. 






1 2 column, 3 months, $2.00. 6 months, $3.50. 




9 months, $5.00. 


1- " " 4.00. " 7.00. 




" 10.00. 


1-4 " " 5.00. " 8.00. 




" 12.00. 


1-2 " " 9.00. " 15.00. 




" 22.00. 


3-4 " " 12.00. " 22.00. 
1 " " 15.00. " 28.00. 




" 30.00. 
" 40.00. 


Frank Wood, Printer, 352 Washington Street, Boston. 



We are beginning another school year, and for some of us, it is 
the last. As we look back upon our school life, and remember 
how pleasantly and happily it has been spent, we feel almost sad 
to think that we shall never be "school girls" again. 

Let us try to make this year as profitable as possible, and then, 
when we go out of our school-room walls, to womanhood's wider 
arena, we may take with us a pleasant memory of the past, as 
well as a bright outlook into the future. 

The "melancholy days" are almost here, and the leaves, now 
just turning to scarlet and gold by the fairy fingers of the frost, 
will soon be lying dead and brown upon the earth ; bat we hope, 
when everything in Nature looks dark and sad, to have stored up 
enough sunshine, within doors, to keep us happy all the long win- 
ter ; and we also hope that our "■Leaves" will flourish and unfold, 
in contrast with the poor withered things which rustle under our 
feet. 



Average height of "our girls," 5 feet 2-^g- inches. Tallest, Miss 
Linscott, 5 feet 6| inches. Shortest, Miss Watts, 4 feet 9| inches. 
Average weight, 114 pounds 10 ounces. The " Granite State " 
sends us the heaviest, 155 ; but her modesty forbids us to mention the 
name. New York sends us little Miss Stedman, our lightest, 
who weighs 91 ; but she isn't the "lightest" in the Latin class. 



Wonderful how much patience in waiting for the proprietor 
the girls have, when they go to get advertisements, over and 
above their measure of that great grace when they go to the same 
place to buy. 



"Xtowa II© Bubo?. 1 " 

The young women of Lasell have been highly favored this Fall 
in the way of pleasant excursions. Several weeks ago a large 
number of students, with their Principal, enjoyed an excursion to 
Charlestown Navy Yard and Bunker Hill Monument. Last 
Wednesday we received an invitation to take a trip down the 
Harbor to visit the forts, Minot's Light, and other places of in- 
terest. The day before the excursion was dark and cloudy, and 
faces could be seen at almost every window, watching for indica- 
tions of fair weather for the morrow. But as evening came on, the 
clouds rolled away, and Wednesday morning dawned bright and 
clear. Half-past eight found us all, teachers, scholars, trustees 
and their families, at the depot, waiting for the train. 

On reaching the wharf we were crowded into a little "tug." 
which was to convey us to the steamer lying a short distance from 
the shore. Reaching this we were lifted by the united efforts of 
trustees and officers, from the tug to the deck of the beautiful 
craft. After sailing to the Navy Yard, we turned and took a 
direct course out to sea, passing between Fort Winthrop and Fort 
Independence. 

We landed at Fort Warren, where we took lunch, for which our 
voyage had given us good appetites. After a merry repast we 
entered the Fort, and took a survey of the interior. Ascending 
the walls we were greeted by a magnificent view of the Harbor 
and the surrounding islands. 

Leaving the Fort, we went to Minot's Ledge. As we proceeded 
the waves increased, and soon one after another of our company 
was missed from the deck, while every now and then was heard 
the question, "Are you sick?" and the reply, "No-o-o," was soon 
followed by a rapid descent to the cabin, or a shifting to the side 
of the vessel. 

As night drew on, we approached the shore, and everybody re- 
coverd health and spirits. We reached home in safety, weary but 
content, having enjoyed the day exceedingly, and feeling very 
much indebted to the kind friend who had made the day such a 
pleasant one for us. 



"Soelal Oillifi, 



vv 



The second reception of the term was given on Saturday even- 
ing, Oct. 13th. All were cordially and politely received by 
Misses Carpenter, Magoun, Potter, Lovering and Penneli. At 
8.30 o'clock, the parlors were well filled with teachers and schol. 
ars, besides many friends of the school ; among the latter we were 
pleased to see Miss Perkins, of "77, among us again. 

Various games were entered into, all of which passed off pleas- 
antly, with one exception, in which the blame is laid to Prof. B., 
as he preferred to laugh at sixty young ladies rather than have 
the same number laugh at him. We warn him, "one good turn 
deserves another." Miss Clark favored us with a piano solo, 
which was appreciated by all. 

One of the most enjoyable features of the evening was a 
charade, gotten up under the direction of Miss Mehlbach. The 
exercise of the games made the ice cream noticeably attractive. 

"Waiting," sung by Miss Dunsmore, was received with much 
pleasure. All extend thanks to Misses Dickson and Hull for their 
piano duet, and to Misses Curtis and Kendig for their song. 
This evening was one of the most social we have enjoyed for 
some time, and with wishes for another similar one, we bade our 
hostesses good night. 



LA SELL LEA V E S. 



Another one of our members has gone the way of all the world : 
Bernice Langworthy has become Mrs. McFadden. 

We hope to have the pleasure of listening to another course of 
entertaining and instructive lectures by Mr. Stoddard, this winter. 

Our friend "Miranda," class of '80, is making herself famous in 
her native town, by teaching the young ideas how to shoot. 

Four of our musicians are on the high road to fame, in the study 
of harmony, which is so easy. 

The old girls are very glad to see the pleasant face of Miss Gil- 
more among them again, and the more so in the new relation. 

Anyone desiring information upon the subject of toothache, 
please apply to rooms 25 and 33. 

Why are the "young women'' necessarily crowded in church ? 
Because there is but one "Pew" for them all. 

We congratulate Miss Mary Hall, last year our teacher in math- 
ematics, upon the future that awaits (?) her at the bar! Let the 
men beware. 

Well done for the class of ""77." Miss Eva Bragdon, one of its 
members, is filling the position of preceptress in a western semi- 
nary. 

The girls of the Senior class were glad to welcome the new 
member from Kentucky. All of the class seem to be in good 
spirits, and to apply themselves diligently to their work. 

The class in astronomy experienced a severe disappointment on 
the 11th inst., because the "tele, at a distance, scopio, I see, '> 
didn't come. 

The teachers have gone back to the beginning of knowledge, 
and are learning the alphabet. We hope Miss Mehlbach will 
allow no inattention or bad lessons in her new German class. 

Some of the girls ought to have a mirror held before them, so 
they can see what handsome and intelligent faces they make as 
they go about gnaiving chestnuts. 

We expected to see the familiar face of Miss L. Pratt, again 
this year, but were doomed to disappointment. We have heard, 
however, that she is studying elocution with Prof. Kelley, in Bos- 
ton, and bids fair to excel in that art. 

No additions having been made to the Junior class this year, 
its four members are trudging their weary way alone ; but we are 
glad to say, for the encouragement of said young women, that one 
at least, of them can (Ken) dig. 

On account of our delightfully warm weather this fall, gymnast- 
ics were postponed until a late day. On the evening of October 
10th, however, our long neglected gymnasium was again taken 
possession of, green curtain notwithstanding. 

Our lecture course for the school year of 1871-7.8, was opened 
by Dr. Latimer, on the evening of October 17th. His subject, 
"Republican Institutions," was treated with a master hand. We 
anticipate many rich treats during the year, if this lecture is an 
example of those which are to follow. 

It might be productive of some alarm to a casual observer, to 
see Alice No. 2, as each morning she passes through the halls, 
staggering beneath the weight of her books ; and it is a sight that 
would please an artist, to see the look of dismay on the face of 
Alice No. 1, as she seeks vainly among those classical works to 
find a place for the sole of her foot. 



Urn Iigkngns, 

We have not room in this number tonotice all the exchanges 
which have come to us, but will give them our best attention 
in our next issue. We cannot refrain, however, from a word 
about one : — 

The "Cn'mson" is the name of a publication hailing from Har- 
vard. We never form our opinion of a paper from a few minor 
items, but we think the character of the publishing committee and 
patrons of this paper, may be judged by the plentiful supply of 
lager beer and tobacco advertisements contained in its columns. By 
the way, from an extract contained in the issue of September 27th, 
we should infer that Princeton understands her "sister college" 
quite well. 



T@ All Qit Itliiii, 

We would take this opportunity to earnestly bespeak the co- 
operation of parents and well-wishers in our endeavors to make 
our "Leaves" successful ; suggesting that they can give us wel- 
come aid by subscribing for our paper, and, in an indirect way, by 
patronizing those who advertise in our columns, and mentioning, at 
the time, the paper in which the advertisement was noticed. 

Let our friends make a note of this. Reliable dealers in various 
trades have put their "ads." in our paper. You will be as well 
served and as cheaply, by them, as by any parties, and it will 
help us if you buy of them. 



fall lip. 

A mantle of many-tinted leaves is thrown over the dying 

flowers, and the air is laden with the perfume of ripened fruit. 

Gorgeous sunsets, which seem like inspired poems, usher out the 

days ; while earnest prayers are offered, that He who crowns us 

with loving kindness and tender mercies, may guide us so that 

the October of our lives may be filled, not alone with beautiful 

leaves, but with abundant fruit. 

"Flocks that whiten all the plain ; 
Yellow sheaves of ripened grain ; 
All that liberal autumn pours, 
From her rich, o'erflowing stores — 
These to Thee, our God, we owe. 
Source whence all our blessings flow; 
And for these our souls shall raise 
Grateful vows and solemn praise." 



ImilflBS. 

Waehrend urn mis herum die Natur sich zu ihrem Winterschlafe 
vorbereitet, herrscht in unserem "Lasell" ein frisches Leben. 
Mit heiteren Gesichtern koraraen die jungen Maedchen zu den 
Schulstunden, und machen, durch ihren sichtbaren Eifer Gutes zu 
empfangen, das Lernen und Lehren zu einer Lust. Nach der 
Schulzeit hoert man froehliches Lachen und Scherzen in den 
Hallen; und wer uns bei den Mahlzeiten saehe, wuerde sicher 
denken, wir waeren eine zahlreiche, glueckliche Familie, Kinder 
unseres, vom Geist Christlicher Liebe beseelten Vaters " Brag- 
don," der alles Denkbare thut uns vergnuegt zu sehen. Auch 
an unserem Deutsch-Franzoesischen Tische zeigt sich in diesem 
Yahre eine erfrischende Heiterkeit ; denn eine jede traegt mehr 
oder weniger dazu bei die Unterhaltung im. 

Franzoesirchen und Deutschen interessant zu machen, und an 
solchen Tagen, da die Kueche uns zu unserem Dessert eine Sahnen- 
torte oder einen Apfelpudding schickt, werden wir Iebhaft an die 
isthmischen Spiele erinnert : denn wetteifernd hoeren wir Fraeu- 
lein Curtis eine Fabel von Lafontaine, Fraeulein Ferguson und 



6 



L A S E L L LEA FES. 



Fraeulein C. Kendig deutsclie Gedichte hersagen, und Praeulein A. 
Kendig und Fraeulein Bailey frauzoesische oder deutsche Anec- 
doten erzaehlen. Unter Arbeit, Gebet und frohem Muthe vergeht 
ein Ta°; nach dem anderii, so dass fuer uns " Lasellaner " das Kad 
des Ixion sicli m it wunderbarer Geschwindigkeit zu dreben scheint. 

• D. 



Dr. Mary S afford Blake will spend the month of October in 
the West, and will begin her practice November 1st.— Ex. 

"Hard Times." — When a man is working for his board, and the 
employer cuts his salary down fifty per cent., then times are 
indeed what you might call hard. 

A Boston lady procured a permit for the burial of her pet dog 
in Mount Auburn Cemetery, through a physician's certificate that 
" Leo Gilman died of spinal meningitis." — Boston 'Traveller. 



Mr. Hudson would like this bit from Wordsworth : 

The primal duties shine aloft, like stars ; 
The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, 
Are scattered at the feet of man, like flowers. 

Bring your sentiments down to practical life. — A little girl r 
whose papa was recently under the influence of Moody and 
San key, wanted a second tart at supper, and was refused it. 
" Papa," she said abruptly, "why do you sing 'Feed me till I 
want no more'/ '" She got the tart. — Woman's Journal. 

Miss Kellogg and Miss Cary are delighting the Oalifornians 
by their singing. — Woman's Journal. 

For the Chemistry Class. — A prisoner in a western court tried 
to make the judge believe that the indigo colored marks around 
his eyes were due to the blue glass ray. — Ex. 



3f @«f H* Sniffle & ©@» 



COR. WASHINGTON & WINTER STS., 

BOSTON, 

Keep an immense stock of all the newest styles of 

I<adie$' <boot$, $l(oe$ kqd $li<pf)ef$, 

ALSO, FULL LINE OF 

STYLISH AND DUEABLE LOW COST GOODS. 




KIMBALL BROTHERS, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



J[ht£ ^-awfaje* and ^fctgfj^ 

EEPOSITOET, 

Nos. HO & 112 Sudbury St., 

Boston, Mass. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 



Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. 0. Address, Aubnrndale. 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including; 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AX WHOLESALE A.]VI» KETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in^ 

Pauqteiy 0upplie£, SftijftjS' JvTateri^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 




AT 



Paine's Manufactory, 

BOSTON. 



We take pleasure in announcing that we have opened a 
number of spacious rooms in connection with our manu- 
factory, to accommodate the retail trade of Boston and 
vicinity. Having bestowed untisual care and attention in 
finishing, we have now to offer a most complete stock of 

Fashionable Furniture, 

not excelled in quality or beauty of design. Our facilities 
are second to no other manufacturer in the country in ex- 
tent, light and general convenience, giving to us such 
advantages that we are enabled to sell ;for ready cash 
under any dealer in this vicinity, 

UPHOLSTERY AMD COST AW^ OEFAKTHEHT. 

Our new stock of imported French Lambrequins, Swiss 
Lace Curtains, Ornamental French Bronzes, Reception 
Chairs, Easels, Pedestals, Marquettere Tables, Plate Mir- 
rors and Parlor Cabintts far exceeds anything of the kind 
ever shown by us. 

Kich and Plain Furniture — Antique and Mod- 

Es£S?T!.|_e r «»- Styles.^ Ureat Keduction 
from Former Prices.^ 

141 Friend & 148 Canal Sts. 



[01 



■ u 



AGENT FOR THE 



3fUw Ifiitfllatul fu tymm €a. 



—AND— 



CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 
very Iteasouable Kates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 

$100 SAVED is $ioo EARNED 

The above amount can be saved by every 
family in one year, by purchasing their gro- 
ceries at the mammoth store of 

C. I>. COBB & BROTHERS, 

722, 726 and 728 Washington St. 
For the past thirty years our motto has been 
large sales and small profits, and our con- 
stantly increasing trade is sufficient guarantee 
that our efforts in that line have proved a success. 

Examine our Prices. What $1.00 Will Buy! 

3 Pounds Prime Oolong Tea $100 

11 " French Breakfast Coffee, ... 1 00 

10 " Corn Starch, 1 00 

10 " Silver Gloss Starch 1 00 

12 " Flake Tapioca 1 00 

10 " Pearl Tapioca, 1 00 

10 " Pearl Sago 1 00 

20 " Canada Oat Meal 1 00 

25 " Fresh Hominy 1 00 

25 " Samp 1 00 

17 " prime Carolina Rice, .... 1 00 

40 " Yellow Bolted Meal 1 00 

14 " Choice Dried apples 1 00 

15 " Choice Prunes 1 00 

13 Quarts Best Medium Beans 1 00 

10 " Best Pea Beans 1 00 

10 " Split Peas, 1 00 

25 pounds Prime Popping Corn 1 00 

12 Tumblers Puke Fruit Jellies 1 00 

5 2y 2 lb. Bars Arnold's Standard Extra 

Soap 1 00 

5 214,1b. Bars Cuktis Davis' Extra Soap, . . 1 00 

10 Bars American Peerless Soap, 1 00 

14 Bars babbitt's Best Soap, 1 00 

10 Bars Babbitt's N. Y. city Soap 1 00 

10 Cakes Imported Castile Soap, 1 00 

Don't fail to give us a call before purchasing. 
All goods packed in strong cases and delivered 

FREE 100 MILES. 

Call and get, or send for, catalogue of goods 
with prices, which will give full particulars. 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

PRINCIPAL ware-house, 

Nos. 722, 726 8e 728 Washington St., Boston. 

BRANCH STORES: 140 Hanover, cor. Union St., Boston. 

1311 and 1313 Washington Street, Boston. 2235 

Washington St., Boston. Cor. Main & 

Milk Sts.. Westboro'. 145 & 147 

Main St., Fitchburg. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



7 



THE 

PLAUE 

— TO — 

BUT 

CARPETS 

— AND — 

FURNITURE 



IS AT 



B. P. CUNNINGHAM & CO.'S. 

512 "Washington St., Boston. 



Paper Hangings, 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN, VARIETY 
UNSURPASSED,] 

AT 

LOWER PRICES THAN EVER. 

Parties desiring to decorate their Homes, or purchase 
for the Trade, are invited to call upon 

J. H. ROBINSON & CO.. 

IVo. 400 Washington St., Boston. 

;. H. ROBINSON. C. H. WHITMARSH. C. W. ROBINSON. 



@>(Ve can furnish the best of Paper Hang- 
ers at reduced rates. 



BOSTON/ UMJB 00* 

(Incorporated in 1829.) 

J. H. CHA D WICK & CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVER STREET, BOSTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

8o@fon.1Nro Okife £@oid 9 

DRY AND GROUND IN OIL. __ 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Liued Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure White Lead, both dry and ground in oil, we 
warrant to be STRICTLY PURt, and. guaranteed that tor 
Fineness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any 
Lead in the Market, either foreign or American. 

flSTIn order to protect ourselves we have adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in the centre. This is on every package of 
our PURE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

AUSTIN GOVE & SON, 

Dealers in 



LIME, CEMENT AND BRICKS, 
313 Border St., Central Square, East Boston* 

FOR. 

Btegamft Mmtm Wmpmw f 

COME TO 

j". is:isro"W"XjT£!s dfc sozrsrs, 

Wholesale n.nd Retail Dealers In Frush, Smoked and Pickled 

PISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCALLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Pish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 it 123 Fanouil Hill Mirkat, - - - - BOSTON. 
J. Knowlos. R. II. Knowles. J.'A. Knowles. 



TV, H. FRENCH <& CD, 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

FRANK WOOD, 

STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bioinfwld Street. BOSTON. 



Special attention given to College and School Work. 

NICHOLS dfc Tt3:^.T_jT_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington Street. Boston, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Hooks, Vocal 
and I'irtiio Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation isooks, the New 
Cantatas of " Ruth " and " Joseph." Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

ROBINSON'S CASH STORE. 
Dry and. Fancy Goods, 

MOODY STREET, WALTHAM. 

ADFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale. 

Physicians prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New P. H. Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

~H. & R ATWOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail 

OTBTBR DBALBR89 

19 Commercial & 104 South Market Streets, 

BOSTOU. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 

night. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

BftQ>eeQT@N), MASS. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINEKT AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AX THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. 13. Sanford, Jr. 

G. HENRY HAKPIN, 

Dealer in 

BEPAIEINQ PB0MPTL7 ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

"WHST KTB-WTOJSr AKTXJ AtTBtJRN'riA.I.B, 
DEALERS IN 

CofL, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Fife, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



STOBE 



% 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au 
hurndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the veiy best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

4®~ All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOk'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

JAMES VICKERS, 
Auburn St., Auburndale. 

HIGGANUM MT'G CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OE 

Agricultural Implements and MacMnei, 

No. 38 SOUTH MARKET STEEET, 

Boston, Mass. 

J. A. SMITH, - - Manager, 

[Formerly with Ames Plow Co.] 



FACTORY AND MAIN OFFICE AT HIGGANUM, CT. 

" J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH AND 162 LINCOLN STREETS, BOSTON. 

AND 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, 

DEALERS nsr 

lime Teae, Coff ee§ s 

AND 

GROCERIES, 

AT 

T_io"w©st Ivlnx-lsKet I?:rio©s, 
4ST*Seud for Catalogue of Priees.«®j 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



^ ABRAMI FEENCHMCO. 

£jj Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods, and 
Plated Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 



89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. Wells. 
Li. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
YVm. A. French. 

S. Waldo French. 



b!L I tUutU llAKUdi your name nicely printed— 
only 10 cents per dozen. Post paid. 

W. C. CANNON, 712 Washington St. 

BOSTON. 



35EDMMK 'Eiei^JSL 



Will consult their interests by obtain* 
s^?/^v ingnn estimate from the undersigned 
/ ^/ft~8'\H^^P^lk before closing their contracts. 

FOR 




IHMEMATION 



Concerning- the relative value of news- 
pa pers, their circulation, advertisinr 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



Te.EVA^^V^HJNG^N^T.BoiTjDN 



Joe! Goldthwait & Co., 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



CARPETINGS, 



Nos. 167 Si 169 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOSTON, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



(Established 1847.) 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 



130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

7 <v/f\ (V/r\ Jili- 

jtaiiontrcs and | Wtf oon jpnufarimm 

First-Class Account Books : of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN S. GAT 



FRANK E. PORTER, M. D. 

9bpi@ioi!i mi SwjpM* 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street, Aulmindale. 

CHARX.ES a. t. bloom, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON. 

JOSEPH ^A7\ G-FtlGrGr, 
Manufacturer of and Dealer in Enameled Slate 

1IITLES MB B1MIET SIIL1IS, ETC. 

Also, English Floor Tile. 

Hoofing Slate and Papers, Tarlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Kromfielcl 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO. 

DEALERS in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

Nuts, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c. 

1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. FRANK E. RICHARDSON. 

W. D. LATHROP, 

AUBCKNDALE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding Stable. 

Also, Aulmrndale and Boston Express. 
JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passepartout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
8N0, 9 Boylston Market, Boston, 

THE EAGER MANTJFAOTUEING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager'& Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 

39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

IsA. IE. POJXTID, TD. ID. S. 

Office, Auburn Street, 

Opposite Depot, 

^.TTE _ CTK.nsrX)^.X J E, MASS. 

SWTl^W «5c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Fanenil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. 
S. B. NEWTON. 



BOSTOW. 



HENRY F. MILLER, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 

Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



A. N. HARDY, 
PHOTO &R. 

Tabes pleasure in announcing to former patrons and the 
public generally that on 

November 20th, 1877, 

He will occupy a 

NEW AND COMMODIOUS STUDIO 

BUILT EXPRESSLY FOR HIS BUSINESS AT 

493 Washington Stress, between Temple Place and West St. 

Grateful to customers for past patronage, we expect, 
with largely increased facilities to bj prepared to give 
better satisfaction than ever before, and. at the lowest 
prices consistent with good work. 

PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STORE, 

AUBURNDALE, 



■**#«• 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

4®~Goods delivered free of charge. 

Grand Steinway Opening. 

Call in and near the SXEISWAVS at the 
New Warerooms or OLIVER DITSOW <fc CO., 
Wo. 449 Washington Street, Boston. 

GRAND PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including small PARLOR GRAND, only 6 ft. 
8 in. long, and CENTENNIAL CONCERT GRAND, same 
as used by Mme. Essipoff in 102 concerts. 

SQUARE PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including SQUARE GRAND, with new frame 
never before shown in New England. 

UPRIG-HT PIANOS, 

In 3 styles, including small COTTAGE PIANOS and 
CABINET GRANDS. 

Good Words for the Steinways. 

Rubinstein testifies to their " excellence and capacity 
for enduring the severest tests." 

Liszt says: "The splendid upright Piano shone to 
brilliant advantage at the festival performance at the 
Wartburg, where last Tut-sday, it served undermyfingers 
as ' Vice Orchestra,' exciting general admiration." 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO. 



ii 



MED AT THE HEAD," 



The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand Square and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGrHT pianos, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURING PERMANENCE OF TONE. 

Warerooms, 484 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue, free. 



PBMINA. ZFT^OTI. 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUMMLE, MASS., NOVEMBER, 1877. 



Number 2. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

A Stock of Carpets in -which. Practical Purchasers 
will And much to Admire— Elegance, Service- 
ability and Cheapness Joined- 

This well-known firm has long been a special favorite with 
young housekeepers, who for the first time venture into the 
mysteries of furnishing, and ponder deeply in their girlish minds 
the various ways of creating a cosy little* menaye from a modest 
little purse. The stock here is essentially a practical one — i.ot 
"too high and good for human nature's daily food," and yet 
tasteful, well-selected and complete in all the styles, old and 
new, English and French, Oriental and Occidental, artistic and 
mechanical, original and imitative, that are now competing for 
the favor of the buyer. 

The assortment of rugs at this house is notably complete and 
extensive, and the buyer may here learn from the conrteous 
attendant the names of the different kinds of Oriental fabrics now 
in the market, and study their styles for himself. The Kelim 
rugs from Arabia and Egypt (sometimes ornamented with feath- 
ers and coins) vary very much in texture, some being very coarse, 
others much firmer and finer; but all of them have rude, barbaric 
designs in broad masses of dull reds, yellows, greens and blues, 
and are without that refined sentiment and complicated thought 
which distinguishes other Oriental fabrics. The Coula rug from 
Turkey and Smyrna is that with which we have been longest 
familiar, and is now the cheapest rug imported. It has a long, 
solt nap, and comes in all sizes, and generally in brilliant reds 
and blues. Twenty or twenty-five years ago, these were consid- 
ered very elegant for aristocratic parlors and libraries, but they 
are now too crude and "loud" for the more subdued tones of the 
modern drawing-room, and are relegated to the bed-rooms 
and sitting rooms, where bright colors and cheerful chintzes 
still hold their own. The Bombay rug is necessarily thick 
and stout. It comes in dull crimson grounds, varied with 
small and simple black, maroon, tan and cream-white figures. 
The Niegata rugs, from Japan, are a new importation. They re- 
semble Turkish towelling in fabric, and are not all of wool. Con- 
sequently they are cheap. They are mostly white grounds, with 
indigo-blue, or pale green, or pale brown figures, and they show 
all that artistic feeling and grace of design and eye for "effect," 
which make the Japanese the "French" of Asia and something 
more. 

The Berlin rugs and carpets, supposed to be, and generally 
called "Turkey" carpets, are an Oriental imitation that is manu- 
factured at Schmeiderberg, in Breslau. The ground is uniformly 
of a splendid red, the different carpets varying only in the design 
put upon them in black, green, etc., etc. The Goerdez rugs are 
those with the brilliant yellow or red centres, or with black cen- 
tres and brilliant flowers. They are always handsome and effect- 
ive. The very newest thing in rugs is from Kurdistan. It is 
made of camel's hair, and woven so as to be used on either side 
indifferently, the "wrong" side sometimes being handsomer than 
the right. The costliest and choicest rugs are the Daghistan 
rugs, from Asiatic Turkey. They are made with a close, thick, 
short pile, and will wear forever. No two are alike, and they are 
covered with rich and strange devices, in the most (brilliant, 
mingled with the most subdued colors, so that the whole tells us 
a complicated and fascinating story, if we could only understand 
it. One of these rugs had a bold centre of blue black, surrounded 
by an elaborate border; another was in exqui&ile little stripes 
covered with seemingly cabalistic characters; and a third was a 
maze of central intricacy, surrounded by many narrow borders, 
two or three of them being of th« Mussulman's [sacred green. 
Nothing ever repeats itself in these rugs. No two ends, no two 
sides, scarcely any two figures are alike. The workman seems to 
proceed a.i. Ids own sweet will, and the result in each case is an 
individual work of art, upon which one is never weary of gazing. 
The beautiful Terraohan rugs resemble the Daghistan, but are not 
so expensive. In looking at these Oriental products, so utterly 
different, all of them, from any Western textile fabrics, one won- 
ders whether tho rage for them among ourselves will stimulate 
the wot k men who design and weave them, into new and per- 
haps dangerous flights of imitative funoy, or whether they will 
calmly continue to stick to the forms and colors and proportions 
of their ancestors. Cue ol the Goerdez rugs rather frightened 
us, it was so evidently suggested by some common-place English 
"realistic" carpet in roses anil butterflies, and if the detestable 
"aniline" dyes should get in among them, they would ruin the 
carpets, as they have many of the shawls of the hitherto artistic 
East. 



Smbsb hy M@@all|li 



AN EXTRACT FROM A LETTER. 



Dear 



: Have you ever seen the quiet little city of P- 



? I have visited 



there several times, and have become quite well acquainted with the pretty scenes 
in and about the beautifully-named "Forest City," but especially was I pleased 
with the views obtained at sunset, from the hills, of which there are two,— one at 
each end of the city. But charming; as the views are at these times, one can know 
little of their true splendor without having seen them under the silvery light of the 
"Lady Moon." 

One night in July, when this same orb was riding in full glory through the 
cloudless sky, I was sitting disconsolate at the window of my room in the hotel, 
meditating upon the cruelty of being obliged to remain indoors when it was so 
pleasant without, when I had a call from a friend, who asked me to take a short 
drive through the city. You know my love for riding, so you, doubtless, do not 
need to be told that I accepted the invitation. 

We first drove rapidly to the eastern hill, or "Promenade," as it is called, and, 
pausing, we looked down upon broad fields and meadows, which, dotted here and 
there with a white farm-house, stretched away for miles, until they reached the hills 
and black forests forming the background of our picture. 

On the right we could see a tiny lake, and its outlet winding in graceful curves 
through the fields, until, by a sudden turn, it was lost behind the hills. The water 
lay so quiet in the clear, pale light, that it seemed like glass; and indeed, the whole 
scene was so quiet, that we felt as if an enchantment were over us, and feared to 
speak, lest we should break the spell. Reluctantly, and with many backward 
glances, we turned away, and drove through the busy city to the western end. 

Here we saw the beautiful waters of the harbor, dancing and rippling into tiny 
waves crested with the white foam, which glimmered like pearls in the moonlight. 
There were the hundred islands, dotting the bay, and once in a while a boat would 
shoot out from among them, and the voices of its merry rowers would ring out 
clear as bells. 

But we knew the moon would soon set, so we hurried away with one last look 
at all her beauties, and on our lips the words — 



"Thou dost bless everywhere ; with silver lip 
Kissing dead things to life." 



Lady Clare. 



ItlHSr 



Respectfully dedicated to the third spelling class : — One of the old settlers at 
the Isle of Shoals, seeing the name of "Psyche" on the hull of a yacht, the other 
day, spelled it out slowly, and then exclaimed, "Well, if that aint the biggest way to 
spell rish ! "—Ex. 

The "S. D.'s " take warning. — A Senior, in a debate, dramatically ended a sen- 
tence : "In the dying moments of his last life." — Berkleyan. 

Too Trtjk. — Rowland Hill said, when he saw a boy on a rocking-horse, " Like 
some Christians; motion enough, but no progress." — Woman's Journal. 

The attractiveness of some young gentlemen. — The Sophomore Class are sur. 
veying the Campus with Professor Q. After some time spent to quiet the needle, 
Professor Q. remarks that something seems to attract the needle. " I am con- 
sidered rather attractive," puts in a Soph. " Brass doesn't attract, Mr. L.," and 
the boys whoop it up for that brazen Soph. — Ex. 



L A SELL LEA V E S. 



The Conundrum that never grows Old. (At least if she does, 
no one finds it out). — "Man," says Victor Hugo, ''was the conun- 
drum of the eighteenth century ; woman is the conundrum of the 
nineteenth century." We can't guess her, but we'll never give 
her up ; no, never ! — Ex. 

We know Prof. Bragdon will hold up both hands to vote for the 
following, even if it isn't spelled according to Webster: 

Never borro anything that yu are able to buy. Borroing will 
demoralize a man almost az fast az stealing. — Josh Billings. 

The Greatest Discovery of the Age. — One member of the As- 
tronomy class is progressing so rapidly in that science, that she is 
constantly making discoveries for which posterity will ever be 
grateful. Imagine her feelings, when, looking from her window, 
the other night, in search uf "other worlds to conquer," and sud- 
denly exclaiming that she had found a new planet, her room-mate 
calmed her exultant spirits by asserting that her "planet" was 
the street lamp. 



4 ti-if to MammetM tot* 

FROM OUR WESTERN CORRESPONDENT. 

My Dear "Leaves": — Home from the Cave! You know we 
have been meditating a visit to that place for ever so long, and of 
course you want to know all about it; so I'll begin at the begin- 
ning. We left the college at about 7 P. M., and were obliged to 
wait a long time for some of our party who came from out of town, 
and were glad enough to get into the car as soon as it was ready. 
If I could have done it, I should have turned a somersault, to show 
my joy at starting. 

Mr. St. J was our guide, and the only gentleman with us, 

so he was an object of considerable interest. We sang, ate 
oranges, and talked until nearly 12 o'clock ; then we had our 
berths made up and retired, — but didn't sleep much. 

Cave City rejoices in three stores, two houses, and a barn, — 
called a hotel. We reached said place in time for breakfast; and 
such a meal ! I never experienced anything like it before, and 
hope to be delivered from its like in the future. After it was over 
we were piled into two large stages, drawn by four horses each, 
and started for the Cave, ten miles off. 

The road was dreadful; but we reached the hotel about ten 
o'clock, and it was lovely there. Imagine an immense wooden 
house, sixty years old, all wings, only two stories high, beautiful 
grounds, every room opening out on a piazza, doors never meant 
to lock, windows ditto, and, best of all, things to eat which would 
make any school girl scream with joy. As soon as we arrived, 
we all went to the office and registered our names with 
much flourishing of trumpets, after which we walked all over 
the place until dinner-time. Dinner over, we girls arrayed our- 
selves ig our gymnastic dresses, bought some canes, and after a 
walk of about a quarter of a mile, we reached the entrance of the 
Cave, where our guide, William, gave each one of us a little lamp, 
placed himself at our head, cried " Forward," and we plunged in. 

I expected to be frightened, but was agreeably disappointed ; 
for, although we were obliged to climb wet, slippery ladders, with 
bottomless pits on one side and rocks on the other ; although 
William often called out, '■ Careful there," on the right or left, as 
the case might be, we laughed, and sang, and made it so jolly in 
every way that it was impossible to be frightened. We came out 
at 7.30 P. M., having walked only eight miles, ready to enjoy our 
supper and comfortable beds. The next morning we started tor the 



Long Route at 9.30, and came out at about the same time in the 
evening. That day was grand ; but I never witnessed such climb- 
ing and jumping as we had to do, especially in the place called 
" Rocky Mountains," where we were obliged to balance ourselves 
in most uncomfortable positions on the stones, and to leap from 
one to the other. I will not tell you of all the holes we came near 
falling into, or of the mud in which we often stuck fast. But, of 
course, you want to know about "Fat Man's Misery." It is not 
so very small ; for I could go through without turning, and you 
know I am not very small. On coming out of this place, we 
entered the " Valle} 7 of Humiliation," which is a passage about 
three and a half feet wide and four hundred and fifty yards long. 
We had to crawl through, and I came near breaking my back, 
setting my dress on fire, and nearly choked with laughing at see- 
ing the girls fall down, which we did most of the time. When we 
reached the River Styx there was a little flat boat waiting to take 
us across, and as it only held twelve, some of us were obliged to 
wait and make a second load. Think of standing by the side of 
that darkly-flowing stream, in utter darkness, except for the faint 
glimmer of our almost extinguished lamps, and you may imagine 
how we felt as we stood listening to the beating of our own 
hearts there in that awful stillness. We waited about half an 
hour before the boat came for us. As we started off, the girls 
commenced singing " Way down 'pon Swanee Ribber," and 
it was grand and awful, but sweet beyond description. The river 
was very high, and in one place we had to lie down in the boat, 
with our heads in a puddle of water, in order to get through the 
passage. We put out all the lights but one, and, after getting 
through, sang "Home, Sweet Home ; " and that, too, was grand, — 
rocks surrounding us, the rushing, sombre river bearing us on, 
the only light held by William showing his d>ark face like a shadow, 
the echo from our singing, — it was all beyond my powers of 
description. But from the sublime to the ridiculous is but one 
step, you know, and we landed in a mud bank; and after exerting 
ourselves to get out of that, we were glad when we came to a 
place where we could sit down and rest. Starting on again, we 
came to "Reveller's Hall," where we had our lunch. Then we 
went on to the top of the Rocky Mountains, where we sat and 
looked down into Dismal Hollow. When we reached the Styx 
again, our load of passengers, which was the first, decided that 
we did not care to go under that low arch again; so we stopped at 
Purgatory, and walked around the most awful places there, and 
then returned and slipped and slid through the sand to the river, 
where we embarked again. When we reached the hotel we were 
well tired out ; and when I think now of the dreadful places we 
went through, of the muddy, slippery rocks, hills which were 
almost precipices, narrow bridges spanning^all sorts of horrible 
pits, etc., etc., I am quite frightened ; but when it was all happen- 
ing I was as calm as I am now. They account for it by saying that 
the atmosphere is so bracing that one does not mind anything, and 
I can assure you it was a trip which nothing could have induced 
me to lose. One thing more, if you wish to go to a place where 
it is lovely beyond description, where the table, the servants and 
the proprietor are everything which heart can wish, seek the Cave 
Hotel. 



"How I Manage My Husband." — Girls, remember this for 
future reference : French dame to the family physician. — "Doctor, 
I want my husband to take me to Nice for the winter. Now, 
what is the matter with me ? " — Adv. 



L A S E L L LEAVES 



fill 



Oh, who can tell what flow'rets bloom 

Within that garden fair, 
Or know when lilies waste perfume, 

When weeds are springing there? 

II. 

Concealed from mortal glance, it lies 
Deep in the sheltering breast; 

Now smiling 'neath love's happy skies, 
Now by dark grief oppressed. 

in. 

Love's chosen flower — the red, red rose- 
May there in silence pine; 

But who its beauties can disclose, 
Its secret hopes divine? 

IV. 

If eyes may on us seem to dart 
The glance of friendship warm, 

While in the garden of the heart 
May lurk deception's form, 



Where then is any certain test 
Of love's, of friendship's truth? 

And must we wander on unblest 
Through cheerless, loveless youth? 

VI. 

Through manhood's prime to palsied age, 

That lays us in the dust, 
Nor know — while we life's battle wage — 

The joys of faith and trust ? 

VII. 

Ah, no! life's dark and narrow bound 

Would be but bitter woe, 
If truth had fled, nor ever found 

A resting place below. 

VIII. 

For what we are and what we feel, 

We cannot all control; 
The eye will still the truth reveal— 

The window of the soul. 

IX. 

If, in the garden of the heart 

Spring flowers of light and grace. 

The soul will steal the loveliest part 
To bloom upon the face. 



A sufficient rebuke to college "boys" who think young women 
are not ambitious enough : — A young lady, the other day, after a 
sunshower, was heard to exclaim, "What an elegant trimming 
that rainbow would make for a white lace over-dress ! " — Ex. 

We may like to remember this when we go to Europe next 
summer, and visit the celebrated churches. The following are the 
sizes of the largest churches in Europe : St. Peter's, at Rome, 
will hold 54,000 people; Milan Cathedral, 37,000; St. Paul's, at 
Rome, 32,000 ; St. Paul's, at London, 35,600 ; St. Petronio, at 
Bologna, 24, 400; Florence Cathedral, 24,300; Antwerp Cathedral, 
24,000; St. Sophia's, Constantinople, 23,000; St. John's, Lateral, 



22,900; Notre Dame, at Paris, 21,000; Pisa Cathedral, 13,000; 
St. Stephen's, at Vienna, 12,400 ; St. Dominic's, at Bologna, 12,000; 
St. Peter's, at Bologna, 11,400; Cathedral of Vienna, 11,000; 
St. Mark's, at Venice, 7,000; Spurgeon's Tabernacle, 7,000.— ifo. 

Turned Out. Fond Father — ''Well, my son, how do you like 
college? Alma Mai er has turned out some great men." Young 
Hopeful, — (Just expelled,) — "Yes, sir, she has just turned me 
out."— Ex. 

A very precise person, remarking upon Shakespeare's line : 
"The good men do is oft interred with their bones," carefully ob- 
served that this interment can generally take place without crowd- 
ing their bones. — Ex. 

A lady sent a note to the newspaper to get a recipe to cure the 
whooping cough in a pair of twins. By a mistake, a recipe for 
pickling onions was unconsciously inserted, and her name at- 
tached, and received this answer through the "Answers to Corres- 
pondents : " "Mrs. L. H. B. — If not too young, skin them pretty 
closely, immerse in scalding water, sprinkle plentifully with salt, 
and immerse them for aweek in strong brine." — Woman' 's Journal. 

At the Art Gallery. A reminiscence. — Lady : (with catalogue) 
"No. 53, 'Eve Tempted.'" Gentleman: (desirous to know the 
painter's name,) "Who by ? " Lady : (shocked at his ignorance) 
"Why, by the Devil, of course ! " — Ex. 

Junior, translating — "Et divinaopici rodebant carmina mures ; " 
"And the divine songs of the barbarians wore away the walls." 
The originality of this young man is only equalled by that of a 
student at a fitting- school, who translated "Hie patriam vendidit 
aurum," "This one hung up his father by the eaj - ."- — Ex. 

A woman butcher and a man milliner, says the Traveller, occu- 
py adjoining stalls in Washington market, New York. — Woman's 
Journal. 

A Wellesley College " freshwoman " writes to her home: 
" The Sophomore Class presented each new comer with a bouquet, 
and last evening invited us to a reception." There's not much 
fun in that, compared with putting each new comer under the 
pump, or making her stand the cigars, or smashing her Gains- 
borough, or breaking her parasol, or rolling her down-hill in a 
barrel. It is plain that co-education is the only way of initiating 
our young ladies into the more lively expressions of genuine 
college life. — Boston Post. 

Thanks, Mr. Boston Post, for your good cut on the college 
"boys." 

Absent-Minded Sixtli (conjugates). — " Nolo-Nellie-Nolui." 
(Omncs snickerunt.) — Ex. 

It is customary with the students in our college to say "Not 
prepared " when called upon to recite a difficult and not well- 
memorized passage. On a hot summer afternoon, in the year r 

the class was sleepily stumbling through the introduction to 
Butler's Analogy. The reverend doctor was quite as familiar 
with the subject matter as with the number of chapters and 
selections, and had a way of his own in calling for a recitation, 
which sounded quite as much like a call to judgment as a call to 
recite. The lesson was going badly, and the doctor, nestling in 

his chair, called out, " Mr. , you may pass on to the ' Future 

Life.' " Mr. T was too much of a wag to let the opportunity 

slip, and promptly responded, "Not prepared." The reader can 
easily imagine the effect on the risibles of the class. — Harper's 
Drawer. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



— BY THE — 



Lasell Publishing Association, 

— OF— 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR. 
MARGARET HAMILTON, ' 7 S. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 



M. ALICE LINSCOTT, '78. 



CARRIE KENDTO, '79. 



PUBLISHER. 
ANNA H. WHITE, ' 7 S. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS. 



IRENE G. SAN FORD, * 7 9- 

Editor's Office ■■ No. 17 Blaisdell Hall. 



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Thanksgiving Day is almost here, and none of us are very sor- 
ry. We certainly ought to be able to meet the day with suitable 
thoughts and feelings, for we all have had a great deal to be 
thankful for in the last year. If we are delivered from any sud- 
den and violent death, or our friends are restored to us even from 
the " valley of the shadow," we then feel the need to be thankful; 
but we often fail to be grateful enough for the every-day gifts and 
blessings which crown our lives, and for the kind care and pro- 
tection which has watched over and shielded us all our lives 
through. We are so used to having our daily wants and neces- 
sities provided for that we accept it all as a matter of course, and 
do not remember, as we ought, to be ever grateful for what we 
consider the common and eyery-day blessings which we are con- 
stantly receiving. 

We have had a good beginning for our " Leaves, " this year, 
and we hope our paper may improve in every issue, so that it 
may prove to be really profitable and improving, as well as enter- 
taining. 



It is really decided that we are to have the lectures on Latin Lit- 
erature by Mr. Stoddard, and we are looking forward with pleas- 
ure to the evening of December 5th, when we shall listen to the 
first of them ; for we are sure that in the hands of Mr. S. they will 
have an interest which few could give them. 



The assistant editors and their respective room-mates lately 
spent a Saturday and Sunday at the delightful home of Mr. J. H. 
Chadwick, in Boston, and perhaps those innocent maidens did not 
enjoy themselves ! 



We think that Mr. Charles Dickens would have felt flattered 
could he have heard the shouts of enthusiasm with which the 
Literature Class received his name as that of their next subject 
for study. 



There has been quite an addition to our Reading Room, in the 
shape of " The Illustrated World," — a German magazine, by 
far the finest published in that country. 



Miss Longyear has absolutely forbidden any more bad puns on 
her name. The agonies she has endured on this account have at 
last roused her to rebellion, so beware ! 

Mrs. Ferguson has returned from a visit of some length in 
Maiden, and we were all extremely glad to see her again, for she 
seems almost like a mother to some of us. 

Miss Dunsmore was made happy by a visit from her father. 

We were sorry to have Mrs. Potter leave us, for her pleasant 
face and kind ways had won all our hearts, and we shall hope to 
see her again ere long. 

The last "Social" was a most enjoyable occasion. Misses 
West, Smith, Stedman, Pew, and the Misses Ransom received, 
and we all appreciated their very successful efforts to entertain us. 

Misses Hawley of Aurora, 111., and Sanders, of Southbridge, 
Mass., girls of '75-'76 made us happy by a little visit (emphasis 
on visit, not little), last week. We were glad to see them, so com- 
fortable, notwithstanding the fact that they no more enjoy the 
advantages of Lasell. By the way, they say there is only one 
place pleasanter than Auburndale, and leave us to guess what that 
is. 

The Newton Journal must think us a set of pigmies at Lasell. 
It stated (of course by a typographical error) that Miss Linscott, 
our tallest, is only 5 ft. 1\ inches, while in -reality she is 5 ft. 6| 
inches. By the way, we have a new scholar, Miss Longyear, who 
is taller yet, having attained to the dignity of 5 ft. 1 \ inches. 

We tender our sincere sympathy to Miss Hall, our teacher in 
mathematics, last year, in the bereavement caused by the recent 
death of her brother, Hon. Ezra Hall, of Hartford, Conn. 



IassU FiilliMif AsBOolatioa. 

This association is for the purpose of continuing the publication 
of ''Lasell Leaves." Its first meeting was held in the chapel, on 
the evening of November 14th. The principal business of the 
meeting was the election of officers for the present term, which 
resulted as follows : President, Annie H. White ; Vice-President, 
Carrie Kendig ; Secretary, S. Alice Dunsmore; Treasurer, Annie 
Kendig. "Lasell Leaves" has been a great success so far, and is 
now one of the regular publications of the United States, having 
been duly entered at Washington. 

We desire very much that this association may prove a success, 
and in order that it may succeed, we most earnestly invite the 
hearty co-operation of every member of the school. 

Treasurer of the L. P. A. 



L A SELL LEA VE S. 



Long ago, in the bright October, we noticed a quiet flirtation 
going on right under our very noses ; and yet nobody seemed to 
think it would amount to anything serious after all. But I knew 
the earth was going to marry the winter, for I had seen how such 
flirtations turned out before. So it happened. I was not at'UTl 
astonished when, October having ripened into November, we, one 
morning, saw traces of winter. I knew the old fellow came 
courting, just as mortals do when they become enamoured of some 
fair damsel. At first the earth seemed a little bashful about it, 
and, as the sun rose, was careful to remove all traces of her 
ancient sweetheart's visit ; just as other sweethearts do before the 
wedding-day is set, and they want to keep it secret that they are 
"keeping company ; " but after a while, when everybody knew 
it was settled, she laid aside her desires for secrecy, and seemed 
to take a mischievous pleasure in it, for every once in »while she 
would try on her snowy bridal dress, and flirt around in it untli 
we would think, " Well, it is really coming off at last ! " 

Finally, one night, we heard a great bustle, and heard the wind 
whistling a merry waltz, and on looking out we saw the gay 
" Bachelor, merry and free," whirling his partner, the rain, round 
and round in the intricate figures, in a way that would have horri- 
fied all the deacons and elders in the parish if they had but seen it. 

Meanwhile, the earth was arraying herself in a robe of purest 
white, so light and sparkling it never could have been woven by 
human hand; the beautiful veil, woven in all imaginable figures 
was the work of Jack Frost and his attendant fairies. 

.fust as the last fold was arranged, the wind, who had rushed 
away in a great haste, in a few minutes came back to his partner, 
who had wept a little over his desertion, bringing with him, from 
the bridegroom's castle, the ancestral diamonds which had adorned 
the brides of winter ever since the world began. Suddenly there 
was a lull in the tempest, and in the stillness I fancied I heard the 
low "I will;" and then I heard the wind laugh merrily as he 
whirled off with his friend, the rain, and whispered to her some- 
thing about another wedding in the early spring. 



By 0a© of Tl©®, 

I should like to present for the consideration of the readers of 
this paper, the Literary Society lately formed at Lasell. The need 
of some such institution has long been felt in the school. A vis- 
iting stranger would be very much amused at the scene when our 
Principal brings up some matter for action by the school. First, 
there is an ominous silence ; then Prof. Bragdon suggests that 
some one make a motion. An audible smile spreads through 
the room. "Come, now ; time is going. Some one make a mo, 
tion,' — you know how," issues from the desk. Then some feeble 
sister, with "downcast look and modest mien," amid the univer- 
sal giggle, rises, and says in a trembling voice, utterly ignoring 
the chair, " I move." A faint wail is heard from the farthest cor- 
ner of the room, which the despairing chairman takes to be a 
"second," and the motion is voted upon. Everything is sure to 
receive an affirmative vote, for no timid damsel would venture a 
"no." For a company of fifty or sixty girls, who are endowed 
with the average amount of confidence, this is supremely ridicu- 
lous. Given a chance to hold an informal discussion, busy tongues 
and loud voices would be very expeditious in making known the 
sentiments of their various owners. Why can't we do it in a more 
dignified manner ? 



Now it often happens that young ladies, after leaving school, and 
when engaging in what are called the more active duties (?) of life, 
join some society for the diffusion of knowledge among the ignorant, 
or for their own culture and improvement. They know nothing 
about the duties of officers, and nothing at all about parliamentary 
etiquette, so the poor mortals, for want of a little previous cultiva- 
tion in this respect, are placed in very embarrassing positions. 

The ability to state clearly one's reasons for what one thinks, is o^ 
no small value to anybody. Nothing will make a woman, who is 
enthusiastic in the cause she espouses, more vexed than that over- 
whelming observation from masculine lips: "That's a woman's 
reason." Still, we must confess that few women are capable of 
expressing their thoughts clearly. Not because they are not 
endowed with as much talent as their brothers, but because the 
augamentative faculty has not been developed. In our Literary 
Society we propose to remedy these defects in our education. Our 
brothers in college consider "the Society" one of the great insti- 
tutions, and will stand by it if all else fail. Of course we expect 
to do what is required of us when our turn comes ; but we are all 
learners, so no one need say "can't." We are trying to learn the 
"can." 

We have had several meetings, and have quite a good start. 
We have elected the following officers : President, Alice N. Ma 
goun ; Vice-President, Lillie R. Potter ; Secretary, Hattie J. 
Clark; Treasurer, Lucy E. Curtis; Critic, M. Alice Linscott ; 
Usher, Carrie Kendig. 

We welcome cordially all who desire to join us, and to those 
who ask our advice, we say, "Come and see for yourselves." 

x. y. z. 

Comparisons are Odious. — The Major (rocking Nellie on his 
knee, for Aunt Mary's sake). — "I suppose this is what you like, 
Nellie?" Nellie. — "Yes, it is nice. But I rode on a real 
donkey, yesterday — I mean one with four legs, you know." — Ex. 

Bible Class. — This is the way you'll get tripped in Bible class 
some day, girls, if you don't study your lesson — either a little 
less or a good deal more. An Oxford undergraduate, on being 
told to describe the death of Jezebel, thus complied : "And Jehu 
said, ' Throw her down ; ' and they threw her down. And he 
said, ' Do it a second time ;' and they did so. And he said, ' Do 
it a third time ;' and they did it a third time. And they did it 
seven times, — yea, even unto seventy times seven. And last of 
all the woman died also. And they picked up the fragments that 
remained, twelve baskets full." 

Pumpkin pies and jack o-l an terns are now in season. 

A Vassar College girl, struggling with the difficulties of the 
English language, asks Richard Grant White what "Phtholo- 
gnyrrh" spells. Mr. White hasn't been heard from, but the guess 
is offered : Phth (as in phthisis) is T, olo (as in colonel) is ur, gn 
(as in gnat) is n, and yrrh (as in myrrh) is er, or Turner. Won- 
der if Mr. Turner's friends would know him if he spelt himself 
"Phth," etc. 

Logic. — A grand jury has passed the following resolutions : 
Resolved, That the present goal is insufficient, and that another 
ought to be built. Resolved, That the material of the old goal be 
employed in constructing the new one. Resolved, That the old 
goal shall not be taken down till the new one is finished. — Ex. 
That jury hadn't been in our Logic class. 

A woman of Southwick, Mass., dines in the company of her 
hundred favorite cats. — Woman's Journal. 



LA SELL LEA FES. 



"Be sure your sin will find you out." — "Thou shalt not be 
found out" is not one of God's commandments, and no man can 
be saved by trying- to keep it. — Dr. Leonard Bacon. 

Good for the girls ! This looks like the "weaker sex," don't 
it ? The report of the President of Michigan University says : 
"The proportion of women to men scarcely changes from year to 
year. The women form a little less than nine per cent, of the 
whole number of students. It is gratifying to see how readily the 
more gifted young women who have graduated here, especially 
those who have taken the full classical course, have secured con- 
spicuous positions as teachers, in the high schools, seminaries of 
advanced grade, and colleges for women. In those positions they 
are justifying the wisdom of the regents, who opened to them the 
opportunities for a thorough collegiate training, and are doing 
their full best in earning a reputation for the University.— Adv. 



The "Hub" is not infallible after all. Rejoice, and be glad, all 
ye Westerners ! — Boston's reputation is in danger. An observ- 
ing peddler passed through Litchfield County, Conn., a few days 
ago. Among other statements he made, was this : "I have lived 
thirteen years in the vicinity of Boston, where millionaires are not 
at all uncommon, but I never knew what style was till I got to 
Litchfield Hill." He did a lively business in Litchfield. — Adv. 

Worth remembering by us who are apt to get discontented at 
the monotony of school life : 

The every-day cares and duties, which men call drudgery, are 
the weights and counterpoises of the clock of time, giving its 
pendulum a true vibration, and its hands a regular motion ; and 
when they cease to hang upon the wheels, the pendulum no longer 
swings, the hands no longer move, the clock stands still. — Long- 
fellow. 



lewjr % futile 4 Co. 

COR. WASHINGTON & WINTER STS., 

BOSTON, 

Keep an immense stock of all the newest styles of 

L(&die$' <boot$, $l\oe$ ai)d $rLppei$, 

ALSO, FULL LINE OF 

STYLISH AND DURABLE LOW COST GOODS. 




KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

EEPOSITOET, 

Nos. HO & 112 Sudbury St., 

Boston, Mass. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 



Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. 0, Address, Aiiburndale. 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of allskinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.T WHOLESALE AJV» KE'l'AIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Painted' $u-p©lie£, SftW Material^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 

76 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 



FtJlIITIBE 

AT 

Paine's Manufactory, 

BOSTON. 



We take pleasure in announcing that we have opened a 
number of spacious rooms in connection with our manu- 
factory, to accommodate the retail trade of Boston and 
vicinity. Having bestowed unusual care and attention in 
finishing, we have now to offer a most complete stock of 



Fashionable Furniture 



5 



not excelled in quality or beauty of design. Our facilities 
are second to no other manufacturer in the country in ex- 
tent, light and general convenience, giving to us such 
advantages that we are enabled to sell [for ready cash 
under any dealer in this vicinity, 

rows? and cumih defameht, 



Our new stock of imported French Lambrequins, Swiss 
Lace Curtains, Ornamental French Bronzes, Reception 
Chairs, Kasels, Pedestals, M;irquetiere Tables, Plate Mir- 
rors and Parlor Cabinets far exceeds anything of the kind 
ever thown by us. 

Kich and Plain Furniture — Antique and Mod- 
ern Styles. Great Keduction 
from Former Prices. 

141 Friend & 148 Canal Sts. 



THNCAS D. 0001, 



AGENT FOR THE 



m Jbjhml Ha €nm\ #*♦ 



-AND- 



CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 
very Reasonable Bates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 

100 DOLLARS SAVED! 



Every family can save from fifty to one hundred dollars 
every year by buying of the old and well-known 

GROCERY and TEA HOUSE 

or 

C. D. COBB & BROS, 

722, 726 & 728 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



GOODS DELIVERED BY FREIGHT 
ONE HUNDRED MILES, FREE, 

For all orders of twenty-five dollars of a general assort- 
ment of goods. Don't fail to call and get, or send for, cata- 
logue of goods with prices, which will give all the partic- 
ulars. 

Send in your orders for Christmas and New Years. 

OUR PRICES ARE LOWER THAN EVER! 



DIRECT ALL ORDKKS TO 



G. D. COBB & BROS., 

722, 726 & 728 Washington St., 

BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE 
PLACE 

— TO — 

BUT 

CARPETS 

— AND — 

FURNITURE 

IS AT 

B. P. CUNNINGHAM & CO.'S, 

512 "Washington St., Boston. 

Paper Hangings, 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN, VARIETY 
UNSURPASSED, 

AT 

LOWER PRICES THAN EVER. 

Parties desiring to decorate their Homes, or purchase 
for the Trade, are invited to call upon 

J. H. ROBINSON & CO.. 

No. 40<> Washington St., Boston. 

J. H. ROBINSON. C. H. WHITMARSH. C. W. ROBINSON. 



{J-iVe can furnish the best of Paper Hang- 
ers at reduced rates. 

(Incorporated in 1S20.) 

J. H. CHA D WICK & CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVER STEEET, BOSTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Sosfom 9ww llfeite £@ai, 

DRY AND GROUND IN OIL. 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure White Lend, both dry and ground in oil, we 
warrant to be STRICTLY PURLt, and guaranteed that for 
Fineness, liody and Durability it is not surpassed by any 
Lead in the Market, either foreign or American- 

J8®*Tn order to protect ourselves we nave adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in ihe centre. This is on every package of 
our PURK LEAD. None genuine without it. 

AUSTIN GOVE & SON, 

Dealers in 



LIME, CEMENT AND BRICKS, 
2 1 'i Border St., Central Square, East Boston. 

FOR 

COME TO 



T- KNCWLiES cfc SONS, 

Wholesale unci Retail Dealers In Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCALLOPS. 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 

All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 & 123 Fanouil Hall Mirket. - - - - BOSTON. 

J. Knowles. R. II. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 



W. H. IPRKiNrCH: & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

FRANK WOOD, 
STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 

Nearly opposite Bromfii-ld Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

KTIOHEOLS cfc H^^T_jT_j 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
WHITE, SMITH & CO., 

516 Washington Street, Boston, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Hooks, Vocal 
and Viano Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 
Cantatas of " Ruth" and "Joseph," Also, 
Publishers of the Folio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $l.f!0 a year. 

ROBINSON'S CASH STORE. 

Dry ctnoZ Fctncy Goods, 

MOODY STEEET, WALTHAM. 

ALiFREID BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hoars. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New P. H, Market. & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

~hT& r. atwood, 

Wholesale and Retail 

©flfll D BALERS* 

19 Commercial & 104 South Market Streets, 

BOSTON. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 

APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 
night. 



H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

SffiQGrFOjIN), mass. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AX THE LOWEST FRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

H# o ■<;.«'. ,. i^Ii.oes' & H-u h 1> WWM 

BEPAIEINO PE0MPTL7 ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

WATERS & IN MAN, 

VyBST NBWTON -A-HSHa AUBURNDALB, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plasteb, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES TICKERS 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
Ijurndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

fl®- All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

T ^ ITVL E S VICKERS 
Auburn St., Auburndale. 



HIGGANUM MTG CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Airicultiiral Implements and Machines, 

No. 38 SOUTH MAEKET STREET, 

Boston, Mass. 

J. A. SMITH, - - Manager, 

(Formerly with Ames Plow Co.] 



FACTORY AND MAIN OFFICE AT HIGGANUM, CT. 

J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH ADD 162 LINCOLN STREETS, BOSTON, 

AND 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, 

DEALERS in 

line Tea&, Cof f ee§ f 

AND 

GROCERIES, 

AT 

T_io"v^©©t nvinx"J5it?t Prices. 
JttS^Send for Catalogue of Prices.,®* 



8 



L A SELL LEA VE S. 



ABEAM FRENCH & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods, and 
Plated Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abram French & Co. 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STR 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
JohnT. Wells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON. 



L. G. Coburn. 
Wm. A. French. 
S. Waldo French. 



PUT CriPER PADnC Nicest yet offered, with 
DILI CuULU uAnUOi your name nicely printed— 
only 10 cents per dozen. Post paid. 

W. C. CANNON, 712 Washington St. 

BOSTON. 



^l^EfCTISEJLS 




Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing- nn estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 



lHOTttMATION 



Concerning- the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertising 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



IC;OTHS,Z52^sh]ngtonSxBoston 



Joel Goldthwait & Co., 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



CARPETINGS, 



Nos. 167 & 1S9 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOSTON. 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



(Established 1847.) 

AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST,, BOSTON, 



rfatiomrs andijtanfc; 



joofcjlaroifactoma 



First-Class Account BooksEof any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAT. 



FRANK E. POTTER, M. D. 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases and Diseases of 

the Thkoat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON". 

tosieif'ieh: "W. GKE=u:a-a- 7 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in Enameled Slate 

M1ITL1S Hi BRACKET SIEL1IS, ETC. 

Also, English Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Farior Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromneld 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

GEO. E. RICHARDON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

Nut3, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c. 
1 Faueuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. FRANK B. RICHARDSON 

TAT. D. LATSSROIP, 

ATTBCBWDALE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding Stable. 

Also, Auburndale and Boston Express. 
JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Keward Cards, Velvet and Passepartout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No. 9 Boylston Market, Boston, 

THE EAGER MANUFAOTUEING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON, 

nvn. :e_ ^ D onsrxD 7 id. xd. s. 

Office, Auburn Street, 

Opposite Depot, 

^^TTBTT^.Isri3^.IjE, MASS. 

SWAN^NEWTOnT 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON 

S. B. NEWTON. 

HENRY F. MILLER, 

UPTrTP I pjfflS 



I 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments fiom this establishment aie guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 
Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



A. N. HARDY, 
PHOTO &RAPHER, 

Takes pleasure in announcing to former patrons and the 
public generally that on 

November 20th, 1877, 

He will occupy a 

NEW AND COMMODIOUS STUDIO'* 

BUILT EXPRESSLY FOR HIS BUSINESS AT 

493 Washington Strees, between Temple Place and West St. 

Grateful to customers for past patronage, we expect, 
with largely increased facilities to be prepared to give 
better satisfaction than ever before, and at the lowest 
prices consistent with good work. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 
MASS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

jfWGoods delivered free of charge. 

Grand Sfeinway Opening. 

Call in and hear the STEIJVWAYS at the 
New Warerooms of OLIVER DITSOIV <fc CO., 
Ho, 449 Washington Street, Boston. 

GRAND PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including small PARLOR GRAND, only 6 ft. 
Sin. long, and CENTENNIAL CONCERT GRAND, same 
as used by Mme. Essipoff in 162 concerts. 

SQUARE PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including SQUARE GRAND, with new frames 
never before shown in New England. jj 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

In 3 styles, including small COTTAGE PIANOS and 
CABINET GRANDS. 

Good Words for the Steinways. 

Rubinstein testifies to their " excellence and capacity 
for enduring the severest tests." 

Liszt says: "The splendid upright Piano shone to 
brilliant advantage at the festival performance at the 
Wartburg, where last Tuesday, it served under my fingers 
as ' Vice Orchestra,' exciting general admiration." 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO. 

iC PLACES AT THE HEAD," 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand Square and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Design and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 

SECURING PERMANENCE OF TONE, 

Warerooms, 484 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue, free. 



TDTJZ^L ZPZEXvLIlNr^. FACTI. 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., DECEMBER, 1877. 



Number 3. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

A. Stock of Carpets in which. Practical Purchasers 
will Ami much to Admire — Elegance, Service- 
ability and Cheapness Joined. 

This well-known firm has long been a special favorite with 
youDg housekeepers, who for the first time venture into the 
mysteries of furnishing, and ponder deeply in their girlish minds 
the various ways of creating a cosy little menage from a modest 
little purse. The stock here is essentially a practical one— not 
"too high and good for human nature's daily food," and yet 
tasteful, well-selected and complete in all the styles, old and 
new, English and French, Oriental and Occidental, artistic and 
mechanical, original and imitative, that are now competing for 
the favor of the buyer. 

The assortment of rugs at this house is notably complete and 
extensive, and the buyer may here learn from the courteous 
attendant the names of the different kinds of Oriental fabrics now 
in the market, and sludy their styles for himself. The Kelim 
rugs from Arabia and Egypt (sometimes ornamented with feath- 
ers and coins) vary very much in texture, some being very coarse, 
others much firmer and finer; but all of them have rude, barbaric 
designs in broad masses of dull reds, yellows, greens and blues, 
and are without that refined sentiment and complicated thought 
which distinguishes other Oriental fabrics. The Coula rug from 
Turkey and Smyrna is that with which we have been longest 
familiar, and is now the cheapest rug imported. It has a long, 
soft nap, and comes in all sizes, and generally in brilliant reds 
and blues. Twenty or twenty-five years ago, these were consid- 
ered very elegant for aristocratic parlors and libraries; but they 
are now too crude and "loud" for the more subdued tones of the 
modern drawing-room, and are relegated to the bed-rooms 
and sitting-rooms, where bright colors and cheerful chintzes 
still hold their own. The Bombay rug is necessarily thick 
and stout. It comes in dull crimson grounds, varied with 
small and simple black, maroon, (an and cream-white figures. 
The Niegata rugs, from Japan, are a new importation. They re- 
semble Turkish towelling in fabric, and are not all of wool ; con- 
sequently they are cheap. They are mostly white grounds, with 
indigo-blue, or pale green, or pale brown figures, and they show 
all that aitistio fueling and grace of design and eye for "effect," 
which make the Japanese the "French" of Asia and something 
more. 

The Merlin rugs and carpets, supposed to be, and generally 
called "Turkey" carpets, are an Oriental imitation that is manu- 
factured at Schineiderberg, in Breslau. The ground is uniformly 
of a splendid red, the different carpets varying only in the design 
put upon them in black, green, etc., etc. The Goerdez rugs are 
those with the brilliant yellow or red centres, or with black cen- 
tres and brilliant llowers. They are always handsome and effect- 
ive. The very newest thing in rugs is from Kurdistan. It is 
made of camel's hair, and woven so as to be used on eitho side 
indifferently, the "wrong" side sometimes being handsomer than 
the right. The costliest and choicest rugs are the Daghistan 
rugs, from Asiatic Turkey. They are made with a close, thick, 
short pile, and will wear forever. No two are alike, and they are 
covered with rich and strange devices, in the most brilliant, 
mingled with the most subdued colors, so that the whole tells us 
a complicated and fascinating story, if we could only understand 
it. One of these rugs had a bold centre of blue black, surrounded 
by an elaborate border; another was in exquisite little stripes 
covered with seemingly cabalistic characters; and a third was a 
maze of central intricacy, surrounded by many narrow borders, 
two or throe of them being of the Mussulman's sacred green. 
Nothing ever repeats itself iu these rugs. No two ends, no two 
sides, scarcely any two figures, are alike. The workman seems to 
proceed at his own sweet will, and the result in each case is an 
individual work of art, upon which one is never weary of gazing. 
The beautiful Terrachan rugs resemble the Daghistan, but are not 
so expensive. In looking at these Oriental products, so utterly 
different, all of them, from any Western textile fabrics, one won- 
ders whether the rage for them among ourselves will stimulate 
the workmen who design and weave them, into new and per- 
haps dangerous flights of imitative fanoy, or whether they will 
calmly continue to stick to the forms and colors and proportions 
of their ancestors. One ot the Goerdez rugs rather frightened 
us, it was so evidently suggested by some common-place English 
"real ist ic" carpot in roses and butterflies, and if the detestable 
"aniline" dyes should got in among them, they would ruin the 
carpets, as they have many of the shawls of the hitherto artistic 
East. 



i% af a if 

It was more than sixteen centuries before the birth of Christ, that a huge block 
of rose-grey granite was unearthed from the quarry of Syene, in lower Egypt. 

Day after day, week after week, reverent workmen, conscious of the important 
task devolving upon them, cut and polished the shapeless mass, till it grew into 
Gvmmetrical, rosy beauty, and lay, at last, completed, — a vast obelisk, seventy 
feet in length. Then there came a day when, ami 1st the applause of assembled 
crowds, the mighty shaft was raised to its place of honor, opposite a sister shaft, 
before the entrance of a temple, in the City of the Sun. There it was to stand, 
pointing ever to the sky, as the throne of the bright god whom they worshipped, 
itself an emblem of a single ray, proceeding from that god, the Sun. 

Prom accounts given by ancient historians, we can imagine somewhat the scenes 
over which the monument watched. The ruins which now mark the site of Baalbec 
attest its original grandeur. The temple itself, with its rows of sculptured columns, 
its lofty porch, its flights of steps, extended one thousand feet in length. Palaces, 
spacious gardens, fountains and temples adorned the city. 

Here gathered the wisest members of the Egyptian priesthood, forming into 
societies and schools, receiving students even from learned Greece. 

Plato, who spent considerable time in study here, gained many of the ideas 
which made him famous, from the Hebrew priests. 

To this city, Joseph is said to have brought Mary and the child Jesus, when he 
fled from the wrath of Herod, into Egypt. 

Moses, too, undoubtedly looked upon the lofty column, scorning the worship of 
which it was a symbol ; but, perhaps, feeling that it might be an emblem of his 
religion as well. So the first century of our era found it standing. 

Now had come the supremacy of Rome, aud Egypt was one of the many coun- 
tries ravaged by the armies of a Cassar. Heliopolis shared the fate of other cap- 
tured cities, in being despoiled of its works of art, to add to the beauty of the 
City of the Seven Hills. Obelisks aud monuments were transported, at great cost 
and trouble ; still, the two red granite shafts at the temple entrance were allowed 
to remain. 

At last, however, upon the erection of a temple to Augustus, at Alexandria, only 
these ancient monuments of the Sun City were deemed worthy to stand in the 
Court yard ; and hither they were removed. 

How grimly they must have looked down on the bustle and gay revelry of this 
comparatively new city ! How they must have wondered at the motley crowds, 
assembled here from all countries then subject to Rome ! It seems as if the speechless 
yet speaking stones musthave acted as a rebuke, sometimes, upon the rioting populace. 

" Familiarity breeds contempt," it is said. Doubtless in this case, as in others ; 
and so, unheeded, the lofty sentinels kept their watch for centuries. The city lost 
its original grandeur ; the temple itself fell into ruins, and was buried in shifting 
sand ; and, at last, one of the obelisks found a resting-place, prone on the earth. 

Now, after so many centuries, this venerable monument is to become the perma- 
nant guest of the City of New York. Egypt, still rich in antiquities, is to present 
one of its noteworthy objects of interest to the New World. The monolith which 
has been a spectator of the rise and fall of nations of antiquity, is to be set up in a 
noisy square of our representative city. 

Would the stone could find a voice, to relate to us reminiscences of its past ! 
Surely, surpassing those of Eastern magicians would be the tales it could unfold. 
Would, too, that the giddy crowds of to-day could feel a sense of the " stern 
watchfulness and mysterious sympathy," which Ruskin imputes to "walls that 
have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity." 

Surely, valuable lessons might be learned from so old and majestic a Mentor I 



LA SELL L E A V E S. 



Sai' ; i Wif® a 



BY MRS. KATE T. WOODS. 



Up in early morning light, 
Sweeping, dusting, "setting right;" 
Oiling all the household springs, 
Sewing buttons, tying strings; 
Telling Bridget what to do, 
Mending rips in Johnny's shoe; 
Running up and down the stair, 
Tying baby in a chair ; 
Cutting meat, and spreading bread, 
Dishing out so much per head ; 
Eating as she can by chance, 
Giving husband kindly glance ; 
Toiling, working, busy life, 
"Smart woman, 
Dan's wife." 

Dan comes home at fall of night, — 
Home so cheerful, neat and bright; 
Children meet him at the door, 
Pull him in and look him o'er. 
Wife asks "How the work has gone ? 
Busy times with us at home!" 
Supper done, Dan reads with ease : 
Happy Dan, but one to please. 
Children must be put to bed — 
AH the little prayers are said, 
Little shoes placed all in rows, 
Bed-clothes tucked o'er little toes; 
Busy, noisy, wearing life, 

Tired woman, 

Dan's wife. 

Dan reads on and falls asleep — 
See the woman softly creep. 
Baby rests at last, poor dear ; 
Not a word her heart to cheer. 
Mending basket full to top, 
Stockings, shirt, and little frock ; 
Tired eyes, and weary brain, 
Side with darting, ugly pain. 
"Never mind, 'twill pass away," 
She must work, but never play; 
Closed piano, unused books, 
Done the walks to cosy nooks; 
Brightness faded out of life, 

Saddened woman, 

Dan's wife. 

Up stairs, tossing to and fro, 
Fever holds the woman low; 
Children wander, free to play 
When and where they will, to-day; 
Bridget loiters — dinner's cold ; 
Dan looks anxious, cross, and old; 
Household screws are out of place, 
Lacking one dear, patient face ; 
Steady hands, so weak, but true, 
Hands that knew just what to do, 
Never knowing rest or play, 
Folded now and laid away ; 
Work of six, in one short life ; 

Shattered woman, 

Dan's wife. — Orange Journal. 



IfllSJi 



Photographer: — "Now, sir, if you will look 
a little less as if you had a bill to meet, a little 
more as if ye'd been left a legacy, you'll get a 
picture. — Ex. 

A Subject for Inquiry. — Scene — a work- 
house. Time — an hour before dinner. Old lady, 
not so clear as she might be (to visitor)— "Sir, 
I've a serious complaint to make. I've had no 
dinner since yesterday, and to-morrow will be 
the third day ! " — Judy. 

A little girl in North Yarmouth, Me., aged 
about three years, was taught to pray by her 
mother, who, however, could not induce the 
child to kneel. The infant was willing to pray, 
but not to bow the knee. The other morning 
the family heard the little girl' say: "Please, 
God, send me down a white rabbit ! " No an- 
swer being heard, and the child continued, "Did 
you hear what I said ? Why don't you an- 
swer?" Another pause, when the child spoke 
up spunkily, "Oh, I know what you want. You 
want me to get on my knees, but I won't." — Adv. 

Quantity Rather than Quality.— Brown, 
senior: "Well, Fred, what did you see during 
your trip abroad?" 

Brown, junior : "Aw, 'pon m' word, don't know 
what I saw, 'xactly ; only know I did more by 
three countries, eight towns, and four mountains, 
than Smith did in the same time."— Ex. 

These are good nights to strike the light 
catarrh . — Quack Advertiser. 

"She never found fault with you, never implied 
Your wrong by her right; and yet men at her side 
Grew nobler, girls purer, as through the whole town 
The children were gladder that pulled at her gown." 

— Mrs. Browning. 



College Incident.— First junior: "I say ? 
Bill, where is the Latin lesson ?" Second jun- 
ior: "On page 304 of the horse; don't know 
whei-e it is in the other book." — Adv. What 
does the boy mean? We don't understand. 



On the afternoon of November 6th, the 
Chemistry Class assembled in No. 3, to wit- 
ness experiments by a learned Bostonian. 
The amount of apparatus was really quite 
startling, and the grave face of the operator 
still more so. Quieting their fears, the 
pupils meekly took the seats assigned 
them, and waited for what was to come. 

Beautiful experiments followed each oth- 
er in quick succession, and the girls, in 
their interest seeming to forget their sur- 
roundings, unconsciously drew nearer the 
heterogeneous mass of bottles, instruments, 
etc., in the centre of the room. 

Suddenly, in the midst of this pleasant 
occupation, bang ! an explosion, and splash ! 
several quarts of TI2O form flowing rivers 
and calm lakes upon the floor. Said sheets 
of water are beautiful with picturesque 
islands of manganic dioxide, while the en- 
tire scene is considerably enlivened by 
pieces of sodium hopping about and ex- 
ploding here and there, to the terror 
of the innocent (?) maidens. It is need- 
less to add that further experiments were 
at an end for that day, at least, and we 



only hope the unfortunate operator was 
not obliged to bear alone the expense of 
replacing the material destroyed. 

Daisy Deane. 



Hi 8. n\ 

Our society is becoming of more and 
more interest, and its members grow quite 
elated as it gets on so finely, for we feel 
that its success depends on the manner in 
which it is started ; and those who have had 
the hard work of the beginning have overy 
thing to encourage them. 

The latest piece of good luck was the 
promise of the "Forum" for our society 
room, and after the coming vacation we 
are going to have it arranged in good 
style. 

An article in our last issue called atten- 
tion to our total ignorance of parliamentary 
rules, but we are happy to say that there 
is a great improvement, and now there is 
not an S. D. who is afraid to raise her voice 
in making a motion ; indeed, the desire in 
that direction is so strong, that the Presi- 
dent is often obliged to inform them that it 
is not parliamentary for more than one to 
speak at the same time. 

Our president ! is she not an honor to her 
sex ? Who of us would have believed that 
the merry, fun loving No. 2 could have so 
much dignity, and keep such a straight 
face, when right opposite sits one of our 
members who is never satisfied unless she 
is doing something laughable. In our 
opinion, the usher has about as interesting 
a position as any one ; for is she not at lib- 
erty to show her gracefulness in shutting 
windows, etc.? And then the fun of carry- 
ing that cute little ballot-box ! We think 
she deserves a compliment for the tasteful 
manner in which those candles were ar- 
ranged last Friday evening. 

There is a saying that women never can 
give any other reason for a thing than 
"because;" but no member of our society 
can now be accused of that. It is quite a 
thrilling sight to see how excited the de- 
bates become sometimes. Recently one of 
the speakers had so many arguments on 
her side of the question, that she was utter- 
ly unable to tell them fast enough, and was 
obliged to take her seat in a dangerously 
nervous state of mind and body. But we 
are sure that this embarrassing rush of ideas 
will become, after a while, second nature, 
as it were, and nothing dangerous will 
result from them. At the next meeting 
new officers will be elected for next term, 
and candidates for admission should have 
their names proposed. Know-Nothing. 



LASELL LEA VES. HOLIDA Y AD VER TISEMEMTS. See also pages 5, 6, 7, 8. 



POTTERY DECORATIONS. 

W. C WHITCOMB, 

Wholesale and Retail 

PICTURE STORE. 

Scrap-Book Pictures and Chromos, Colored Paper and 
Card Board; Picture Frames and Passe-partouts 
to order; Photographs, Children's Scrap-Book's. 

40 Brom/'ield Street, Boston. 

A I BYT* K." PRI can find an endless variety of 
LI I I LC US 'It- Christmas Goods— Articles and 
Materials for making useful and pleasing presents at small 
cost, but all the more acceptable to your friends. Floral 
Passe-partouts; Framed Pictures from 25 cts. up; Jap- 
anese (Camphorwood) Boxes ; Toy Parasols, etc Patterns 
for fancy work in Wood I Splints (40 patterns for 10 cts.); 
the new game, "Nice and Naughty;" Scrap-Books and 
Pictures; WoodSplints; Straws; Gold, Silver, Fancy and 
Tissue Papers; Embossed Pictures for Decorating Pottery, 
etc.; Merit Cards .cheap); S. S. Cards; Text and Book 
Marks; Patterns for Vases and Card Baskets; Picture 
Mottoes; Paper Dolls; "Shadows on the Wall," etc., etc. 

J. JAY GOULD, 16 Bromtteld St., Boston. 

GALV1N BROTH JS JR. S ' 

CONSERVATORIES, 

Scarboro' Street, Jamaica Plain, 

Are the most extensive and best appointed m New 
England. 

Fresh Flowers are cut every hour, and on sale at then- 
Store, 

61 TREMONT STREET. 



IILHOUETTES. 

Something Sure to Please All. 

A Series of Humorous and Characteristic Sketches. 
Mirth provoking and exceedingly interesting to old and 
young. By the the celebrated artist, K. T. Church. 

Quarto 9x9 inches, paper covers, in neat envelopes ; two 
series sold separately. 50 cents each. 

Sold by all Booksellers and Newsmen, and sent postpaid 
on receipt of the price, by 

E-iTES «& LVUIUVT, Boston. 



W. P. BIGKLOW cS& CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Worsted Shawls, Jackets, Hoods, Afghans, &c. 

And dealers in Trimmings, Zephyr Wools, Varus, Buttons, 
Corsets, Baskets and Thread Store Articles, 

56 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON. 



ST. JOACHIM BAZAR, 

HEADQUARTERS FOE 

HOLIDAY ©OOBS. 

329 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



CI® 



O 



9 



Importers and Retailers of 

DRESS TRIMMINGS, FRENCH FLOWERS, FEATHERS 

HATS, LACKS, RUCKING, TIES, GLOVES, 

CORSETS, UNDERWEAR, HOSIERY 

AND WORSTED GOODS. 

Agents tor Frank Leslie's Patterns. 
No. 39 WBNTER STREET, BOSTON. 




FASHIONABLE 



STATIONERS, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding and Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Inn elopes are 

elegant and bie-xpenfeive. 



HOLIDAY BOOKS ! 



BIBLES, PRAYER BOOKS, 

AND 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS. 

Tbe largest and lowest priced stock in Boston. 



W. B. CLAEKE. 



340 Washington Street, 

East side, midway between Milk and Franklin Streets. 

Periiioi's Paris Kid Gloves ! 

splendid Assortment 

FOB 111 HOLIDAYS I 

Suede Gloves, 

Dogskin Gloves, 

Castor Gloves, 

AND 

Kid Mittens, 

Of the Lest Qualities and Lest Assortment to be found. 

R. H. STEARNS & CO., 

131 & 132 Tremont Street. 

" WINTER DECORATIONS, 

PRESSED FERNS, AUTUMN LEAYES, 

Including a very choice lot of SUMACS. 
GREEN Moss for arranging ferns. 

MOSS BALLS for hanging ferns. 

SOUTHERN MOSS. 
DRIED FLOWERS for Winter Bouquets. 
GRASSES in variety. 

WIRE for arranging' Genus of Leaves. 
FERN AND AUTUMN LEAF DECORATION. 
Pottery Embossed Pictures and Japanese Decalcoma- 
nies for decorating Pottery. 

FOB SALE AT 

Halliday's, 29 WestStreet,Boston. 

^■TliESUNTA ITON GOODS. 



Palmer, Bachelder & Co. 

Call attention to their Sterling 
Silver Table Ware and Fancy 
Case Silver, Paris Clocks, Faience 
Vases and Plaques, Decorated 
French China and other Orna- 
mental articles suitable for pre- 
sentation occasion s. 

Palmer, Bachelder & Co. 

,'ii>4: Washington St., Boston. 



HOLIDAY PRESENTS ! 



LESS PRICE THAN ELSEWHERE. 



FRAMED PICTURES, 
ENGRAVINGS, 
CHROMOS, 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The above will embrace the finest Pictures in each line, 
at lower prices than can be found in the city. 

SPLENDID NEW STYLES OF 

VELVET FRAMES 

AND 

PASSE-PARTOUTS, 

AT LOWEST PRICES. 

Large assortment of Russia Leather and Turkey Morocco 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

AT WHOLESALE PRICES. 

FRAMING 

IN EVERY STYLE AND PRICE. 

Collier & Perkins, 

36 TV^SHIJSTG-'rOJNr STREET. 



RICHARD SCHWARZ'S 



(jRAND ASIHTAL DISPLAY OF 




FANCY GOODS, 



GAMES, 



AND 



NOVELTIES, 



497 & 499 Washington St., Boston. 



Between' Temple Place and West St. 



A CALL IS CORDIALLY SOLICITED TO EXAMINE THE 



Grand Christmas Exhibition. 



4 



LA SELL LEA FES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE — 

Lasell Publishing Association, 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY, FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

EDITOR. 
MARGARET HAMILTON, ' 7 3. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 
M. ALICE LINSCOTT, '78. CARRIE KENDIG, '79. 



PUBLISHER. 
ANNA H. WHITE, '78. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS. 
IRENE G. SANFORD, '79. S. ALICE DUNSMORE, '78 



Editor's Office : No. 17 Blaisdell Hall. 

PtMisher'' s Office : No. 8 Happy Hall. 

TERMS, IN ADV ANCE. 

One Copy, one year, (including postage) 75 cts. 

Single Numbers, ----- 10 cts. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


1-12 column, 
1-6 


$2.00 
4.00 


$3-50 
7.00 


$5.00 
IO.OO 


1-4 " 


5.00 


8.00 


12.00 


1-2 


9.00 


15.00 


22.00 


3-4 " 
1 


I2.00 
15.00 


21.00 
26.00 


30.00 

35-oo 



Frank Wood, Printer, 352 Washington Street, Boston. 

We wish you all a very merry Christmas 
and a very happy New Year ! 

In the midst of our Christmas cheer, 
when we gather around our warm fires, and 
enjoy our pleasant family meetings, let us 
remember how many happy times we have 
enjoyed in all the year ; how we have been 
kept and shielded from all harm ; have had 
so many blessings to make our lives worth 
the living, and so little care and sorrow to 
weigh us down; and, remembering all these 
things, we ought not to forget to return 
thanks to the Giver of "every good and 
perfect, gift." 

The first term of our school year is clos- 
ing, and we are about to separate and go 
to our homes. May we return with strength 
and spirit renewed, and freshened by our 
holiday. 

The success of our paper, thus far, has 
been very gratifying to all its friends; and 
we are sure that we echo the wishes of all, 
when we express our hope that its future will 
grow brighter and brighter as the years add 
experience and age gives us confidence. 

Thanking you for your kind help and 
sympathy, we wish you, again, all joy in 
the coming holidays. 



We are very sorry to hear of the sick- 
ness which has been among our friends at 
Wellesley, caused by scarlet fever. We 
cannot be too thankful that the worst is 
now supposed to be past, and that the epi- 
demic has not reached our school circle in 
its terrible rounds of sickness and death. 
Indeed, the uniform good health of Lasellians 
has always been remarkable. Wellesley 
will not open again until after Christmas, 
by which time those who are sick will have 
recovered, and there will be no danger for 
those who return. 



The fac simile of the first Boston news- 
paper, which was lately donated to our 
library, is a very interesting and valuable 
relic of by-gone days. This ancient publi- 
cation of four pages was first issued in 
1704, as a weekly paper. Doubtless it 
gained great popularity, and was consid- 
ered quite an extensive affair ; but when 
we compare its diminutive columns with 
the well-filled Boston papers of to-day, a 
great improvement is noticeable, which, in 
a degree, suggests to us the vast literary 
progress of that famous city. While glanc- 
ing over the " Bofton News Letter," our 
attention is drawn to the following par- 
agraphs ; the words look so queer, that 
we stop and read : " Her Majefty came, 
this day, to the houfe of Peers, attended 
with the ufual Solemnity," etc. Farther 
down the page we notice an advertisement 
which informs the public that "All perfons 
who have any Houfes, Lands, Veffels, Stores 
or Merchandizes or Goods, etc., to be fold 
or let; or any Run-away Slaves or Goods 
Stole or Lost," may have the same inserted 
in that paper "at a reafonable rate." Our 
thanks are gratefully extended to Miss 
Blaisdell, who has so kindly procured for us 
this curious memento of " Y e olden times." 



The closing exercises of the term take 
place on the 17th, 18th and 19th of this 
month. The usual written examinations 
will fill up the morning hours, and on the 
evening of the 17th, the soiree, by the 
students in music, takes place. 



The second of Mr. Stoddard's lectures 
on Latin Literature (subject: "Horace") oc- 
curs on Tuesday evening, and no more pleas- 
ant entertainment could be found with which 
to close this busy term than a lecture on 
that interesting subject, made so charming 
by the skilful hands of Mr. Stoddard. 
Wednesday noon, the school closes for the 
usual holiday, and after a happy and restful 
vacation, we hope to see all our friends 
back again. 



We would direct the attention of all who 
are considering the subject of Christmas 
presents, to the special advertisements con- 
tained in the present number having direct 
reference to the needs of the coming holi- 
days. Gifts selected at any of the reliable 
establishments named cannot fail to make 
the recipients enter heartily into the pro- 
verbial merriment of Christmas. 



The holidays are coming, and the young 
women of Lasell are looking forward with 
eagerness to the good time which the vaca- 
tion brings. The greater part of our num- 
ber will go to their own homes for Christ- 
mas ; but there are a few who, coming from 
a distance, cannot avail themselves of this 
privilege. So far as we have been able to 
ascertain, Misses Bragdon, Carter, Duns- 
more, Hamilton, and Mattie Ransom will 
remain at Lasell, in order that " Santa 
Claus " may not find all the rooms vacant 
when he makes his annual visit. Miss 
Hays is to accompany Miss Holbrook to 
her home in Milford, and Miss Brooks will 
spend the vacation with her room-mate, 
Miss Watts, in Boston. We also hear that 
Miss Sadie Ransom is anticipating " a 
splendid time " at the home of Miss Ida 
Phillips, of '76, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
Miss Hatch, with her aunt, in Stoneham. 



Whereas, It has seemed best to our 
Heavenly Father to afflict our much loved 
comrade, Hattie J. Clark, by the death of 
her father, — 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 
S. D. Society, extend to our bereaved sis- 
ter our warmest and most heartfelt sympa- 
thy. 

Resolved, That her absence by reason of 
so sad an event casts a gloom over us, her 
mates. 

Resolved, That it is our earnest prayer 
that the God of the fatherless, who does not 
willingly afflict, will comfort and sustain 
our mourning sister, and be the refuge and 
support of the stricken family in this hour 
of its sorest need. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be ■ in- 
serted in the Lasell Leaves, and a copy be 
sent to our bereaved sister. 



Lucy E. Curtis, 
Alice N. Magoun 



,} 



Committee. 



L A S E L L LEA V E S, 



n 



"Wbat I law ii Jsnualem. 

On the evening of Wednesday, December 
5th, we had the pleasure of listening to a 
most entertaining and instructive lecture 
on the above subject, by Mr. Stoddard. 
The lecturer gave us a very vivid and 
truthful idea of the Holy City as it exists 
at the present day, and we followed him 
with great interest through the various 
scenes which he presented to our view. 

Mr. Stoddard, after describing the terri- 
ble sufferings which the Jews had under" 
gone, said : 

"At this moment, in spite of long centuries of 
cruel persecution and degredation, see how far 
from extinct is the Jewish type of face and char- 
acter, — a phenomenon unparalleled in history. 
Observe, too, how vast an influence the Jewish 
mind still exerts, not only upon the affairs of 
Europe, but also of the world. You can hardly 
point to a great intellectual movement in 
Europe in which the Jews have not been active 
participants. The first Jesuits were Jews. The 
great intellectual revolution in Germany during 
the past century has been developed largely 
under the influence of the Hebrew mind. The 
majority of the professorial chairs in the Univer- 
sities of Germany, are at present occupied by 
men of Hebrew descent! Neander, the great 
light of Christian exposition, and Professor of 
Divinity at Berlin, was a Jew. Benary, in the 
same University, is a Hebrew. Wehl of Heidel- 
berg, the first Arabic scholar in the world, and 
the author of the Life of Mahomet, was a de- 
scendant of the Israelites. So was the German 
poet, Heine; the German novelist, Berthold 
Aueibach, author of 'On the Heights ; ' while 
the Hebrew, Benedict Spinoza, was the 'Father 
of Modern Philosophy.' In the same category 
must be placed the first violinist of all Europe, 
Joachim; the wonderful French actresses, Ra- 
chel and Sarah Bernardt; and that great com- 
poser and pianist, at whose feet we have all sat 
entranced, Anton Rubenstein. The great mar- 
shals of the first Napoleon, Soult and Massena, 
were Jews. The present Russian Minister of 
Finance; the former Prussian diplomat, Count 
Arnim ; the French statesman, Jules Simon ; 
and the great Republican leader, Gambetta, are 
all of Hebrew descent. The present Mayors of 
Southampton, Portsmouth, Liverpool, and Lon- 
don are Jews. The Jewish Rothschilds can 
buy empires with their wealth, while the Hebrew, 
Benjamin Disraeli, is to-day the Premier of the 
Queen's dominions ! 

"It is wonderful to read, after eighteen hundred 
years of galling slavery, such a record as this of 
the descendants of those once proud inhabitants 
of the heights of Zion. But the story is not yet 
ended . Rarely, if ever, has the equal been pro- 
duced of those immortal poems composed and 
sung by the rivers of Babylon, when the sad 
minstrels wept as they sung. And now I let 
Disraeli himself speak. He says : 'At this mo- 
ment musical Europe is ours. There is not a 
company of singers, not an orchestra in a single 
capital that is not crowded with our children 
under the feigned names which they adopt to 



conciliate the dark aversion which your poster- 
ity will one day disclaim with shame. Almost 
every great composer, almost every skilled mu- 
sician, almost every voice that ravishes you with 
its transporting strains, springs from our tribes. 
The catalogue is too vast for us to enumerate. 
Enough for us, that the three great creative 
minds to whose exquisite inventions all nations 
at this moment yield homage— Rossini, Meyer- 
beer, and Mendelssohn — are of Hebrew race. 
And little do your men of fashion, your musca- 
dins of* Paris, and your dandies of London, 
realize, as they thrill into raptures at the notes 
of a Pasta, or a Grisi, that they are offering their 
devotion to the 'sweet singers of Israel.' " 



Pmnili. 

We were all much grieved by the loss 
which our friend, Miss Hattie Clark, has re- 
cently met with in the death of her father. 
We sympathize most earnestly with Miss 
Clark in her affliction, and sadly miss her 
bright face from among us. 

Lost, Strayed, or Stolen. — A crochet- 
needle, with a hook at each end. Any one 
finding this valuable article, will very much 
oblige Miss Haskell by returning it to No. 
10, Happy Hall. 

As an example of the promptness of our 
young women, we would merely mention 
the fact that after Thanksgiving vacation 
each pupil of Lasell was either in her place 
at the time appointed, or satisfactorily ac- 
counted for. 

Quantities of bright zephyrs and dainty 
ribbons are mysteriously floating about 
these days, telling as plainly as could 
words, that the "merry Christmas time" is 
drawing near. 

Miss Hatch will spend a portion of her 
Christmas vacation at Stoneham, Mass. 
Miss Potter will pass the time very pleas- 
antly at Providence. 

Miss Chamberlayne, a former precep- 
tress of Lasell, whom many of the old girls 
affectionately remember, is spending the 
winter at Geneva, Switzerland. 

A noise was heard in the hall the other 
evening, "Combs ! " said one. "Oh, no ! 
it's L. C, singing." 

Judging from Mr. Stoddard's very inter- 
esting lecture on "What I Saw in Jerusa- 
lem," we decide that the Holy City is a 
"delusion aud a snare," and that in this 
case, certainly, " distance lends enchant- 
ment." 

The snow has at last come to gladden 
our hearts, and the earth is to-day wrapt in 
its white mantle. (P. S. That, too, was a 
"delusion." All gone ! ) 



Notman & Campbell, 
montreal, and 4 park st., 

BOSTON. 



BRANCHES at 

NEW HAVEN, CONN., AND E ASTON, PENN. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London 1862 ; Paris 1867 ; Philadelphia (Centennial) 1876. 

Class Photographers. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

In every style, from Carte de Visite to life size. 



COPYING 

In all its branches, and finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color, and Oil. 



NEGATIVES PRESERVED FOR FUTUREORDERS. 



A GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICE 

MADE TO 

SEMINARIES AND CLERGYMEN. 

DRESS REFORM. 




DRESS REFORM is improved Undergarments insuring 
health, ease, and grace, and consisting of the Knit Suit, 
the Bunt Corset, the Chemiloon, and the Skirt and Panier 
combined. 

Tlxe Reform Boot is thoroughly comfortable and 
stylish. Garments made to order, also cut and basted 
Patterns sold. Letters of inquiry answered promptly. 

DRESS REFORM COMPANY, 

MRS. MARY MOORE READ, 

25 WINTER STREET, 

Room 15, 

BOSTON. 

Permanent Centennial Exposition— North of F 69. 



6 



L A S E L L L EA V E S. 



Miss Ellen U. Clark, class of '70, re- 
cently returned from a year's study in St. 
Petersburg, is teaching French in Boston. 

A cheery report comes to us from Miss 
Grace Perkins, of "77. "She is helping 
her mother this year." A most praisewor- 
thy pursuit, and one in which every girl 
should feel it an honor and a precious priv- 
ilege to engage. Also studying German 
and book-keeping. Glad she don't stop 
study. 

Thanksgiving, with its "glorious turkey," 
is past, and now we girls are looking 
forward with delight to the holidays, and a 
good long rest of two weeks. 



Miss Blanche Bennett, of '73, we hear 
is creditably hllingthe position of teacher of 
belles-lettres, etc., at Mount Allison Wes- 
leyan Academy, Sackville, N. B. 

For the benefit of those who are inter- 
ested, we would say that the little Florence 
Moulton Merrick is as sweet a specimen of 
babyhood as one could wisli to see. 

Miss Sadie Smith, of '76, is laboring 
successfully as an instructor in vocal music 
in her native town. West Chatham, Mass. 

Miss Grace Perley, of '76, is now in 
Boston, studying elocution under the direc- 
tion of Professor Kelly, and, we hear, gives 



promise of high attainment in that depart- 
ment. 



Itgmi, 

The New York Times has the following 
on the woman question : — To attempt to 
keep woman out of the pulpit appears base 
ingratitude, for, the world over, women form 
the bulk of church organizations, are the 
chief attendants at church, and, to a great 
extent, keep churches together. — Ex. 

Pocahontas was twelve years of age 
when she saved the life of Captain John 
Smith. 



Henry % fuHle 4 Go. 



COR. WASHINGTON & WINTER STS., 

BOSTON, 

Keep an immense stock of all the newest styles of 

l(&die$' <Boot£, $l)oe$ kqd $lipper^, 

ALSO, FULL, LINE OF 

STILISH AND DDKABLE LOW COST GOODS. 




KIMBALL BROTHERS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

|W {|ama0es mi tfUi$lp> 

EEPOSITOET, 

Nos. HO & 112 Sudbury St., 

Boston, Mass. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

i,Wholcsale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE, COUNTRY 



MILK. 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube 1 Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.X WHOLESALE AjV1» KETAU, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Paiiite^' 0u-p-plie^, &ftijft£' Material^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 




AT 



Paine's Manufactory, 

BOSTON. 



Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P. 0. Address, Auburndale, 



We take pleasure in announcing that we have opened a 
number of spacious rooms in connection witn our manu- 
factory, to accommodate the retail trade of Boston and 
vicinity. Having bestowed unusual care and attention in 
finishing, we have now to offer a uioct complete stock of 



Fashionable Furniture 



? 



not excelled in quality or beauty of design. Our facilities 
are second to no other manufacture! iu the country in ex- 
tent, light and general convenience, giving to us such 
advantages that we are enabled to sell if or ready cash 
under any dealer in this vicinit}". 

UKOmE&T MB emus mmm, 




rors and Parlor Cabiutts far exceeds anything of the kind 
ever shown by us. 

Mich and Plain Furniture — Antique and Mod- 
ern Styles. Great Reduction 
from Former Prices. 

141 Friend & 148 Canal Sts. 



TIQMAS B. CC 



AGENT FOR THE 



Sijut Jtitfllawl hi turn Co-. 



1 



-AND— 



CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 

Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 
very treasonable Bates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 

PMIMCHBIMSnEmii'S! 

The adulteration of spices has become almost a univer- 
sal practice, and there is a general complaint by House- 
keepers. We have been convinced for a long time that 
every family would fully appreciate the advantage of 
knowing of a place where they can procure, and rely on 
yeltinii, PURE SPICES. 

Our Spices have gained such a reputation for PURITY 
and STRENGTH, that the demand for them is increasing 
daily. 

THEY ARE GROUND EXPRESSLY FOR US 

By one of the OLDEST, MOST EXTENSIVE and RELI- 
BLE Spice Houses in the New England States, and every 
package has on it their name, with the warranty of the 
PURITY of the goods. Our prices are as low, if not lower, 
than what you have to pay for adulterated goods at other 
places. 

We wish to say to all those who have never bought of 
us, on account of low prices, to just La« a»iJU)»«j 
p»*jfc.Ji DICK, and give us a trial, and be convinced 
that we are determined to make good what we advertise. 

READ THE LOW PRICES! 

Strictly Pure Cassia 40 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Cloves 45 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Allspice 25 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Pepper, BlacL - - - - 25 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Pepper, Cayenne - - - 30 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Pepper, White - • - - 38 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Ginger, Yellow - - - 15 c. lb. 

Strictly Pure Ginger, Brown - - - 15 c. lb. 

Strictly Pnre Cream Tartar - - - 40 c. lb. 

Extra No. 1 Nutmegs .... $1.00 lb. 

GOODS DELIVERED ONE HUNDRED MILES FREE 
for all orders of Twenty-five Dollars for a general assort- 
ment of goods. Call and get or send for Catalogue of 
goods, with prices, which will give all the particulars. 
Remember, the place where to get PURE SPICES is at 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

PRINCIPAL WAREHOUSE, 

722, 726 AND 728 WASHINGTON ST, BOSTON. 

BRANCH STORES. 

140 Hanover St., Boston. 1311 and 1313 Wash. St., Boston. 

2235 Wash. St., Boston. Cor. Main & Milk Sts., Westboro. 

145 and 147 Main Street, Fitchburg. 



LA SELL LEAVES, 



THE 
PL AC E 

— TO — 

BUY 

CARPETS 

— AND — 

FURNITURE 

IS AT 

B. P. CUNNINGHAM & CO.'S, 

512 Washington St., Boston. 

Paper Hangings, 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN, VARIETY 
UNSURPASSED, 

AT 

LOWER PRICES THAN EVER. 

Parties desiring to decorate their Homes, or purchase 
for the Trade, are invited to call upon 

J. H. ROBINSON & CO., 

IVo. 400 Washington St., Boston. 

;. H. ROBINSON. C. H. WHITMARSH. C. W. ROBINSON. 



f%g~We can furnish the best of Paper Hang- 
ers at reduced rates. 

BOSTON LEAD ۩* 

(Incorporated in 1829.) 

J. H. CHA D WICK & CO. 

AGENTS, 

Office, 22, 24 & 26 OLIVER STEEET, BOSTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OE 

®®sten 9 mm Wife Sea®, 

DRY AND CROUND IN OIL. 

Dry and Ground Zinc, Litharge, Red Lead, Lead Pipe, 
Sheet Lead, Tin Pipe, Tin-Lined Pipe, Iron Pipe and 
Fittings, Pumps, etc., etc. 

Our Pure White Lead, lioth dry and ground in oil, we 
warrant to be STRICTLY PUlth, and guaranteed that for 
Fineness, Body and Durability it is not surpassed by any 
Lead in the Market, either foreign or American. 

XE3~In order to protect ourselves we nave adopted as 
our trade-mark an eight-pointed RED STAR with our 
corporate seal in t lie centre. This is on every package of 
our PURE LEAD. None genuine without it. 

AUSTIN GOVE & SON, 

Dealers in 



LIMB, CEMENT AND BRICKS, 
212 Border St., Central Square, East Boston. 

FOR 

immt Mete Wmpm^ f 

COME TO 

Soffliig's, 31©sti@n B 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SSALLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Rait. 
All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls 121 & 123 Faneuil Hall Mirtst. .... BOSTON. 

J. Knowles. R. II. Knowles. J. A. Knowles. 



^W, H. FRENCH &c CO. 
Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

frank. wood, 
steam: printer, 

352 Washington Street, 

Nearly opposite Bromfleld Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

ixrii: o:e3:o:l_jS db i3:^^.TjT_j 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers cf BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
WHITE, SMITH &, CO., 

516 Washington Street, Bo -ton, Music Publishers 
and Dealers in Sheet Music ai d Music I looks, Vocal 
and 1'i.i no Studies, both Foreign and American, 
Instruction and Recreation, i.ooks, the New 
Cantatas of " Ruth "and "Joseph," Also, 
Publishers of the Kolio, the great Mu- 
sical Monthly, only $l.(iO a year. 

ROBINSON'S CASH STORE. 

Dry CLncL Fancy Goods, 

MOODY STREET, WALTHAM. 

.^ X\j IF 1 IER. E ID IB 1R. XT S lEI, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 



A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New F. H, Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston, 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

H. & R. ATWOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail 

19 Commercial & 104 South Market Streets, 

BOSTOIT. 

C SARGENT BIRD, 
APOTHECARY, 

AUBURN ST., AUBURNDALE. 

Perfamery, Toilet Articles, Patent Medicines, etc. 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately prepared, day and 

night. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

BBiQiQKT©e)), MASS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AX THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

GL HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

EEPAIKING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

W ATE US & IN MAN, 

WEST NBWTON -A-KTID ATTBTJ I* INT IZ> .A. I-. EJ „ 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

4®" All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

JAMES VIOKERS, 
Auburn St., Auburndale. 

HIGGANUM M'FG CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OE 

Agricultural Implements and Machines, 

No. 38 SOUTH MARKET STREET, 

Boston, Mass. 

J. A. SMITH, - - Manager, 

[Formerly with Ames Plow Co.] 



FACTORY AND MAIN OFFICE AT HIGGANUM, CT. 

J. W. DAVIS & CO., 

97 AND 99 BEACH AND 162 LINCOLN STREETS, BOSTON, 

AND 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, 



DEALERS IN 



H&e Teae, 



**9 

AND 



m 



GROCERIES, 



AT 



LoTTvest ZEVTarrlsLe^t Prices. 
jBWSend for Catalogue of Prices..®* 



8 



L A S E L L LEA V E S . 



* ABRAM FRENCH & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CROCKERY, 

China, Glassware, Fancy Goods, and 
Plated "Ware. 

All Goods used at this Establishment furnished by 
Abkaii French & Co., 

89, 91 and 93 FRANKLIN STREET, 



(Corner Devonshire,) 



Abram French. 
John T. Wells. 
L. E. Caswell. 



BOSTON 



L. G. Coburn. 
Wm. French. 
S.Waldo French. 



PUT EnftCn fADilQ Nicest yet offered, with 

UILI-LUUlU uHnUOi your name nicely printed— 
only 10 cents per dozen. Post paid. 

W. C. CANNON, 712 Washington St., 

BOSTON. 



MJYERTiaEEa 



Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 




IHFORHATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisine 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



ICEVANM52WashjngtonSt:Boston 



Joel Goldtiiwait & Co,, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



CARPETINGS, 



Nos. 1S7 & 169 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOSTON, 



JOEL GOLDTHWAIT. 
FRANCIS H. KNIGHT. 



WM. H. BLODGETT. 
DARWIN E. RANNEY. 



(Established 1847.) 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 



130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 



it ll) J) m 

Stationers and Many book Manufacturers 

First-Class Account Books 01 any desired 
pattern made to order. 



FRANK E. POTTER, M. D. 

Attention paid to Surgical Cases and Diseases of 

the Throat and Larynx. 
Office hours, 1 till 3 P. M. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON. 

JOSE^'H -W. G-ZFUZOG-, 

Manufacturer of and Sealer in Enameled Slate 

MANTLES Hi BMCKET SHELVES, ETC* 

Also, Entrlisli Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Parlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bronifield 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

Nuts, Raisins, Figs, Sardines, Cigars, Tobacco, Sec. 

1 Faneuil Hall Sq., Boston. 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON. FRANK E. RICHARDSON 

\AT. D. LATHROP, 

AUBUBWDALE, 

Livery, Hack and Boarding Stable. 

Also, Auburndale and Boston Express. 
JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No, 9 Boylston Market, Boston. 

THE EAGEE MANUFAOTUKIiTG COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager&Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Hanufaoiurers of "The Ironclad" Fasts and Overalls, 

39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

ZMT. IE. TPOISTTD, ID. ID. S. 



Office, Auburn Street, 

Opposite Depot, 

SWAN «5c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTOM, 



HENRY SWAN. 
S. B. NEWTON. 



S. S. GAY. 



EDWIN S. GAY 



HENRY F. MILLER, 

HMO IBETI MAHOTACT'B, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

DILLINGHAM PAPER CO. 
Wholesale Paper Dealers, 

Office, 31 FEDERAL STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



A. N. HARDY, 
PHOTOGRAPHER, 

Takes pleasure in announcing to former patrons and the 
public generally, that on 

November 20th, 1877, 

He will occupy a 

NEW AND COMMODIOUS STUDIO 

BUILT EXPRESSLY FOR HIS BUSINESS AT 

493 Washington Street, between Temple Place and West St. 

Grateful to customers for past patronage, we expect, 
with largely increased facilities, to be prepared to give 
better satisfaction than ever before, and at the lowest 
prices consistent with good work. 

PLUTA & HILLS, ■ 

PH0VISI01T STOUE, 

AUBURNDALE, 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt 
with Fresh Vegetables in their season. 

4iSPGoods delivered free of charge. 

Grand Sfeinway Opening. 

Call in and hear the STEIN WAYS at tile 
New Warerooms or OLIVER BITSOJV &, CO., 
IVo. 449 Washington Street, Boston. 

GRAND PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including small PARLOR GRAND, only 6 ft. 
Sin. long, and CENTENNIAL CONCERT GRAND, same 
as used by Mme. Essipoff in 102 concerts. 

SQUARE PIANOS, 

In 5 styles, including SQUARE GRAND, with new frames 
never before shown in New England. 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

In 3 styles, including small COTTAGE PIANOS and 
CABINET GRANDS. 

Good Words for the Steinways. 

Rubinstein testifies to their " excellence and capacity 
for enduring the severest tests." 

Liszt says: "The splendid upright Piano shone to 
brilliant advantage at the festival performance at the 
Wartburg, where, last Tuesday, ic served under my fingers 
as ' Vice Orchestra' exciting general admiration." 

HALLET, DAVIS & CO 

"MED AT THE HEAD," 

The Highest Medal of Honor and Diploma of Merit 
at the 

CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

Awarded our Grand Square and Upright Pianos, 

For Volume of Tone, 

Good Construction, 

Excellence of Workmanship, 

And because of originality of Desiyn and Artistic 
Skill in our 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ingenious combination of mechanical devices for 
SECURIN& PERMANENCE OF TONE. 
Warerooms, 184 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue, free. 





"X3TJ.2S1 iniElVLIIXr^ PAOTI." 



Volume III. 



L/VSELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., JANUARY, 1878. 



Number 4. 



Confidence is a plant of slow growth, whether it is 
shown in business, politics or religion. Men will support 
other men financially or politically, if they have confi- 
dence in their integrity anil industry. The public gener- 
ally will uphold those men in whom they have confidence, 
and they will patronize those firms in business whose 
word has never been questioned or proved unworthy. 
Never in the whole history of our Country, have we felt 
the need of confidence more in bu.sine.is. 

The reckless methods of doing business, induced by the 
war-times and the financial insecurity of the past four 
vears, have made us cautious and slow to place our trust 
In anything or anybody. It seems, then, that the public 
should know whn to buy of and what firms are reliable. 

Among the firms iii Boston who have the entire 
confidence of the community, 

Messrs. John H. Pray, Sons & Co., 

OF 

558 and 560 Washington St. 

the well-known carpet dealers, stand high upon the list. 

Since 1817, father and sons have dealt with the people 
in their line of goods, and they have established a repu- 
tation which many old Boston firms fully appreciate, and 
which the younger ones may well strive to secure. 

The permanent and profitable success they have 
achieved is a gratifying example of the result of fair and 
honorable dealing." The facl that they hare not a large 
building with modern conveniences at an exorbitant 
rent, allows them to sell goods at a very reasonable profit, 
though, as the public are aware, they have abundant 
facilities for transacting the immense business their 
books annually record. As usual, they are now making 
extensive preparations for the 

SPRING TRADE 

OF 

18 7 8. 

Of all the usual grades of high and low-priced 

Carpetings, 
Mattings, 
Oil Cloths, 

they have a large stock, and all for sale at the 

Very 

Smallest 
Margin 

Of Profit 

that an honorable firm can do business and live under. 

Their announcements are all strong ones, and will be 
fully believed by the public, while their modest invita- 
tion's to simply examine slock and prices before purchas- 
ing elsewhere, will undoubtedly be accepted by thousands 
of people. 



"A Sps® flf Bus©" la Womai r B Brats. 

Some one asserts that there is no offender 
whom society is so slow to forgive, as the 
person who assumes independence in dress. 
Jean Paul Richter, until a freak of fortune 
brought him sudden popularity, was con- 
sidered a man of immoral character, 
because he persisted in wearing his hair 
loose, though queues were in fashion, and 
dressed his neck low, notwithstanding that 
stiff high cravats were in vogue. Such 
was the acrimony which these audacities 
inspired, that an indignant clergyman 
refused him the loan of an expensive book, 
which the impecunious author was anxious 
to read, unless, in return, he would agree to 
adopt the conventional collar. 

Therefore, whatever our private opinions, 
we will propose no radical departure from 
ordinary usage. We will not even dwell 
upon the relation of woman's dress to her 
health, though we have just read solemn 
warnings against the prevailing modes, 
from the pen of one of the most eminent 
medical men of our land — warnings that 
might startle every woman. We will 
take it for granted that few women, even 
those most enslaved by fashion, do not 
sometimes, at least, in their secret souls, 
rebel at her unreasonable exactions, and 
wish themselves less weighted, hampered 
and restrained thereby. Of those whose 
necessity forced them out during the late 
inclement week, — an army of inglorious 
martyrs, who picked their devious way in 
snow, ice and sleet, or rain and mud, 
struggling with umbrellas and waterproofs 
to keep rebellious draperies intact, and 
expending a stock of patience that would 
have nobly served a better cause, — there 
must have been many who would be glad 
to know how the thing could be better 
managed. 

The dress-reform under-garments are 
now widely known and adopted, especially 
in the larger cities ; yet their excellencies 
still need to be brought to the attention of 
many, and some prejudices are to be over- 
come in conservative minds. Those prej- 
udices vanish when these garments are 
worn, and carefully adapted in fit and 
texture to each individual need. 



The suit, which may be made of any 
material, combines four garments in one. 
Some find it well to put over this a well- 
fitting basque of firm cotton, which takes 
the place of the corsets, and to which the 
skirts are buttoned. 

Only one skirt, and that very light, 
should be worn under the dress. The 
bands of the skirts should be made several 
inches larger than the person, and the 
skirts should be attached by eight buttons. 

This arrangement distributes the heat 
and weight of the under-clothing equally 
over the body. The weight of the swing- 
ing garments is borne by the shoulders, 
instead of the hips and back. All the 
garments are so loose about the waist as to 
leave the lungs free to expand to the fullest 
extent, and yet the skirts have no uncom- 
fortable sense of slipping, as when worn 
loosely on the hips. It is better that the 
petticoats be of stiff material, that it may 
not fall in at the feet in walking. The 
present light, wool-stuffed quilted skirts 
are good. Finally, the dress-skirt should 
never be heavy, if one would walk easily. 

Many a fashionable and elegantly-dressed 
lady now enjoys the comfort of this 
reformed costume, and yet makes no reve- 
lation of the fact, except by the greater 
elasticity and grace of her figure and 
movement. 

We must admit that she is not apt to be 
the woman who bangs her hair, or bangles 
her wrists, or totters on pointed heels, or 
screws a thin arm into a sleeve almost 
tighter than the skin itself, or commits 
herself to any other deformity. She sub- 
ordinates her apparel to her person, and 
thereby heightens its charms. 



The art of pottery has been quite neglect- 
ed by Americans until lately. To be sure, 
we have manufactured earthen vessels of 
divers kinds and descriptions, but in pot- 
tery, as an art, we have been deficient 
until very recently. Now, we are no 
longer open to the charge of neglecting 
this branch. Even the most common of 
household utensils come in for a share of 
the decorating process now so common, 
and by skilful hands the homeliest pieces of 



L A S E L L LEAVES 



clay are transformed into beautiful works 
of art. Angels, with Japanese pig-tails, 
dance, in company with Ethiopians, in 
gardens of rose-buds and palm-trees, in 
never-ending circles round ginger-jars, 
beer-bottles, vases and tea-chests. 

Those who cannot paint the beautiful 
vines and fig-trees used to ornament these 
articles, buy a few cents' worth of house- 
paint, and after covering the jars with a 
copious coat of this, stick these pretty 
images over the surface in endless variety. 

Who says we are not advancing in art, 
when we can, in one day, paint so won- 
derful a work, in which birds sing in lions' 
dens, and flowers blossom on eagles' wings, 
etc.? 

Every one has the fever, and until it 
reaches its height there is no help for the 
sufferers. It matters not that the majority 
of the people are entirely ignorant of the 
use of half the articles they buy. We 
noticed an item in a daily paper the other 
day something like this : " Maria, aren't 
those pottery things lovely ? " " Yes," was 
the answer ; ''but what are they all for? " 
The parlors of the fashionable are filled 
with all kinds of jars, so that you would 
imagine yourself in a crockery-shop, sooner 
than in a lady's parlor. 

As you enter the room some mammoth 
vessel, in imitation of the antique, copied 
from Mme. de Skilful by Mme. de Copy- 
ist, confronts you. A ginger-jar reposes 
on a stand ; the mantel, brackets, tables, 
and all conceivable places, are filled with 
bits of rare value and questionable beauty. 
Fashion has decreed that they be called 
beautiful, and so we must admire them, 
since "it is better to be out of the world, 
than to be out of the fashion." Therefore, 
we will devote our time to the ornamenta- 
tion of all sorts of earthen vessels, that 
high art may advance in our country. 



fl. 

From the Literary World. 
Beside that milestone where the level sun, 

Nigh unto setting, sheds his last, low rays 
On word and work irrevocably done, — 
Life's blending threads of good and ill outspun, — 

I hear, O friends! your words of cheer and 
praise, 
Half doubtful if myself or otherwise, 

Like him who, in the old Arabian joke, 

A beggar slept, and crowned caliph woke. 
Thanks not the less. With not unglad surprise 
I see my life-work through your partial eyes; 
Assured, in giving to my home-taught songs 
A higher value than of right belongs, 
You do but read between the written lines 
The finer grace of unfulfilled designs. 

J. G. W. 



Ths M,mmm of 3@v@?&l Stoaei. 

A December evening — the evening of my 
birth day — I sat before the grate, admiring 
the brilliant flashes of color struck by the 
fire-light from the stones of a beautiful 
ring which I had that day received. 

The central stone, a remarkably fine ruby, 
was surrounded by diamonds so very 
small that their presence was recognized 
only by the fine, bright radiance shed by 
them about the larger stone. This latter 
seemed a peculiarly appropriate selection, 
as I thought, of the ancient custom of 
choosing on such an occasion the stone 
corresponding to the month in which the 
day occurs ; according to the amulet made 
of twelve sacred stones, each consecrated 
to one of the signs of the zodiac. These 
stones were supposed to exert a benign 
influence during the month when the cor. 
responding constellations were above the 
horizon. Hence, my pleasure at the selec- 
tion of the ruby, which is assigned to 
December. 

Some one has imagined this amulet to be 
connected with the twelve stones in the 
breast-plate of the Jewish High Priest. 

Musing on this and other circumstances 
connected with both the ruby and its 
bright guardians, I wondered whence it 
came, preferring to imagine that it first saw 
the light on the bank of a streamlet of Ava ; 
that it was taken from its native sands by 
a swarthy Burmese, to later adorn the hand 
of his paler sister. 

The thought comes to me of the ruby 
necklace found by Launcelot twined about 
that baby neck, and won by Tristram for 
fair Queen Isolt. 

Then turning from the ruby joust to 
that other, where Launcelot, wearing the 
pearl-embroidered sleeve of fair Elaine, 
won for Guineveve the last of the nine 
diamonds which Arthur found in the crown 
of the murdered king, I see them flashing 
brightly through the air, and mingling their 
sparkle with the gleam of the blue water as 
they touch the surface before sinking for- 
ever into the darkness to which the beauti- 
ful queen, in jealousy of the "lily maid of 
Astolat," consigned them. 

But passing from the diamonds of 
romance, I see before me a very galaxy of 
historical gems, and foremost stands the 
Koh-i-noor, the "Mountain of Light," which, 
according to the Hindoo legend, has seen 
4JJ00 years. What romances, stranger than 
fiction, it could tell of the wonderful events 
of that brilliant career — of its life among 
the jewels of Arungzebe. What thrilling 



tales of blood and warfare in the strife for 
its possession ! 

When Mohammed Shah was obliged by 
custom to exchange turbans with his con- 
queror, "in proof of his regard," he lost 
the Koh-i-noor, as it was one of the orna- 
ments of his turban. The lesson must 
have taught the unfortunate monarch to 
allow his light to shine in a less-elevated 
and conspicious position. 

When at last it reached England in its 
wanderings, it was re-cut and polished, the 
Duke of Wellington first placing it on the 
cutting-mill. It lost thereby one-third of 
its weight ; and I have noticed that some- 
times the re-cutting and polishing process 
(particularly the latter) affect similarly 
other cases less brilliant than the diamond. 
As the Orloff diamond flashes before me, 
I wish that it had power to speak, for 
surely it might relate even more than the 
Koh-i-noor, having had a better opportunity 
to see ; for it once served as eye to an idol 
in India, from which position it was stolen 
by a soldier, and passing through different 
hands, was secured by Russia, whose 
sceptre it now adorns. But, although it 
may not tell its stories, it has provided one 
in another way, for it was this stone which 
suggested to Wilkie Collins his famous 
novel "The Moonstone." 

When Jean Paul Richter said, "Dia- 
monds are not only dug, but worn by 
slaves," he might have added the partici- 
ple "swallowed;" the beautiful Savoy 
diamond was thus disposed of by the 
servant who was assassinated while carry- 
ing it from one of the Henry's to the Swiss 
Government. It was afterward found in 
his stomach, and now belongs to Russia, 
as do also the Polar Star and the wonderful 
Shah. 

But the stars of this galaxy are as nume- 
rous as are those of the Milky Way, and 
I should probably have been still musing 
on the incidents connected with them, had 
not at the moment that Brazil's beautiful 
Star of the South appeared on my mental 
horizon ; the object of these meditations 
dropped from my negligent fingers, and 
ringing sharply on the marble hearth, 
effectually aroused me to a consciousness 
of the nearly dead coals ; while the dark- 
ness which they left as a legacy, and my 
own chilled self, offered a practical illus- 
tration of the unsubstantial nature of 
dreams in general. 

Professor — "Is the intensity of gravity greater 
at the Poles, or at the Equator ? " Sophomore — 
"Yes sir." Prof.— "Which P " Sophomore— 
" It's greater." 



LA SELL LEA FES. 



3 



O du frohliche, O du selige, 
Gnadenbringende Weihnachtszeit ! 

"Welt ging verloren, 

Christ ist geboren — 
Freue, freue dich, O Christenheit ! 

O du wonnige, preiserfiillete, 
Allerheiligste Weihnachtszeit ! 
Du Freund der Kinder, 
Rotter der Sunder, 
Hilf mir jetzt und in Ewigkeit. 



On? Lm 

In our reminiscences of the past term, 
we do not forget the lectures which made 
the Wednesday evenings such welcome 
visitors. If the remaining lectures of the 
course are as interesting as those to which 
we have listened, we may indeed congratu- 
late ourselves on the pleasure in store 
for us. 

The first of the course was delivered by 
Dr. J. E. Latimer, on Republican Institu- 
tions; a subject specially appropriate at 
this time, when all Europe is excited over 
the conflict which will decide the fate of 
nations. The speaker described the growth 
of free governments from the earliest time 
to the present ; dwelling, in turn, on the 
republic of Athens, and the causes which 
led to its overthrow ; the rise and fall of 
Roman supremacy ; and the struggle of 
Switzerland for independence. Then, in 
eloquent language, he traced the progress 
of the modern spirit of liberty, which, 
awakened by the success of the American 
colonists, flew across the Atlantic, and 
stirred to scenes of bloodshed the down- 
trodden peasantry of France. Greece, 
never forgetful of Marathon and Thermop- 
ylae, rose next in rebellion, while Poland, 
Prussia and Austria, felt the shock. 

In '•closing, he referred to the struggle 
which resulted, only a few years ago, in 
the freedom of the black race. 



On the evening of October 3d, Miss 
Ursula Cushman favored us with a lecture 
on "Italian Art in the Early and Middle 
Ages." The lecturer traced the growth of 
early Christian art in the Catacombs and 
Roman temples, gave some account of the 
method of coloring in distemper, of fresco, 
and the discovery of the value of oil. The 
decline of Greek art under Roman bondage 
was touched upon, as well as its corruption 
at Byzantium. The ecclesiastical restraint 
under which it was kept was depicted, the 
growth of mosaic painting, and the violence 
of the iconoclasts under Leo X. The 



paper closed with a brief analysis of the 
genius of Fra Angelico, who is the type of 
the ecstatic school, and whose inspired 
energy and single-hearted devotion, how- 
ever faulty in execution, have resulted in 
a loftiness of conception and purity of 
feeling not surpassed by the later masters 
of art, Michael Angelo, Raphael, and Leon- 
ardo di Vinci. 



On the evening of November 21st, the 
chapel was filled with friends and neigh- 
bors, who came to share with the School 
the interesting lecture of Rev. Geo. F. Pen- 
tecost, on the subject, "What Answer ? " 

The speaker gave the ancient tabernacle, 
with its three courts, as an illustration of 
our being, which has three divisions : the 
sensual, the intellectual, and the spiritual. 
According to the apprehension of these 
divisions, character is formed, and people 
are divided into three classes, each of 
which draws around itself what we call a 
school. All these endeavor to answer the 
questions which meet them everywhere, — 
questions concerning God, the Universe, 
Conscience, Death, and the Hereafter. 

Philosophy takes us to a rope wet with 
the waters of truth, but at which we draw 
until weary, without getting anything to 
quench thirst. Science teaches us of 
things as they are, but eannot tell why 
they are so. The materialist says, "They 
are so — make the best of it ; " and it is the 
Bible only, which gives us answers that 
can comfort the seeker for truth. 

In the course of the lecture there were 
some very amusing hits on the scientific 
opinions of the day, those concerning pro- 
toplasm and evolution being especially 
enjoyed by the audience. 



On December 5, occurred the entertain- 
ing lecture of Mr. Stoddard, on " What I 
saw in Jerusalem," noticed at length in 
our December Number. 



lilkflal leites fml 

January 17, 1S7S. 

" The developing idea in .schools has found 
early recognition in that popular institution for 
young ladies, Lasell Seminary. The students 
are now to be taught how to make dresses as 
well as to construct formulas, calculate eclipses, 
and write essays ; and that is an accomplishment 
that young ladies who usually come from school 
are sadly deficient in. A dressmaker's class may 
be an original idea in a young ladies' school, but 
we do not see why it should be. The mistake of 
educators has been theory at the expense of 
practice, and the dressmaker's class seems to be 
a new departure in the right direction. Let 
other institutions follow suit." 



He went up to his room the other afternoon, 
and noticed that there was only one match 
remaining in the box. " Now, if that shouldn't 
burn to-night when I come in," soliloquized he, 
"what a fix I should be in." So he tried to see if 
it was a good one. It was. 

A lad reciting some poetry to his mother, 
gave, among other things, the "Burial of Sir 
John Moore." " What do you like best in the 
piece?" asked the mother. "Few and short 
were the prayers they said," was the boy's reply. 

" Yes, my son," said a fond parent to his 
attentive son, "the very hairs of our head 
are all numbered." "Huh!" exclaimed the 
youth, gazing inquiringly upon the baldness 
of the aged parent's head, " that's nothing." 

Scene— Physiology class-room ; Professor— 

" Miss M , give the number of teeth and 

their names." Student—" Really, Professor, I 
have them all at my tongue's end, but I can't 
give them." 

A little girl remarked to her mamma, on 
going to bed, " I am not afraid of the dark." 
"No, of course you are not," replied her mamma. 
" I was a little afraid once when I went into the 
pantry to get a tart." " What were you afraid 
of? " asked the mamma. "I was afraid I could 
not find the tarts." 

You can get a very good idea of " natural selec- 
tion " in its practical workings, by viewing a 
celery glass after it has been once around the 
table. — Burlington Hawkeye. 

We would like to inquire if it also illustrates 
" Survival of the fittest." 

" How much is your stick candy? " inquired a 
boy of a candy dealer. 

"Six sticks for five cents." 

" Six sticks fer five cents, eh ? Now lem me 
see. Six sticks fer five cents, five fer four cents, 
four fer three cents, three fer two cents, two fer 
one cent, one fer nothin'. I'll take one." And 
he held out his hand to the bewildered candy 
dealer. 

A traveling show man, exhibiting a pano- 
rama of Bible scenes, wishing to give a little 
variety to the performance, hired the best fid- 
dler in the town, to play appropriate selections 
during the exhibition. The effect can be imag- 
ined, when, just as the audience was viewing a 
pathetic picture of the Prodigal Son's return, the 
fiddle twanged out merrily, "Johnny comes 
marching home." 

A skeptical young collegian confronted an 
old Quaker with the statement that he did not 
believe in the Bible. Said the Quaker : "Does 
thee believe in France ?" "Yes, for though I 
have not seen it, I have seen others that have. 
Besides, there is plenty of corroborative proof 
that such a country does exist!" "Then thee 
will not believe anything thee or others have not 
seen ? " " No ; to be sure I won't." " Did thee 
ever see thy own brains? " " No." " Ever see 
anybody that did ? " " No." " Does thee be- 
lieve thee hast any ? " 



4 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



— BY THE — 



Lasell Publishing Association, 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

EDITOR, 
ANNIE H. WHITE, '78. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ALICE N. MAGOUN, '78. IDA S. LONGYEAR. 



PUBLISHER, 
S. LIZZIE EMERSON. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
CORA B. FLINT, ' 7 9- LILL1E R. POTTER, '8o. 

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Frank Wood, Printer, 352 Washington Street, Boston. 

We noticed among the items of a recent 
newspaper, mention of the fact that a pen- 
sion had lately been bestowed by the Eng- 
lish government upon a prominent man of 
letters. This is only one of frequent items 
of like import. Such is the custom of our 
cousins across the water, and has been, since 
the day when the petted author of the 
Faerie Queen received munificent donations 
from the public treasury at the hand of 
Elizabeth. 

Such is not our custom. We grant no 
pensions, however meritorious a literary life 
may have been. However lofty or pro- 
longed the flight of one who possesses the 
"vision and the faculty divine," we, as a 
government, say to him practically, that 
the vision and the faculty must be their 
own exceeding great reward. We bestow 
no estates upon favorite writers. We give 
no one the right to wear the title of Lau- 
reate, however worthy he may be of the 
laurel crown of pre-eminence. 

" Kepublics are ungrateful, it is said," 
was the language of one of our great states- 



men in a Fourth of July oration. We 
suppose he referred to what is said by our 
trans-marine cousins before named, when 
they happen to be in a criticising mood ; 
and probabty one of the prominent 
grounds upon which they base the unfavor- 
able judgment, is the fact that our govern- 
ment bestows no reward upon literary men. 

A thoughtless observer some thousands 
of miles nearer to us than our cousins, 
might be disposed to concur in the judg- 
ment, and to say that we, as a people, have 
no proper appreciation of the products of 
mental labor. 

No better illustration of the falsity of 
such a judgment, however, could there be, 
than the generous notices which have been 
given by all the newspapers in our land of 
the assembly which met on the evening of 
Dec. 17th, in Boston, in the parlors of the 
Brunswick, to do honor to an American poet 
who has just fulfilled his three score years 
and ten. Editors hastened to recount, not 
to literary circles, but to the people, what 
was said and sung on the glad occasion. 

The enthusiasm with which the public 
received news of the homage done to our 
Quaker poet; the reverential love with 
which it greeted the praises of the "silent, 
shy, peace-loving man," shows that we re- 
ward our poets with something better than 
lands and honors ; with something more 
enduring than silver and gold. Milton was 
content with "fit audience, though few." 
If to be read and admired is to have a name 
" familiar as household words," Whittle r 
has no occasion to be so modest as Milton, 
for his audience is not "few." He who 
has sung for so many years to the hearts 
of the people, now finds the answering 
chord in those hearts ; and the literary toil 
of years receives its reward in the deep 
and lasting love which the fruits of that 
toil have aroused for the man. If he be 
not able to count by thousands the result 
of his labors, — nay, if he live poor in the 
goods of this world, he yet lives rich in 
the affections of the people. 

What has been said of Whittier, is, in a 
perhaps less marked degree, true of others. 
Nowhere is there to be found a better op- 
portunity, we venture to say so good an 
opportunity, for an author to be heard and 
appreciated, as in our own country. Themes 
for song there ai-e, " deep almost as life," 
for this people, as exemplified in the in- 
stance we have given ; and he who seeks 
and finds them, finds also a ready and wide 
response. He who becomes a "bright, 
particular star," has no need to "dwell 
alone." If we can have but one, the pen- 



sion or the loving popular appreciation, 
commend us to the ingratitude of Repub- 
lics. 



The fall term of 1877 closed with the 
usual rehearsal by the pupils in music, 
under the direction of Prof. J. A. Hills and 
Prof. Harry Wheeler. The exercises of 
the evening opened with an instrumental 
solo, by Miss Bowen, followed by a song 
by Miss Magoun. The latter also executed 
a difficult Agitato upon the piano. The 
songs rendered by Misses Ferguson, Lins- 
cott, Tourjee and Miller, were well re- 
ceived, and the instrumental solos by 
Misses King and Ferguson, were very en- 
joyable. Misses Bacon and Pentecost 
rendered a duet upon the piano very cred- 
itably, and the programme closed with a 
difficult instrumental duet, by Miss King 
and Prof. Hills. 



On the evening of January 5th, Miss 
Frances E.Willard, of Chicago, favored " us 
girls " with one of her helpful, interesting 
talks. The subject chosen for this occasion 
was, "Who Wins?" and it was treated in 
a way to be understood and enjoyed by all. 

We could wish that this sweet counsellor 
might always be with us ; but we may only 
wish her "God-speed;" and the success 
she so justly deserves in the great work to 
which she is called. 



Dr. McKeown, in his recent lecture on 
"Orators and Oratory," stated that Edward 
Everett received $100,000 for his oration 
on " The Character of Washington."' We 
have a few orations on the same subject, 
which we are willing, in consideration of 
present hard times, to sell at rates some- 
what reduced from Mr. Everett's. In the 
same discourse, the lecturer gave us an- 
other bit of encouragement, by attributing 
the success of N. P. Banks and Henry 
Wilson to the literary societies in which 
they worked when young. 

Toil on, sisters of the S. D. ! Behold 
your road to Congress ! 



Died, at its residence, 8 Murray Street, 
New York, the Galaxy, at the tender age 
of twelve. Its health was not supposed to 
be in a precarious condition, so that the 
news of its unhappy end was as unexpec- 
ted as it was lamentable. We judge that 



LA SELL LEA V E S 



the event must have been sudden, also, to 
itself, from the fact that only a day before 
its decease took place, it was forming 
plans for the coming year, and even boast- 
ing of the brilliant success which was sure 
to crown its efforts. 

Its short life has been a comparatively 
happy and blameless one, and its prospects 
(according to its own story) were flatter- 
ing indeed. 

It leaves a large circle of friends to mourn 
Its loss ; but their grief is somewhat 
assuaged by the thought that, in accord- 
ance with the popular doctrine of Pythag- 
oras, its soul has not ceased to exist, but 
has only passed into another body, and 
that when the appointed period of its 
transmigrations shall be accomplished, they 
may, perhaps, see it return to them in its 
own welcome shape. 



Ml, lofyoks Hi© Laws. 

We cannot refrain from quoting a few 
of the laws of llolyoke, as given by a 
contemporary. 

We would suggest that Prof. B. be hired 
to deliver to the students of this worthy 
institution, his lecture on " Look on the 
Bright Side." 

4. Reading. — No young lady shall devote 
more than one hour of each day to miscella- 
neous reading. The Atlantic Monthly, Shakes- 
peare, Scott's works, and other immoral books, 
are strictly prohibited. The Missionary Herald, 
Doddrige's Rise and Progress, and Washington's 
Farewell Address, are earnestly recommended 
for light reading. 

6. Company. — No young lady is expected to 
have any gentlemen acquaintances, unless they 
are returned missionaries or agents of benevo- 
lent societies. Daguerreotypes and plaster-busts 
are also prohibited. "Thou shalt not worship 
any false images." 

9. No young lady shall spend more than three 
consecutive minutes at the mirror. 

10. Sabbath Rules. — No young lady who is 
a member of this school shall laugh or look out 
of the window on the Sabbath. 

Exercise.— Every member of this school shall 
walk at least a mile a day, unless a freshet, 
earthquake, or some other calamity prevent. The 
bounds to the north are marked by a stake ; also 
those to the south and west. If any lady shall 
go beyond said bounds, she shall scrub floors 
and wash dishes two weeks as a penalty. 



The bold project of tunnelling the Strait of 
Gibraltar is no longer a mere subject of discus- 
sion. Machines for the purpose are being pre- 
pared, and Spanish engineers are engaged in 
devising plans for the work. The estimated 
cost is $20,000,000. 

Some enterprising individual is publishing a 
sequel to Daniel Deronda, under the title of 
Gwendolen, or Reclaimed. Those who were 
discontented with the way in which George Eliot 
disposed of the beautiful Miss Harleth, may be 
able to obtain consolation in the pages of the 
forth-coming volume. 

AMUSEMENTS; 
PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

lO Somerset Street, Boston. 

The seventeenth year began September 18, 1S76. Cir- 
culars may be obtained by addressing W. N. EAYRS. 

Well, we had supposed from the number of 
''dull boys 1 ' about, that a boys' school must 
needs be a place of " all work and no play." 

From the above, copied from a Boston paper, 
we infer that a change of programme is con- 
templated, and that hereafter a boy's school 
is to be all play and no work. 

Success to them! A change certainly was de- 
sirable. 

We would thank The Boston Post for its 
recent kind notice of the literary efforts of the 
girls at Lasell. There is some good judge of 
things in that office .' 

Proe. Ciieny, one of the earlier teachers of 
music in Lasell Seminary, made us a call a few 
mornings ago, and gave us some pleasant remi- 
niscences of former days. here. 

The "Classical English Reader," prepared by 
Mr. Hudson, well deserves the hearty commen- 
dations bestowed upon it by the press. After 
the staleness of conventional school readers, it 
is refreshing to examine this unique collection 
of classic gems, which cannot fail to create in 
the pupil a taste for good literature. 

Proe. B. would remind old scholars of their 
solemn promise in regard to the yearly letter. 



SCese mi fhere. 

An exchange announces that the thermometer 
has at last got down to where hand-organs 
freeze up. 

The Seniors are congratulating themselves 
that they are through with logic, though mental 
philosophy bids fair to take its place. They 
have not heard for some time, however, that 
" all men are mortal," etc. 

Those who remained at Lasell during Christ- 
mas vacation, were greatly indebted to Prof. 
Bragdon for his kind efforts to make the time 
pass pleasantly, and to ward off those longings 
for home which are so apt to rise at such a sea- 
son. Their thanks would perhaps be best ex- 
pressed, by saying that those efforts were com- 
pletely successful. 



We are sorry to miss the face of Miss King 
this term ; all regret that she could not return 
to us. 

The "S. D." Society is flourishing like a 
green-bay tree. It now rejoices in twenty-two 
members. 

The mineralogical cabinet has recently re- 
ceived a noticeable addition in the form of some 
beautiful branches of pink coral, the gift of 
Prof. Dole. 

A distinguished Japanese traveler in this 
country writes home : " The chief branch of edu- 
cation of young men here is rowing. The people 
have large boat-houses called ' colleges.' and the 
principal of these are Yale and Harvard." 

Soph, quotes: "The possession of riches in- 
volves great responsibility ; " and adds: "Send 
along the riches ; we'll take the responsibility." 

M. Ernest Reynek, the music critic of Les 
Debats, says: "I am always pleased when I see 
a young lady devote herself to the study of the 
harp or violoncello. It is one less to play the 
piano." 

A Chinese professorship has been founded at 
Yale, and instruction in the "language celes- 
tial" is also soon to be a feature of Harvard. 

The Juniors begin already to wear expressions 
indicating intense mental distress, and any allu- 
sion to the month of March produces a heart- 
rending effect. 

The meeting of the Newton Horticultural 
Society, was held in the Seminary Chapel, on the 
evening of the 17th. The exercises were ex- 
ceedingly interesting, and were fully appi-eciated 
by the "young women" of Lasell, if we may judge 
by the enthusiastic applause which proceeded 
from their part of the house at every possible 
opportunity. Their enjoyment was by no means 
diminished by the fine collation served at the 
conclusion of the literary feast. 

The first sociable of the term, held on the 
evening of the 19th, was a decided success. The 
hostesses were Misses Mehlbach, Bacon. Bailey, 
Bowen, Bragdon and Brooke; and thanks are 
due to them for the enjoyable entertainment 
provided for the guests. 

"To help young women to gain strength, is the 
great purpose of the work at Lasell." That is 
what the circular says, and then it goes on to 
show that the need of the times calls for a more 
practical education than most girls receive. As 
a move in this direction, our faculty propose to 
give us an opportunity to learn dressmaking 
under the most favorable circumstances. This 
is, indeed, a rare chance for all who desire to 
learn the handicraft. We are also much pleased 
at the promise of instruction in telegraphy and 
short-hand writing, in time to come. 

" Can you tell me where the wicked boys go 
who fish on Sunday?" asked a sober-looking 
gentleman of a little chap who had worms and 
a rod. "Yes; some of 'em goes to the river, 
and them as is very wicked goes to the lake. 
I'll show you the best place at the lake." 



6 



LASELL LEAVES, 



lis 



llfl 



EMtma, 



We are glad to call the attention of our read- 
ers to the advertisement of John H. Pray, Sons 
& Co. (on first page). The name of this friend 
of floors is too well known to need our further 
notice. 

The lovers of music who peruse our paper, 
will be pleased to find among our advertisements 
that of Henry F. Miller. 

The dress-reform movement mentioned in the 
present number, owes much of its success to 
the efforts of Mrs. Read, whose advertisement 
was found in our Christmas number. 

We invite the gentlemen readers of our 
Leaves to patronize the tailoring establishment 
of Mr. C. A. T. Bloom, whose advertisement is 
offered in our columns. We have a daily con- 
sciousness of his good work. A word to the 
wise is sufficient. 

One of the best places for choice butter, at 
the lowest prices, is at Fred. H. Thomas'. (See 
advertisement.) 

Don't we wish we were all going to Europe 
next summer. 

All persons interested in the subject of blinds, 
mantels, or shelves, call at Densmore & JBrack- 
ett's. (See advertisement.) By the way, Mr. 
Densmore, can't you induce Prof. B. to put a 
marble mantel in each of our rooms? Don't 
think now of another thing we'd want — for a 
week! 

Thomas Hall (see advertisement) is going 
to furnish us some telegraphic instruments 
pretty soon. 



Some people are too careful about wounding 
the feelings of other people. We know a man 
who cannot sleep nights, so great is his fear that 
he may unwittingly pass a counterfeit bill on a 
printer; and that big-hearted man has guarded 
against such a mishap by reading this paper for 
years without offering to pay for it. Such rare 
tenderness renews our confidence in human 
nature. — Borne Sentinel. 



THOMAS S. COOS, 

AGENT FOR THE 

^w Jptflkul fat €uum €<r« 

—AND— 

CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



A classical Soph translates "Nubes est niger" 
"The nigger from Nubia." — Ex. 

Prof. — " What important change came over 
Burns in the latter part of his life?" 
Student. — " He died." — Ex. 

Here is another one of those delightful facts 
of science : Feeling is a much slower sense than 
sight. If a man had an arm long enough to 
reach the sun, and were to touch that body 
with the tip of his fingers, he would never find 
out whether it were hot or cold, as he would be 
dead before the sensation arrived at head-quar- 
ters, which would require one hundred years. 

There is a courtesy of the heart. It is ap- 
plied to love. From it springs the purest cour- 
tesy in the outward behavior. — Goethe. 

A man's first wonder when he begins to 
preach is that people do not come to hear him. 
After awhile, if he is good for anything, he 
begins to wonder that they do. — Rev. Phillips 
Brooks. 




Oriental Tea Co. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Retail Sealers in 



TEA 



And Roasters and Dealers In 



9 



COFFEE. 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 




"Public Benefactors." 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 
very Reasonable Hates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 



Those of our readers whose memories extend 
back some thirty years, will readily recognize the 
change which has taken place in the retail gro- 
cery business during that time. The old regime 
has not passed entirely away, but great improve - 
.ments have been made. Formerly, cleanliness 
was a virtue not recognized in a grocery store. 
The store was the common loafing-place of the 
smokers and drinkers, and the rendezvous 
of the politicians. The floor was an inch deep 
with filth. Goods were piled up in the greatest 
confusion, regardless of convenience or display. 
Such a thing as prices plainly marked was un- 
known. The dealer used his discretion when 
asked the price of his goods, his motto being, 
" Small sales and large profits." The old-estab- 
lished and well-known firm of C. D. Cobb & 
Bros., whose name is a talisman with all house- 
keepers in every town in New England, were 
the pioneers in bringing about the change which 
has taken place in the conduct of the trade. 
Commencing business thirty-two years ago, on 
Cambridge Street, Boston, they began with mak- 
ing their store a model of neatness and attrac- 
tiveness. Believing in the " one-price system," 
they marked their goods in plain figures, with a 
small margin of profit, believing that they should 
find their account in the great increase in the 
quantity of goods handled. They used the great- 
est care in the selection of their goods, and, as 
they always purchased for cash, had the advan- 
tage in price over those who bought on credit. 
This system they have adhered to ever since. 
Others, seeing the advantage of their system, 
were not slow in imitating their example; 
everywhere grocery stores became neater, prices 
were plainly marked, and, what is more to the 
benefit of the purchasing public, were reduced to 
reasonable figures. Of course the Cobb Bros, 
were maligned and execrated by the dealers, 
yet they could do nothing but follow their exam- 
ple; and then the firm of C. D. Cobb & Bros, 
became entitled to the name of "The Poor 
Man's Friend." 

The headquarters of the firm is at 722, 726 and 728 
Washington Street. This is the largest •wholesale and 
retail grocery house in New England, if not in the whole 
country. From here they supply their branch stores in 
various parts of the city, and in Westboro and Fitchburg, 
and from these stores combined, they distributed last year 
nearly $1,500,000 worth of groceries. The firm use 
twenty-live single and double teams in their business, and 
employ seventy-five men in their different stores. To 
illustrate the immense quantities of goods they are 
obliged to handle, it may be noted that they ordered at 
two different times 6 tons of ground spices. Their facili- 
ties for purchasing goods are equal, if not superior, to 
any house in the trade. They always buy for cash, and 
so obtain their goods at the lowest margin of profit to the 
producer or manufacturer. Then it will be seen at a 
glance why the Cobb Bros, can offer their goods at retail 
lower than any other concern in Boston. Other dealers 
attempt to account for it to their customers by saying 
that the quality of the goods is inferior, but a single 
trial is enough to prove the falsity of this charge; and 
there are thousands of families throughout the New Eng- 
land States, many of whom have been their patrons for 
the last quarter of a century, who will readily testify they 
can get more goods for their money by buying of *C. L>. 
Cobb & Bros., than at any other place. In the article of 
tea, for instance, it is well known that the public is very 
fastidious, and will detect a poor article at the first trial. 
Yet C. D. Cobb & Bros, probably handle a larger quantity 
of teas than any other concern in the city, and at lower 
prices. They are equally careful in the selection of all their 
goods, for they are aware that nothing would injure their 
well-earned reputation quicker than the selliug of an in- 
ferior class of goods. So valuable has the name of C. D. 
Cobb & Bros, become in the grocery trade, that other 
concerns have attempted to build up a trade with the use 
of it. The firm have been offered large sums for the use 
of their name alone in distant towns and other States. 
But the public should remember that the original C. D. 
Cobb & Bros.' Principal Warehouse is at 722, 726 and 728 
Washington Street, Boston, with branches as named below. 
People often enter these rival stores under the impression 
that they are dealing with the original C. D. Cobb & Bros. ; 
but a little experience, and, we trust, the intelligence we 
have given, will prevent their longer being deceived by 
any false pretences. Do not forget that the genuine C. D. 
Cobb & Bros., can be found at the following places: 
Principal Warehouse, 722, 726 and 728 Washington Street; 
with branch stores, 140 Hanover Street, corner Union; 
1311 and 1313 Washington Street; 2235 Washington Street, 
corner Main and Milk Streets, Westboro, Mass. ; 145 and 
147 Main Street, Fitchburg, Mass.— Extract from Boston 
Daily Globe. * 



L A SEE L L E A VE S. 



7 



DBHSHORB <Sk I140Ilff, ; 



Successors to John Hall, 



Wholesale & Retail Dealers in 



DOORS, 



SASHES, 



BLINDS, 




MARBLEX2ED SLATE 



MANTELS, 



AND SHELVES. 



177 and 183 BLACKSTONE STREET, 

(Near Haymarket Sq.,) 
C. D. Dcnsmore. ]Q Q GJ "J" Q pjT _ C. K. Brackett. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



R 



JAMES VICKERS, 

ESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

4®~ All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 
DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

jr .a. hvl is s "v i o ik: :e:fl s , 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 

L A. ELLIOT k COMPANY, 

(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes,) 
Importers and Dealers In 

w,njpufa|$ t ^J ; hvomo|, IJhofoigrapIis, 

Studies, and other Works of Art, 

At Wholesale and Retail. 
Picture Frames Made to Order, 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings, 

J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 

DEALER IN 

FANCY S0OB 

NOTIONS, TRIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEAVTON LOWER FALLS.] 

Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 

Orocktry, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Meal 8c Grain, Wholesale & Retail. 

AgencyforMme. Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



9 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

CHILDS, FULLER & CO., 

Wholesale & Eetail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, LAMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &c, 

Agents for Perkins & House's Safety Lamps. 
No. 680 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

J~. Kll>TO"VSrX_.E!S cfc SONS, 

Wholesale and lietail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Qnahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON, MASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G-. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

F1UIT MB ¥IG!TABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 
Cellar No. 1, New Faneuil Hall Market, Boston 

ALiFRED IB ZE\ XT S lEI, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale, 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No, 9 Boylston Market, Boston. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Eetail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P, 0. Address, Auburndale. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



h <$ 



kl 



FASHIONABLE 37 West Street, 



STATIONERS, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Envelopes are 
elegant and inexpensive. 




jLrtist pitatagrapher, 



Has Removed to 



493 WASHINGTON ST., 



Up one flight, between Temple Place and West Street, 
where, in his elegant rooms and with increased facilities, 
he wUl be enabled to guarantee perfect satisfaction, at 
the lowest prices. 



[Established 1847.] 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON. 

) ~A <vA Jjj. 

jtationers and iuanlt look i anufaciurerc 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAY. 

FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 




■I 



tilt) 



4&lvi 



Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 

BOSTON. 



8 



L A S E L L LEA V E S, 



Grand Educational Excursion 



To Europe, in the summer of 1S7S, visiting Ireland 
Scotland, England, France, Belgium, the Rhine, Prussia 
Switzerland, Italy, and the Paris Exposition. 

All objectionable features incident to European travel 
Entikely Removed. 

Return Tickets good twelve months. 

College Professors, Teachers of Music and Literature, 
Aft Students, School Teachers, and others of like tastes 
please address, for prospectus, 

E. TOURJEE, 

Music Hall, B ston, 

Notinan & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Ceiiteainal). 1876. 



\|/bm pit0fagrapl|jqs* 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PHOVISIOU STORE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fuesh Vegetables in their season. 

4Kg=* Goods delivered free of charge. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AT WHOLESALE AJfD RETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Painter/ $up-plie£, SftW Material^, 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



SWAN <Sc NKWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. Wrt<BTrtm 

S. B. NEWTON. BOSTON. 

HENRY F. MILLER, 

FIAIO-VDBTI 14] 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

Bft@CCTQ)ISi, MASS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AT THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

WATERS & IN MAN, 

"WEST IISTZEWTOISI ^A.IS3rrJ> .A- XX BTJR KT ID .A.nL.33, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FFtikKTK WOOD, 

STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 

Nearly oppose Bromfield Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

JOSEPH "W. GrIER-IG-Or, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in Enameled Slate 

MitJTLES. AMD BRACKET SHELVES, Em 

Also, KiBglisn Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Paper.-, Tarlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Jiromfielcl 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers cf "The Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON, 

JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 
Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New P. H, Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston, 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

NICHOLS cfc ZEaZ^-T-iX-i, 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 

W. H. IPttKSrCII <Sc CO. 
Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JODSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

EEPAIEINQ PE0MPTL7 ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



L0CKW00D, BROOKS & CO., 
publishers, jnooliseller^ and Stationery 

381 Washington St., Boston. 
Dealers in all kinds of 

SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, 

And Books in every department of Literature. Plain 
and Fancy Stationery in the greatest variety. Artistic 
Designing and Engraving a specialty. Pine Printing 
executed in the best style. 

4®= Correspondence solicited, .gjjr 

THOMAS HALL, 

MANUFACTURING ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 

Telegraphical, Philosophical, Mathematical. Optical, 

Galvanic, and Chemical Instruments 

of all Descriptions . 

Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels, 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. Sw Hal''* II lustra twl Trlinraiili 'aliilognt. 



^ ttWm R T IS E R S 




Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing- an estimate from the undersigned 
^/\ before closing their contracts. 

FOR 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisinr 
rates, &c.« 

ADDRESS, 



IC.EOTS,252Mshin<^nSt;&)ston 



From Paine's Illustrated Price-List. 




No. 5. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide, 
French Burl Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 

No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY, 

Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 

No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Uanal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





TDTJJSL ^ZElVLIISr^- PACTI." 



Volume III 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., FEBRUARY, 1878. 



Number 5. 



Confidence is a plant of slow growth, whether it is 
shown in business, politics or religion. Men will support 
other men financially or politically, if they have confi- 
dence in their integrity and industry. The public gener- 
ally will uphold those men in whom they have confidence, 
and they will patronize those firms in bxisiness whose 
word has never been questioned or proved unworthy. 
Never in the whole history of our Country, have we felt 
the need of confidence more in business. 

The reckless methods of doing business, induced by the 
war-times and the financial insecurity of the past four 
years, have made us cautious and slow to place our trust 
m anything or anybody. It seems, then, that the public 
should know who to buy of and what firms are reliable. 

Among the firms in Boston who have the entire 
confidence of the community, 

Messrs. John H. Pray, Sons & Co., 

OF 

558 and 560 Washington St. 

the well-known carpet dealers, stand high upon the list. 

Since 1817, father and sons have dealt with the people 
in their line of goods, and they have established a repu- 
tation which many old Boston firms fully appreciate, and 
which the younger ones may well strive to secure. 

The permanent and profitable success they have 
achieved is a gratifying example of the result of fair and 
honorable dealing. The fact that they have not a large 
building with modern conveniences at an exorbitant 
rent, allows them to sell goods at a very reasonable profit, 
though, as the public are aware, they have abundant 
facilities for transacting the immense business their 
books annually record. As usual, they are now making 
extensive preparations for the 

SPRING TRADE 

OF 

1 :8' % ;8 '-.. 

Of all the usual grades of high and low-priced 

Carpetings, 
Mattings, 
Oil Cloths, 
&c, &c, 

they have a large stock, and all for sale at the 

Very 

Smallest 
Margin 

Of Profit 

that an honorable firm can do business and live under. 

Their announcements are all strong ones, and will be 
fully believed by the public, while their modest invita- 
tions to simply examine stock and prices before purchas- 
ing elsewhere, will undoubtedly be accepted by thousands 
of people. 



II 



IV 



(Trifles captivate weak minds.) 

Addison makes this a text for an essay on 
the pursuit of show, and the tendency of 
women to such frivolity. I take it as the 
text for a homily on the influence of the 
kind of entertainments which have of late 
attracted such crowds in our modern 
Athens. They might raise a doubt as to 
her claim to the high title she has re- 
ceived. Boston, the city of intellectual 
culture, of high eminence in all branches 
of art, of moral purity — Boston, of all 
cities of the United States, runs wild over 
dog, cat, and baby-shows. 

What good purpose can the prospectus 
of these entertainments show us ? 

I have great respect for the canine race, 
but still must ask, what end can it serve 
(except the filling 1 of empty pockets) to 
bring together hundreds of dogs of all 
species, to make the air hideous with their 
howling ? I have no antipathy against 
babies ; I even can say with the poet, 
"What would the world be without the 
babies?" Still, 1 can see no end accomplished 
in bringing together a crowd of babies, 
mostly noticeable for some peculiarity or 
deformity. Even the dog-show does not j 
seem such a departure from good taste. 

The cat-show is noticeable because of its 
absurdity — cats without tails ; cats without 
eyes; cats of as many varieties as were the 
rats in Hamlin town. Now I am aware that 
the cat is not to be despised ; indeed, I am 
rather fond of cats. I have read that Pe- 
trarch had his favorite stuffed and placed in 
his study, after its death, and that even the 
learned Dr. Johnson delighted to take home 
oysters to his cat. With such allies on the 
side of the feline race, I should not feel at 
liberty to take the offensive. 

The place in which two of these enter- 
tainments were held, must seem to all 
lovers of art, the great evil connected with 
them. 

Oh, sacred to Apollo and the Muses 1 I 
shall attempt no puns on " mewsic " and 
the " Thomas orchestra." 

The baby-show was held in a more ap- 
propriate place, since the infants there ex- 



hibited were doubtless " flowers of the 
family." 

After this, the question arises, What 
next ? Since the gift of divination is de- 
nied us, we change the question, and ask, 
Whither does all this tend ? What is the 
influence upon the public mind ? The hall 
which was nearly empty a year ago, when 
the gifted Essipoff enchanted all who came 
within her magic spell, is crowded by 
groups of eager sight-seekers, on such occa- 
sions as these. 

We consider ourselves far in advance of 
those people who attend bull and dog-fights ; 
but there may be some question whether 
this difference arises from our superior in- 
telligence, or from custom. It seems to 
some of us that a little more of the Puritan 
idea in regard to amusements, would not 
hurt liberal Boston. Certainly, the cultiva- 
tion of a taste for those spoken of, will not 
improve society. 



for Sard Times, 

In these times of financial embarrassment 
and trouble, times which seem to be tem- 
pered to an extra degree of hardness, — when 
the "lords of creation" are constantly 
advocating economy in the household, and 
" cut down your expenses," is the cry 
which comes wafted on every breeze ; when 
the sky, in sympathy, seems to have put on 
a deeper shade of blue, and men go about 
the streets with long and sober faces, 
anxiously asking if some way out of this 
trouble cannot be devised, and no one is 
found to prescribe an antidote ; it seems 
to us, it is high time to make a change in 
the government, and allow us women to 
have a hand in the management of the 
affairs of the nation. For more than a 
century have men conducted the affairs of 
this country according to their own ideas. 
What have they done ? Of course there are 
some bright spots in the past, to which 
they point with pride ; but what of that ? 
We are all liable to blunders, and we ought 
to be willing to give man the credit for all 
the good he may have done through mis- 
take. We readily grant it to him, but 
would ask him to remember those dark 



LASELL LEAVES. 



clouds of the past, when the country waded 
through seas of blood and sorrow. 

Man, through mistake, has brought these 
"hard times" upon us, and we are now 
wandering hopelessly about, seeking some 
way of escape. I admit that this is no 
time for fun ; for when friend meets friend, 
and asks him to lend him a dollar, and we 
behold him turn away his head, and with 
Spartan firmness force back the tears, while 
he sobs in the language of Simple Simon, 
" I have not any," it would certainly be a 
hard heart that could laugh at his misfor- 
tune. We women, say that there is a way 
out of all this trouble. Give us the reins 
of government, and these dark clouds will 
give way, and peace and plenty shall again 
reign. It seems to us, no time could be 
more propitious than the present for such a 
change, for men of all parties are in doubt 
as to the one legally elected President ; and 
in this unsettled state of matters, it would 
be well for Mr. Hayes to retire from the 
White House, and allow Mrs. Hayes to 
rule for the balance of the term. There 
will be found some men weak enough to 
laugh at this proposition, and say that we 
should first learn to govern ourselves ; but 
they must be ignorant of history, which is 
full of instances where women have so ruled 
men that they have obeyed their requests 
with the greatest alacrity ; and we would 
refer to the " Caudle Lectures," suggesting 
to these men that it would be well to study 
them carefully, so learning to escape the 
sorrow that comes from disobedience. 
Men often remind us that we were designed 
by our Creator to be inferior to themselves ; 
but they should bear in mind, that every 
step in the creation, from matter to man, 
was in the ascending scale, and that woman 
was created after man. 

Perhaps some one will ask, what we 
would do if the power were granted us ? 

We would commence at the seat of gov- 
ernment, and send home to till the soil, 
those swarms of drones who are drinking 
the life-blood of the nations ; we would 
dissolve the present Congress, and fill 
their places with forty-two women •' for we 
are told that one woman can say as many 
words in a given time as ten men, and 
talk seems to be all there is to do in Con- 
gress ; but we do not think it would take 
us four months to find out whether we 
wanted a silver dollar, worth ninety cents, 
in exchange for a gold one, worth one hun- 
dred cents. 

Another useless appendage to the pres- 
ent Congress, that we should be obliged 
to dispense with, is the door-keeper, — for 



we women are taught to open the door, and 
always to close it after us. So we might 
goon, cutting "off heads," and reducing 
expenses, until the government was con- 
ducted as prudently as a well-ordered 
household, and money would begin to flow 
into the pockets of all, to bring joy and 
happiness to the whole country. But we 
do not intend to stop here. We would go 
into every city, town, and village of the 
land, with all the force of the law, and 
would compel those engaged in the baneful 
traffic of liquor to cease their practice, so 
that in one month, not a place in the land 
should be left where that which *kills soul 
and body could be bought. Of course, we 
would not disfranchise the men. We 
would allow them to vote, so long as they 
voted right, and make use of them in 
sweeping, building fires, and such manual 
employments. 

Is there one man who disbelieves we 
could and would do all this ? Give us the 
chance to try. . 



Not the midnight concert from cantank- 
erous felines in the back-yard, nor the 
howling canines who drive sleep from 
weary lids at the small hours ; nor is it the 
pestilence of the small boy, in its varied 
forms and aggravations. Neither do I al- 
lude to the man who puffs his cigar-smoke in 
your eyes, or leaves pools of tobacco juice 
whenever he sits in the cars. It is no 
brute whatsoever, or "horrid man," of 
whom I speak. It was lovely woman her- 
self, in this case, who stooped to folly, and 
made, as I have said, a nuisance of herself. 
This particular instance occurred in the 
Lowell Institute, in Boston, early this sea- 
son, at one of the lectures. Attractive as 
this course was, I had sometimes wondered 
how many of the crowd came really to hear. 
A little observation showed other motives. 
— certain young men and women, even, 
merely seeking each other's society. They 
laughed and talked slyly, when they could 
get a chance. One young girl made crude 
sketches of faces around her. Many came 
because the lectures were fashionable, and 
to say they had heard them. They listened 
fitfully. Some had nothing else to do, and 
desired variety. My lady came to get 
rid of herself; but she didn't succeed. 

When I came in late, I was about to take 
the only unoccupied seat I saw — one be- 
side her. She objected, — she was reserv- 
ing it for a friend, whose coming she 
awaited with conspicuous demonstrations 



of eagerness. Not wishing to assert my 
right to the place, I waited till after the 
lecture began, when some one kindly spoke • 
to her in my behalf, and her friend not ap- 
pearing, she made room for me, a little re- 
luctantly. I found her a restless neighbor, 
who seemed to court notice. She fidget- 
ed in every direction, and was never still. 
She took off her many-buttoned gloves ; 
arranged her numerous bangles ; changed 
herrings from one fingerto another ; exam- 
ined her watch ; stroked her crimps ; settled 
her hat ; picked out her bows ; unbuttoned 
her cloak, and then buttoned it again ; 
fanned herself a while ; buttoned on each 
glove laboriously, and then pulled off the 
right one ; giggled without apparent cause ; 
talked with her next neighbor about what 
"he says, and she says ;" then disengaged 
a pretty gold pencil from the various pen- 
dants of her watch-chain, and wrote on the 
fly-leaves of a book from the Public Library, 
which she held in her hand. You would 
have thought by her important manner 
and elaborate preparation, that she was 
writing down some weighty notes ; but 
I accidentally caught sight of the words, 
"old gold and white satin." As I am prov- 
ing, she had the power to distract my 
attention from the lecturer, charming as he 
was. Her little vanities were a constant 
study, and her want of repose was conta- 
gious. In marked contrast was the modest 
face of a school girl near by, who lis- 
tened with unconscious and rapt attention. 
Though a grown woman of apparently 
good social rank, was she not, my neigh- 
bor, in her small way, and for the time, a 
"public nuisance " ? 



It is not growing like a tree 

In bulk, doth make man better be; 

Or standing long, an oak, three hundred year, 

To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere ; 

A lily of a day 

Is fairer far in May, 
Although it fall and die that night — 
It was the plant and flower of Light. 
In small proportions we just beauties see, 
And in short measures life may perfect be. 

Ben. Jonson. 



"DES ENIGMAS." 

Dont on va donner la solution dans les 
"Leaves" suivantes, s'il est desire. 

"Je b is a vo re 1 " 

"Je suis le capitain de vingt-cinq sol- 
dats, et sans moi Paris serait pris ! " 



L A S E L L LEAVES, 



mmm 



'> P. 



m 



A book with this title has recently been 
sent to the editorial rooms. It is a very 
amusing and interesting narrative of the ad- 
ventures and perilous experiences of the 
pioneer girls of Michigan's University, at 
Ann Arbor, the third greatest college of our 
country, and in some respects at the head, 
having adopted a number of customs di- 
rectly from the great German colleges, 
which have not yet been introduced at 
Harvard and Yale ; and, what is most in- 
teresting to us girls, is the greatest and 
largest institution in the world that is open 
to women. Commencing with the dozen that 
this book tells of, there are even more than 
a hundred, and every year brings more. 

The story describes their struggle with 
popular opinion, and the prejudices that 
generally prevailed against the admission 
of women into these institutions. But their 
ultimate success, and the constantly-in- 
creasing number of our much-abused sex 
who yearly step Ann Arbor-ward, proves 
the venture to have been a wise and con- 
sistent one. 

The heroine is, to us, a most interesting 
example of womanly independence and 
dignified piquancy. Her views on the 
slang question may be interesting to those 
who have not an opportunity to read the 
book. She says : " I think that a judicious 
use of slang is very effective, and I intend, 
from time to time, to transplant some of the 
choicest of the boy's phrases into my own ; 
it is greatly superior to girl's slang. Why, 
one of my girl friends went to Vassar, and 
came home full of such as " I'm dying to 
know it ;" I'm furious to see him ;" and the 
most trifling things were horrible, or splen- 
did, or gorgeous ; and every other sentence 
began with ' I vow ! ' And if you don't see 
that boy's slang is superior to that use of 
English, I don't admire your taste. For 
instance: ' cheese it/ 'that squelches me/ 
' I'm smashed on her/ ' off on your ear/ or 
1 that's cheeky/ — jewels, every one of them, 
' five words long, that sparkle upon the out- 
stretched forefinger of all time forever/ 
Then when you add to these the many invo- 
cations of the Olympian Zeus, and other 
classic oaths, you have, at once, a diction 
elegant and imposing/' 

The only objection we have to offer, is 
the introduction of the lover ; for, although 
in the first part, Miss " Will," says, " I tell 
you, nothing takes the starch out of a girl 
like being engaged ; she loses ambition 
right away, and don't amount to anything 



forever after." She eventually falls desper- 
ately in love with a student, who, although 
handsome to the last degree, and possess- 
ing an extraordinary amount of intellect, is 
very weak — absurdly sensitive to ridicule, 
and the ficklest of the fickle. On the whole, 
we do not think very highly of this youth. 
We regret that although the story does not 
end decidedly in white satin and orange 
blossoms, still the reader is left with an 
unpleasant feeling that such is to be the 
result, thus causing the failure of her grand 
plans for the benefit of mankind, as were 
those of the princess Ida, worried in a like 
manner. 

But, excepting the lover, we like the 
book very much, and advise all who can 
to read it. 



Setal Boseip. 

You remember the definition of gossip : 
" It's when nobody don't do nothing, and 
somebody goes and tells of it." 

This winter brings to mind Mark Twain's 
assertion : "One of the brightest gems in 
the New England weather is the dazzling 
uncertainty of it. There is only one thing 
certain about it, — you are certain there is 
going to be plenty of weather — a perfect 
grand review ; but you can never tell which 
end of the procession is going to move 
first." 

She whom we knew as Sadie Holmes, 
now signs herself Mrs. Sadie H. Ford, 
having settled down as the wife of a Pres- 
byterian minister, in Black River Falls, 
Wis. 

Miss Frances E. Willard has received 
an invitation to lecture in England, on the 
subject of temperance. 

Our friend, Miss Jennie Morgan, has 
recently been subject to a disease which 
prevented the extensive use of her facial 
muscles. What a drear thing life must 
have been to her ! 

Miss Carrie Kendig, '79, is still detained 
at home by illness. 

Miss Grace Perley, '76, is teaching elo- 
cution at the Oread Institute, Worcester. 

Miss Mattie Ransom is improving ; ex- 
pects to meet us in the gymnasium in time 
to learn the new "postures." 

The patriotic spirits of many of the girls 
who intended going home on Washington's 
birthday, were noticeably depressed when 
they were informed that they must " bide 
a wee," on account of inclement weather. 



The teacher in Political Economy says that 
coins are continually worn away by being 
carried in the pocket, thus involving a 
heavy loss to the government. Sisters, if 
you love your country, please hand your 
coins to us for security against this great 
loss. 

The Seniors wish people would take 
things for granted — that there might be no 
need for " evidences." 

The faces of the Juniors have lengthened 
perceptibly since the beginning of the 
term. 

When you try to divide twelve oranges 
among five girls, then comes the tug of 
war. 

Happy Hall boasts of an JEolian harp. 

The " D. S. Society" has become a per- 
manent institution. If loftiness of purpose 
attends loftiness of residence, . then, cer- 
tainly, this society has the advantage of its 
sister, the " S. D.," and cannot fail to 
attain unwonted fame. 

On the evening of the 22nd, Lady and 
General Washington received their friends 
in the Seminary parlors. The scene was 
one seldom witnessed. Lady Washington 
conversed socially with Queen Elizabeth ; 
French and German peasants wandered 
about together, regardless of national differ- 
ences ; the Spanish Gipsy told the fortune 
of Jessica, — " most sweet Jew;" two nuns, 
with rosy faces and mischievous eyes, told 
their beads by the side of the cribbage- 
playing Marchioness, who made an intimate 
companion of Titania, the fairy queen. 
For the amusement of the strange gathering, 
Dr. Tourjee sang a "funny song," which 
was pronounced a decided success; and 
after the regulation nectar and ambrosia 
had been dispensed, they retired in a man- 
ner quite like ordinary mortals. 

The subdued excitement which was 
plainly noticeable in the sparkling eyes 
and flying tongues of the " Lasell " girls 
on the 15th, gave decided indications that 
something was on the tapis. That some- 
thing, was nothing less than a sleigh-ride 
to Newton, at which place they were 
delightfully entertained by Mr. and Mrs. 
Mills, and a number of their gentlemen 
friends, whose attention and devotion as 
"waiters," will always be remembered 
with much pleasure. 



4 



LA SELL LEA V E S. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE — 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

l 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
ANNIE H. WHITE, '78. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ALICE N. MAGOUN, '78. IDA S. LONGYEAR. 



PUBLISHER, 
S. LIZZIE EMERSON. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
CORA B. FLINT, '79. LILLIE R. POTTER, '80. 

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We are becoming more impressed every 
day, while meditating in our editorial 
sanctum, with the responsibility of our 
position. Though very much secluded 
from the outer world, we are expected to 
be quick to discover every important move- 
ment in its on-goings. If there is " a tide 
in the affairs of men," it must be from no 
neglect on the part of the editor of a jour 
nal like ours, that his readers fail to "take 
it at the flood." 

Be it known, then, that from an examina- 
tion of our exchanges, and a careful scrutiny 
of shop-windows in our occasional visits 
to the "Hub," we are pursuaded that a tide 
is now setting in the direction of a revival 
of Art. It is now comme il faut to know 
something, or what is just as well, to say 
something, concerning art. Art terms, 
art antiquities and art collections, are in 
vogue, and truly, "one might as well be 
out of the world as out of this fashion." 
Perhaps the particular excitement just now 
most prominent, is that over Ceramics, — a 



term which, it may be well to explain, in- 
cludes everything that has been burned 
and survived the process, from the "little 
brown jug " to the mammoth Sevres vase. 
We may also say, in passing, that the 
uninitiated would be likely to pronounce 
the word amiss ; and on hearing it used for 
the first time by the modern lecturer, would 
be likely to indulge in a fruitless search 
among the K's of a Webster's Una- 
bridged. It should be considered as the 
first and most notable benefit derived from 
this fervor for Ceramics, that everything 
connected with it becomes "changed unto 
something new and strange," not excepting 
the Queen's English. One need not go far 
to see a common jug or vulgar drain-tile 
so bedizened with buds and beetles, butter- 
flies and dragons, as to bring to his mind 
Wordsworth's rhapsody, 

" The meanest flower that blows can give 
Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears," 

and convince him that the tender emotion 
is not limited to flowers. We have thought 
of the same, on seeing a young lady pay a 
dozen dollars for a diminutive saucer, with 
a faded clover painted thereon. 

Closely allied to the "KeramikalKraze," 
is the excitement over Household Deco- 
rative Art ; and this idea of creating a 
" House Beautiful" by fixed laws and reg- 
ulations, is bringing about several laudable 
results, not the least important of which, 
is the disappearance in the modern mansion 
of that which is just now deemed vulgar in 
anybody and anything, viz., individuality. 

The indispensable bric-a-brac collection, 
gives a picturesque appearance to homes, 
not easily imagined by one who has never 
viewed the scene, where are crowded to- 
gether on cabinet, shelf, and floor, Japanese 
porcelains, Chinese enamels, Persian tiles, 
Moorish pottery, pots and pans of Peru, 
and the thousand and one kinds that are 
sent by ship-loads, to contribute to the Art 
Renaissance in America. The picturesque 
appearance of these private museums, 
otherwise called homes, is promoted by 
the introduction of antiques, which play an 
important part in the household art mania. 
Unwieldy time-pieces that have been 
grudged the corner they occupied in the 
attic, now tick their " Forever — Never" in 
the chief places of the synagogues of fash- 
ion ; — though their ticking or not is an un- 
important item ; it's the age only that is 
necessary. Grandmother's andirons stand in 
old time dignity on the hearth ; ugly china, 
with which our ancestors began house- 
keeping, stares from parlor cabinets ; angu- 
lar furniture, which creates an ache in the 



back of one who looks at it, supersedes 
more modern articles, in accordance with 
the respectful maxim, "Age before Beauty." 
But transient as may be the public interest 
in these particular branches of art, frivolous 
even as may be the results growing out of 
the caprice, so far as these have been re- 
ferred to, we think there is an aspect 
worthy of more serious consideration, es- 
pecially, perhaps, in regard to pottery dec- 
oration. In the eagerness to adorn the 
commonest objects of human skill, thou- 
sands have been led to observe, to study, 
and so to admire, the commonest objects of 
nature's handiwork around them. 

Wild flowers, wood ferns, autumn leaves, 
birds, have become a real revelation to not 
a few. A taste for the natural and the real 
in art has been awakened, whose influence 
is observable not alone in household adorn- 
ments, but in the highest efforts of genius. 
The artist of to-day who would attract at- 
tention of the many, must take his subjects, 
and draw his inspiration, not from the 
domain of mythology, or legends, but from 
the realities of every-day life. He must 
paint so as to be understood by the many. 
We visited recently a gallery where were 
on exhibition several paintings, — on one 
side, Bierstadt's " Estes Park, Colorado," 
a broad, sunny landscape ; on the other, 
the celebrated painting, three hundred years 
old, of course, of " Saturn devouring his 
own offspring." 

One was the representation of what is ; 
the other, neither of what is, nor was, nor 
even of what might, could, should, or 
ought to be. 

Visitors sat and gazed at one, cast occa- 
sional glances at the other, and wondered 
why it was there. 

Some months since, Turner's " Slave 
Ship" was on exhibition in Boston. 

People who had burned the midnight oil 
poring over Ruskiu, seized the opportunity 
to behold a veritable Turner. They looked 
at it ; they wondered, and looked again. 
In the meantime, another distinguished 
critic had uttered his views about the phe- 
nomenon. " Really, when the gentleman 
has spread the scrapings of his palette 
upon a milled board, and deliberately sat 
down upon it, it is rather a cool thing to 
send it without further preparation to a 
gallery of art for exhibition." 

And in spite of the great name of Ruskin, 
all the people said " Amen," to this last. 

It seems an advance in the art taste of 
the American public, that it ventures openly 
to criticise works which it is told must be 
admired. 



L A S E L L LEA VE S. 



The lecture of January 23d, concluded the 
course on Latin Literature, delivered by Mr. 
J. L. Stoddard, at the Seminary. Those who 
had listened to his entertaining reminis- 
cences of foreign travel, found in these lec- 
tures on a new subject, no less pleasure 
than they had been led to expect — which 
was not a little. The course consisted of 
five lectures, the subjects of which were re- 
spectively: Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Marcus 
Aurelius, and Cicero. The diversity in the 
lives and writings of these masters of the 
Latin tongue, gave to the lecturer opportu- 
nity for great variety in the treatment of 
his subjects, which the exquisite transla- 
tions with which he embellished each lec- 
ture, formed an especially enjoyable feature. 

We are certain that these lectures awak- 
ened in every classical student, an enthusi- 
astic desire to know more concerning" a 
literature enriched by the works of which 
Mr. Stoddard has given so fine a review. 



On February 6th, Dr. Mary J. Safford 
Blake initiated us into the mysteries of Mor- 
pheus ; teaching us many new and interest- 
ing facts in regard to the subject of "Sleep." 
'Twould be worth while to work, if we 
could hope ever to be so full of facts, and 
so perfect in the way of telling them, as is 
this our " doctor." 



The latest Parisian novelty is the Cooking 
Party. Regular invitations are issued as 
for a reception ; the guests form into sets ; 
a small gas-stove and necessary ingredients 
are given to each couple, and they are 
expected to proceed at once to the cooking 
of any article which their taste may dictate. 

If some of our American women would 
seize at this sensible idea as readily as they 
do at all foolish ones which Paris originates, 
they might be taught to look upon the 
kitchen with a little less absurd horror than 
they now display. 



An association, entitled "Simplicity," 
has been formed by women in Leipsic, "to 
promote simplicity in dress, and make war 
upon all forms of luxury." The members 
are pledged not to wear trains, jewelry, or 
superfluous decorations ; to cultivate and 
teach a standard of simplicity in domestic 
management and social festivity, and to 
devote their leisure, to simple and refining 
pursuits. 



A Western editor says, there is no use 
talking; women can't write as powerful 
and interesting novels as men. " There's 
George Eliot, for instance," he says ; 
' where is the woman who ever wrote as 
strong and popular novels as that gentle- 
man." We are pleased to learn that "that 
gentleman " has in progress a new story, 
entitled, " Brother Jacob." 



The Oberlin Review is one of our most 
entertaining exchanges. " Literary Man- 
ners," in the February number, is particu- 
larly interesting. 

The third number of the Vidette lies , 
upon our table. We are glad to place it 
among our exchanges, and hope it will 
prove true to its indications of a success- 
ul career. 

We are glad to learn, from the pages of 
the Crimson, that Harvard students do pos- 
sess a little of tliat 'valuable commodity, 
ambition, even though that ambition be to 
discover what is " the thing." We had been 
tempted to believe that this was one of the 
emotions which they consider " undigni- 
fied." 

The Tuft's Collegian comes to us with 
excellent contents, as usual. We were 
somewhat surprised, however, to read on 
one page, a sage essay on " Reading as a 
Source of Information ; " and then, turn- 
ing to the columns devoted to book re- 
views, to see " That Wife of Mine " head- 
ing the list. 

The Reveille for February, contains an 
interesting article on a visit to Lucerne. 
We heartily approve of this paper ; it ex- 
hibits goo.d taste and appreciation in its 
criticisms. 

We rejoice to learn from the Williams' 
Athenaeum, that another of the relative tales 
is in progress, entitled "My Grandmother's 
Uncle's Cousin's Wife's Mother's Sister's 
Friend." 

The Tripod for January contains much 
interesting matter ; but we are pained to 
notice the conundrum, " How did Io die ?" 
in its columns. We remember learning that 
Io died of potassium, at a decidedly remote 
period. 

The Bates Student has the following : 
" The Student was not established for the 
benefit of the two or three that may be 
its editors ; nor yet for the purpose of 



bringing them to an untimely grave ; but 
it was established as a medium through 
which graduates could communicate with 
ccie another and with undergraduates. The 
Student can and ought to be made interest- 
ing, profitable and necessary to every 
graduate ; but the Editors cannot accomp- 
lish this unaided." 

We agree with the Student. Graduates 
ought to take an interest in our paper, and 
send us news of our absent comrades. We 
speak not alone of graduates, but of all 
who have been associated with us. Those 
letters Prof. Bragdon asked for, should 
inform us of your whereabouts, sister 
students. 



"f&© Iiffel, In feilllii 11 fe© water has » 

A.i# tlei© at© @£ iMm^ 

Mr. Jones was advised to get his life in- 
sured. "Won't do it ! " he said ; "it would 
be my luck to live forever, if I should." 

"I told her I'd never smoke another 
cigar," he said softly. "And I won't; a 
pipe is plenty good enough for me." 

Not Proven. — Presbyterian minister: 
"Don't you know it's wicked to catch fish 
on the Sawbath ? " Small boy (not having 
had a rise all the morning) : " Wha's 
catchin' fish ? " — Punch.- 

A pompous village clergyman felt his dig- 
nity mightily offended by a chubby-faced 
lad who was passing him without moving 
his hat. "Do you know who I am, sir, 
that you pass me in that unmannerly way ? 
You are better fed than taught, I think, 
sir." " Whew ! may be it is so, for you 
teaches me, but I feeds myself." 

Hawthorne said that "manual labor was 
part of the primeval curse, and that it brut- 
ified whoever had to do with it." Can it 
be possible that tramps read Hawthorne. 

The stranger in Poughkeepsie, says the 
Worcester Pi~ess, thinks he hears the sound 
of trip-hammers, whereas the sound is only 
the familiar thud produced by the Vassar 
College cooks in turning over buckwheat 
cakes. 

" Pat," said a builder to an Irishman en- 
gaged in carrying slate to the top of a four- 
story building, "have you any houses in 
Ireland as tall as this one ? " "Ya'as, Mc- 
Mither's cabin." " How many rooms had 
it?" "There was the ateing-room, the 
slaping-room, the kitchen-room, and the 
pig-pen — four rooms." "That's a story," 
said the builder. "Ya'as, four stories," 
says Pat. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



The evening of Feb. 1st, was the occasion 
of the formal dedication of the "Forum," 
by the members of the S. I). Society. 

The exercises opened with the calling 
of the roll by the Secretary, which, though 
apt to be rather a monotonous process, 
proved quite entertaining on this occasion, 
in consequence of the dignified pride with 
which each member signified that she be- 
longed to the S. D. Society. 

Prayer was offered by Prof. Bragdon, 
and then the regular programme began. 

Misses Ferguson and Stedman rendered 
a piano duo in a manner that would have 
delighted Schubert's heart, could he have 
appeared on the scene. The reading of 
the Prophecy, by Miss Balch, called forth 
much merited applause from the audience, 
particularly when the seeress divulged the 
fact that one of her fair sisters was one day 
to occupy the White House, as President- 
ress of the United States. 

After the singing of a sweet little ballad 
by Miss Curtis, came the Dedication. 

The President, Miss Hamilton, made a 
few happy remarks concerning the growth 
of the Society and its present prosperity ; 
which remarks were followed by a rather 
mystical ceremony consisting of a slow 
march, in total darkness, accompanied by a 
sepulchral-like chant in some dead language. 

The singing of a hymn, composed for the 
occasion by Miss Magoun, concluded the 
exercises. 

The " Forum " has been newly fitted up 
for the Society's use, with bright, tasteful 
adornments, and presents a most inviting 
appearance. The members are enthusias- 
tic workers, and spare neither manual nor 
mental labor in their endeavor to make 
the " S. D." a source of improvement and 
enjoyment. 

We wish them all the success they so 
well deserve. 



Terms for 1878. 



Single copy, one year 
Clubs of 20 or more . 



75 cts. 
$1.00 each. 

Premiums. 

Any one sending quite a number of pay- 
ing subscribers, may select any one article 
from any Dollar Store in Boston. It is 
hoped that the variety will, in this way, 
prove to be satisfactory. 

In the " Battle of the Books " also, we 
are determined not to be outdone. To any 



one sending a pretty large number of sub- 
scriptions, paid in full, we will furnish a 
complete set of the Encyclopedia Britan- 
nica, Unabridged. 

We have ascertained the exact weight of 
this premium, and find it is more than four 
times that of Webster's Unabridged. 

THQUAS D. COOS, 

AGENT FOB THE 
—AND— 

CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 

Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 
very Reasonable Bates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 



SELECT NEW 




Oriental Tea Co. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 




And Boasters and Dealers In 



COFFEE 

The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Omental Tea Co. 




JEjl 




FOR THE YERY BEST FAMILY TRADE. 



Great Reduction in Prices ! 



Don't pay 75 cents to $1.00 per pound for the hest Teas, 
when you can buy just as good for 

60 CTS. PER POUND. 



We are now selling our very best OOLONG, JAPAN and 
ENGLISH BREAKFAST TEAS for 



60 CTS. PER POUND. 

We have selected with great care, about ONE THOU- 
SAND CHESTS from the late importations of NEW 
FORMOSA, OOLONG, JAPAN and ENGLISH BREAK- 
FAST TEAS, which are from the first pickings of the 
young and tender leaves from the Tea Gardens of China 
and Japan, and for delicacy of flavor and fullness of 
strength cannot be surpassed. 

The great reductions in the prices of Teas in Japan and 
China, and the DECLINE IN GOLD, enable us to sell the 
best Teas for 

60 OTS. PER POUND. 

If every one will just lay aside pre judice, on account 
of low prices, we will prove to any and every family in 
the New England States, who will try the above Teas, 
that they are the best sold anywhere. 

The 30 years' experience which we have had, and 
making Teas a specialty, and the great pains taken in the 
selection of Teas, is a suflicient guarantee of satisfaction 
to all our patrons. 

0. D. OOBB & BROS. 

FBINCrP.fl.L WAREHOUSE, 

722, 726 & 728 Washington Street, 

WITH BRANCH STOKES, 

140 Hanover Street, corner Union, 13H and 1313 Wash- 
ington Street, 2035 Washington Street, Boston; Corner 
Main and Milk Streets, Westboro', Mass.; 145 and 147 
Main Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 



L A SELL LEA V E S. 



Successors to John Hall, 



Wholesale & Retail Dealers in 



DOORS, 

SASHES, 



BLINDS, 




MARBLEIZED SLATE 

MANTELS, 
AND SHELVES. 



C. D. Densmore. 



177 and 183 BLACKdTONE STREET, 

(Near Haymarket Sq.,) 

BOSTON. 



C. K. Brackett. 



5T0BE 



***$ 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
hurndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the veiy best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

4®- All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOh'T FOEGET THE PLACE, 
JAMBS -V I O DSL IE ZE=l. S 7 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 

__ m 

L A. ELLIOT & COMPANY, 

(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes,) 
Importers ana Sealers is 

Studies, and other Works of Art, 

At Wholesale and Retail, 
Picture Frames Made to Order. 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings. 



J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 

DEALER IN 

FANCY ©OODS, 

H0TI0HS, TRIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEWTON LOWER FALLS.] 

Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 

Crockery, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Meal & drain, Wholesale & Retail. 

AgencyforMme. Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

CHILDS, FULLER & CO., 

Wholesale & Betail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, UMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &c. 

Agents for Perkins & House's Safety Lamps. 
No. 680 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

J"_ KNOV/IjES db SOWS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET. BOSTON, MASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G-. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

F1UIT AND VEGETABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 
Cellar No. 1, New Fanenil Hall Market, Boston 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hoars. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Betail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No. 9 Boylston Market, Boston, 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Betail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and "Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P, 0, Address, Auburndale. 



IB ft ■•§!¥. 



FASHIONABLE 



STATIONERS, 



37 West Street, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Envelopes are 
elegant and inexpensive. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 




Artist piwtographer, 



Has Removed to 



493 WASHINGTON ST, 



Up one flight, between Temple Place and West Street, 
where, in his elegant rooms and with increased facilities, 
he will be enabled to guarantee perfect satisfaction, at 
the lowest prices. 



[Established 1847.] 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST,, BOSTON. 

L j|) lift # 

Maitonm and intantt look jfaniifarimtrs 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAT. EDWTN S. GAT. 

FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Artist*' ll&terlali 

Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 

BOSTON. 



8 



LASELL LEA VE S 



Grand Educational Excursion 



To Europe, in the summer of 1878, visiting Ireland 
Scotland, England, France, Belgium, the Rhine, Prussia 
Switzerland, Italy, and the Paris Exposition. 

All objectionable features incident to European travel 
Entirely Removed. 

Return Tickets good twelve months. 

College Professors, Teachers of Music and Literature, 
Art Students, School Teachers, and. others of like tastes 
please address, for prospectus, 

E. TOURJEE, 

Music Hall, Boston. 

Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 186T. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



4 



lass Pltotagragljei^ 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 
IMS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
wiih FiiESH Vegetables in their season. 



Goods delivered free of charge. 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.X WHOLESALE AJV» BETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 

76 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 



SWAN <5c NEWTON, 

DEALEES IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. Krt«Trti%I 

S. B. NEWTON. BOSTON. 



HENRY F. MILLER, 

FIAIO-IOBTI HAIUI 



BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to he finely made and to prove reliably and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 
©et@eKT@ui], imss. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WAEES, 

EVERYTHING AX THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

WATERS & IN MAN, 

"west NEvrTonsr _A.isr:D .A.tTB-uttisriD.A.ii.E:, 
DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FRANK WOOD, 
STEAM PRINTEE, 

352 VVasriington Street, 
Nearly opposite Bromfield Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

J OS IE IE 3 IE! -VST. GrRIG-G, 

Manufacturer of aid Sealer in Enameled Slate 

I1ITLIS 1MB BlICIIT SHELVES, ETC, 

Also. English Fluor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Tarlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromfield 

street, .Boston, Mass. 

THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON- 
JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 
Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New F. H. Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

NICHOLS db H^^.IjI_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, 



BOSTON. 



"W. H. FRENCH <Sc CO. 
Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

Soots* f§Ii®©s & MmWUwwm 

EEPAIEIHG ?B0MFTL7 ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



L0CKW00D, BROOKS & CO., 
jjuMtefare, IJoofeelkl mid HMomi$, 

381 "Washington St., Boston. 
Dealers in all kinds of 



And Books in every department of Literature. Plain 
and Fancy Stationery in the greatest variety. Artistic 
Designing and Engraving a specialty. Fine Printing 
executed in the best style. 

- Correspondence solicited. « = g38 r 



THOMAS HALL, 

HTUHG ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 

Telegraphical, Philosophical, Mathematical, Optical 

Galvanic, and Chemical Instruments 

of all Descriptions. 

Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. See Hall's lllnstrated Telegraph I'atalogne. 



^i^se^iSEes 



Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing' an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing; their contracts. 

FOR 



ffeig 



&mrsit 



'INFORMATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisinr 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



^tVftNS^SZWASHINGTON^BbsTON 



From Paine's Illustrated Price-List. 




No. 5. 



No. 10. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide- 
French Burl Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 

No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY, 

Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 

No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00' 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Canal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





TDTJ^ZL I^IE] hA-JUST^ FACTI." 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., MARCH, 1878. 



Number 6. 



Confidence is a plant of slow growth, whether it is 
shown in business, politics or religion. Men will support 
other men financially or politically, if they have confi- 
dence in their integrity and. industry. The public gener- 
ally will uphold those men in whom they have confidence, 
and they will patronize those firms in business whose 
word has never been questioned or proved unworthy. 
Never in the whole history of our Country, have we felt 
the need of confidence more in business. 

The reckless methods of doing business, induced by the 
war-times and the financial insecurity of the past four 
years, have made us cautious and slow to place our trust 
in anything or anybody. It seems, then, that the public 
should know who to buy of and what firms are reliable. 

Among the firms in Boston who have the entire 
confidence of the community, 

Messrs. John H. Pray, Sons k Co., 

OF 

558 and 560 Washington St. 

the well-known carpet dealers, stand high upon the list. 

Since 1817, father and sons have dealt with the people 
in their line of goods, and they have established a repu- 
tation which many old Boston firms fully appreciate, and 
which the younger ones may well strive to secure. 

The permanent and profitable success they have 
achieved is a gratifying example of the result of fair and 
honorable dealing. The fact that they have not a large 
building with modern conveniences at an exorbitant 
rent, allows them to sell goods at a very reason able profit, 
though, as the public are aware, they have abundant 
facilities for transacting the immense business their 
books annually record. As usual, they are now making 
extensive preparations for the 

SPRING TRADE 

OP 

18 7 8.. 

Of all the xisual grades of high and low-priced 

Carpetings, 
Mattings, 
Oil Cloths, 

they have a large stock, and all for sale at the 

Very 

Smallest 
Margin 

Of Profit 

that an honorable firm can do business and live under. 

Their announcements are all strong ones, and will be 
fully believed by the public, while their modest invita- 
tions to simply examine stock and prices before purchas- 
ing elsewhere, will undoxibtedly be accepted by thousands 
of people. 



A faff ii femtij. 

" Go to the Fair ? " "Of course we'll go ! 
Everybody will be there ! " 

And this is what we saw. According to 
the programme published weeks before 
hand, we " assembled ourselves," in best 
bib and tucker, at the grave and venerable 
court-house, from a window of which flared 
out the red and black stripes of the com- 
monwealth. As the old clock, with its 
three queer faces, says nine, we enter the 
hall, whose thick walls, small windows, and 
heavy rafters, suggest the days when 
things were made to last. Evidently, no 
one thought of gatherings of the people 
such as America sees, for the room is not 
more than twenty-five by thirty-five feet in 
size. On a table is a bust of the King of 
Wurtemberg. Behind the table walks the 
President of the Association, thinking over 
his speech. He has been pressed for time 
this morning, for his personal appearance 
indicates haste in the getting together of 
his apparel. Those queer-looking men 
who resemble so much the prints we used 
to see of George Washington and the 
Federal Congress, are German peasants. 
They wear cocked hats with feathers in 
them, long earthen pipes, coats whose 
skirts commence just under the arm, and 
reach nearty to the ground, and whose 
front is decorated with rows of metal but- 
tons set as closely together as possible. 
Yonder are their wives. You may know 
them as peasant women by the queer head- 
dresses, — which look like bead pin-cushions 
in black nets, — on the back of their heads, 
where most women have a knot of hair. 
These are the farmers — they and the men. 
I put it so purposely, for in the work, 
the woman seems the better half of the 
team. 

The men, as they come in, are attacked 
by a jolly little old woman, who fastens 
among those buttons pieces of ribbon, 
some red and some white. Is everybody 
an officer to-day ? for she is impartial, and 
even offers to put one on us. Now the 
president delivers his speech, which is the 
usual glorification of agriculture in general, 
and of this association in particular. He 
doesn't mention how much the officers ex- 



pect to net from the show to-day and the- 
lottery to-morrow. 

Now we go in procession to the Fest 
Plats, in the outskirts. Here we look for 
the real fair, remembering the fairs of our 
boyhood. But where is it ? About ten 
square feet of table contain the following : 
A dozen corn-stalks, and a dozen rabbits ^ 
about two dozen each of ordinary-enough 
apples, pears, plums, potatoes, and grapes ; 
a few cucumbers, tomatoes, beans, beets, 
squashes, and pumpkins ; some models of 
machines, and some photographs. Near by- 
are a half-dozen ploughs. Looking care 
fully about, we find no more. Oh ! yes ^ 
three fruit-stands, two beer-wagons, and a 
circus-tent, of which a serious study de- 
cides that the circus attracts the greatest, 
number of people, counting small boys. 
Indeed, one would have thought that the 
people came to get beer and see the circus, 
and that the few vegetables were some- 
body's private and unsuccessful venture,, 
rather than that the former were only side- 
shows. The oddest sight for us, and, we 
confess, the most like home, was a live- 
African — the first we have seen in Ger- 
many, except a few travelling on the Khine, 
There he stood, as natural as life, as much, 
at home as in Virginia, and feeling his im- 
portance, too. When he opened his mouth r 
lo ! he spoke German. He acted as caller- 
in at the door of the tent, and was as- 
much of a curiosity to the natives as the 
girl with the blue-and-gilt apron, and bells 
in her hair. So much for the Fair. We- 
concluded, as we turned sadly away, that- 
these people don't care as much for dis- 
playing their big potatoes in saucers, la- 
beled, as they do for getting a big price- 
for them. 



$ a frost, ifeq. 

The exact origin of the Frost family is- 
not definitely known. Probably it is very 
ancient, for it is certain that one of this 
family was the first native white man to 
greet Columbus on his first visit to this 
country; though it is said that this recep- 
tion was rather a cool one. 

History leaves us in comparative igno- 
rance of the doings of this family ; but this. 



LA SELL LEAVES 



much is certain, each member is what his 
father was before him. The Jack of the 
present day is,— well, 'I won't attempt to say- 
just how old — probably much older than 
he looks ; he is sufficiently tall, or, rather, 
"long," and has the faculty of extending 
himself at will, to most wondrous lengths. 
He is rather corpulent than thin ; and 
there is no reason why he should not be, 
for he is certainly a gourmand. I suppose 
we should be astonished, if we knew the 
amount of vegetables alone which he de- 
vours every autumn. Jack, like his father, 
has a very cool temper ; has a great liking 
for practical jokes, and is a saucy fellow. 

In his youth his father destined him for an 
artist ; so an artist he essayed to become ; 
and there is no doubt but that if he had 
persevered, he would have been the most 
celebrated one of his day; for his pencilings 
are inimitable, and he did successfully 
what no other artist dare attempt, viz., 
sketching upon glass. Then his paintings 
of foliage, particularly — what tints ! what 
shading ! 

Jack, however, did not wish to give his 
whole attention to painting, so he tried his 
hand at sculpture, and with a similar result. 
At last he concluded to try a mercantile 
life, and he accordingly applied for a posi- 
tion in the wholesale house of " Winter & 
Co.," where he has been employed ever 
since as a runner; and a faithful servant he 
is, too. His employment is constant, for 
when business is dull in this countiy, he is 
sent across the ocean to the other continent, 
where this same firm has an establishment. 
There is lively competition between the 
house of " Winter & Co." and that of 
" Summer and Son." I have alluded to 
Jack's propensity for playing practical 
jokes, and he sometimes makes his business 
opponents his victims, as will be seen. 

In the spring of the past year, " Summer 
A Son," who had had their runners out for 
some time, succeeded in making a contract 
for furnishing this section of the country 
with supplies for the coming year. The 
supplies were thriving; everj'thing was 
going on satisfactorily, and " Summer & 
Son " congratulated themselves on their 
success. Meanwhile, Jack was not idle. 
One morning, what was the surprise of 
"Slimmer, Jr.," — who was somewhat 
" green" at his business, having been left 
alone in it by the decease of his father, — 
on looking out of his window, to see that 
Jack had been about, and to see his mark 
on the crop, thus pretty effectually " nip- 
ping in the bud " Summer's prospects. 
Here was richness for Jack, but a sorry 



predicament for Summer. This is only one 
of many like instances in which our friend 
has displayed his character, and we are 
convinced that his will truly be 

" One of the few, the immortal names, 
That were not born to die." 



EisMil 

The telegram which, on March 3d, 
brought us news of the death of John Rus- 
kin, filled with sorrow the hearts of many 
who have pored over his delightful volumes ; 
and the contradiction of the report caused 
a great thankfulness that one of the world's 
greatest minds is still spared to us. A few 
facts may be interesting concerning this 
master spirit, which the hand of Death has 
so nearly taken from us. Ruskin is best 
known to us as an art critic, though he has 
figured largely as a philanthropist and po- 
litical economist. He was born in Feb- 
ruary, 1819, in London. His school days 
were passed at Christ College, Oxford, but 
an anecdote he tells of himself goes far to 
prove Emerson's saying, "Men are what 
their mothers make them." Addressing a 
supposed audience of working-men, he 
says: 

"It is only by deliberate effort that I re- 
call the long morning hours of toil, as reg- 
ular as sunrise — toil on both sides equal — 
by which, year after year, my mother 
forced me to learn all my Scotch para- 
phrases by heart, and ever so many chapters 
of the Bible beside (the eighth of 1st Kings 
being one ; try it, good reader, in a leisure 
hour), allowing not so much as a syllable 
to be missed or misplaced, while every 
sentence was required to be said over and 
over again, till she was satisfied with the 
accent of it. I recollect a struggle be- 
tween us of about three weeks, concerning 
the accent of the "of" in the lines, 

' Shall any following spring revive 
The ashes of the urn ? ' 

I insisting, partly in childish obstinacy, 
and partly in true instinct for rhythm (being 
widely careless on the subject both of urns 
and their contents), in reciting it, 'The 
ashes of the urn.' It was not, I say, till 
after thi-ee weeks' labor, that my mother got 
the accent laid upon the ashes, to her mind. 
But had it taken three years, she would 
have done it, having once undertaken to do 
it. And assuredly had she not done it, I had 
been simply an avaricious picture collector, 
or perhaps even a more avaricious money 
collector, to this day ; and had she done 
it wrongly, no after-study would ever have 



enabled me to read so much as a single line 
of verse." 

To his perseverance and earnestness of 
purpose, Ruskin owes much of his success. 
His first pamphlet was in defence of 
Turner and the modern English school of 
landscape painting. Even those who have 
not read Ruskin's works extensively, have 
read his beautiful description of Turner's 
" Slave Ship," in which it seems to many 
that Ruskin has drawn a more admirable 
picture with the pen, than Turner with the 
brush. This pamphlet on Turner Ruskin 
afterward enlarged, and made the founda- 
tion of his work entitled "Modern Painters," 
of which the fifth volume was illustrated by 
himself. 

He has been, since 1867, Rede lecturer 
at Cambridge, and Slade Professor at Ox- 
ford since 1872, and many of his works are 
reprints of the lectures delivered at these 
two colleges. Some of his best-known 
works are " Stones of Venice," and the 
"Seven Lamps of Architecture," written 
during the seventeen years he spent in 
Venice, and other prominent cities of 
Europe. Other works are " King of the 
Golden River," "Elements of Perspec- 
tive," "Ethics of the Dust," " Sesame and 
the Lilies," " Crown of Wild Olive," and 
" Queen of the Air." 

Joseph Cook says of Ruskin, that he has 
sustained six characters in the present 
generation ; that of art critic, political 
economist, philanthropist, master of Eng- 
lish prose, prose poet, philosophical evan- 
gelical Christian believer. 

As a political economist, he does not 
take any high rank, but he has brought 
his philanthropy to the subject, and carried 
into practice many things of which Carlyle 
only preached. His large fortune he has 
expended mainly on philanthropical objects. 
He is not a fanatic, but a genuine lover, of 
mankind. 

Joseph Cook gives as an example of his 
mastery of the English language, this 
strikingly-beautiful sentence, descriptive 
of the breaking of a heavy ocean surge 
against a cliff: "One moment a flinty 
cave ; the next, a marble pillar ; the next, 
a fading cloud." He is truly an artist in 
the world of letters. His descriptions are 
vivid pictures, drawn with striking accu- 
racy. He is possessed of a deep love for 
the beautiful, and as strong a love for the 
true. 

Ruskin is strongly imbued with a noble 
Christian principle. To this, Joseph Cook 
ascribes much of his success. Educated 
under the strictest orthodoxy, he rebelled 



LA S E L L L E A V E S 



against what he called its narrowness, but 
all his life he has lived up to its doctrines ; 
and he not only believes the doctrines, but 
lives up to their precepts. His ideas on 
the subject are well expressed in the fol- 
lowing extract from his " Letter to Young 
Girls:" "Don't wear white crosses, nor 
black dresses, nor caps with lappets. But 
know and feel assuredly, that every day of 
your lives, you have done all you can for 
the good of others. Done, I repeat ! not 
said. For material charity, let older and 
wiser people see to it ; and be content, like 
Athenian maids in the procession of their 
home goddess, with the honor of carrying 
the basket." 



Was ftiB &%m Wslis©i iliemolea Waii, 

Der 18te Januar war ein kalter Winter- 
tag, Schnee bedeckte die Fluren ; doch, 
die Sonne leuchtete so freundlich vom 
blauen Himmelszelte herab, dass auch der 
Traegste hier verlockt wurde die vier 
warmen Mauern auf kurze Zeit zu verlas 
sen. 

Mich leitete die Wanderlust an jenem 
Tage nach West Newton ; und waehrend 
ich mich in der Erinnerung weidete an 
zwei, von den Damen der " Newton Horti- 
cultural Society," Abends vorher gelesenen 
"Essays," bemcrkte ich zu meinen Fuessen, 
in dem glitzernden Schnee, eine grosse, 
weisse Nelke. Sie mochte schon viele 
Stunden dort gelegen haben, denn der 
Frost hatte ihr das Ansehen verliehen, als 
sei sie aus Wachs gefoimt. Armes Bluem- 
chen ! Vor Kurzem prangtest du in tro- 
pischer Hitzc unter Rosen und schoenen 
Pflanzen in einem Treibhause, bis des 
Gaertners Hand dich von dem muetterlichen 
Stamme trennte. Du solltest vielleicht ein 
junges Maedchen schmuecken, oder helfen 
einen Geburtstagstisch zu zieren ; vielleicht 
wollte man durch dich eine ICranke erfreu- 
en, oder dich auf den Sarg eines Abge- 
schiedenen legen ! Statt desscn fielst du 
auf die Landstrasse, wo Nacht und Kaelte 
dich fast vernichteten ! Unter solchen 
Betrachtungen nahm ich die Nelke auf, 
barg sie in der warmen Hand, bis ich 
zurucckgekehrt war, und stellte sie in 
kaltes Wasser. Doch, umsonst! Ihr Duft 
war dahin, ihr Kelch gelb, und ihre einst 
so schoenen Blumenblaetter hingen herab, 
waesscrig klar und gleichsam wie mit 
Thraenen durchzogen. Was sollte sie noch 
hier stchen ? Ich warf sie zum Fenster 
hinaus, doch mit wehmuethigem Gefuehle ; 
denn, erinnerte nicht ihr Loos an das ver- 
fehlte Leben so manches jungen Mamies, so 



manches lieblichen Maedchens, die, aufge- 
wachsen unter den wachsamen Augen treuer 
Eltern, unter Segenswunschen zu ihrer 
Fortbildung aus dem Elternhause ent- 
lassen wurden, und, zu schwach der Ver- 
suchung schlechter Freunde zu wider- 
stehen, geistig untergingen. 

Mein letzter Gedanke an die todte Blume 
war der innige Wunsch, dass keines unserer 
jungen Maedchen in " Lasell " ihr Loos 
theilen moege ! 



Tie Stuaiio. 

We are glad to notice that the students, 
after showing to their friends the lower 
part of the Seminary, follow the Scripture 
injunction, and " go up higher," to the 
Studio. The interest and appreciation 
which they express, prove that they agree 
with us in considering the Lasell Studio 
quite a model of its kind. It consists of 
two rooms, the first being principally de- 
voted to crayon. Those devoted to this 
branch display great proficiency in their 
work. One of the young ladies is at 
present copying the head of a beautiful 
Spanish lady, with a delicacy of finish that 
is very much admired by all who see it. 
Occupying a prominent position in the apart- 
ment is an exquisite copy of one of the Cher- 
ubim, presented to the Studio by the artist. 

In the second room, attention is chiefly 
given to painting in oils. In one corner, 
indicative, possibly, of the owner's retiring 
disposition, stands an easel holding a can- 
vas on which " Pharaoh's Horses " is being 
reproduced with remarkable accuracy. Di- 
rectly opposite, a dog's head starts from 
the canvas ; that is, we are told that it is 
such. Judging from the fact that it is now 
in the same condition in which we saw it 
three weeks ago, we can not but fear that 
the owner considers it finished ; and, with 
the kindest intentions, we would suggest 
that there is considerable room for improve- 
ment still. 

Regarding the apron alone of her who 
occupies the place by the window, an un- 
prejudiced mind might suppose that the 
young woman devotes her powers to trans- 
ferring the paint from her palette to that 
article of apparel ; but those who have seen 
her beautiful work would refute such an 
accusation most indignantly. Some of the 
finest work is that done in small shells and 
0*11 smooth stones ; also, the " ceramic art" 
is well represented, — for Lasell has not 
escaped the pottery mania, — and at present 
a large vase, growing into beauty under 
the hand of a late lunior, excites the atten- 



tion and admiration of all who visit the 
Studio. 

There are innumerable landscapes and 
flower studies, "jewels, every one;" but 
we are obliged to take them collectively, 
and say of the former, that the softness and 
brightness of their coloring and the misti- 
ness of " atmosphere," might induce one to 
believe that a Turner had been there at 
work ; but as to that, we are given to under- 
stand that all those connected with the 
Studio, consider one West vastly superior 
to any number of Turners. 

One of the chief attractions of this magi- 
cal place, where the dull brown paint leaps 
into sunshine when applied by the hand of 
— well, not of a Titian or a Maran, but 
surely their most earnest disciples ; one of 
the chief attractions, we say, and possibly 
an assistance to the students, is the vein of 
music that flows continually through the 
working-time. Surely, the young ladies 
cannot be too grateful to the gifted ones, 
who, by the unceasing exercise of their 
musical ability, cause the cares that might 
otherwise infest the day, to " fold their 
tents like the Arabs, and as silently steal 
away." We would remind the unappreci- 
ative few who object to these daily musi- 
cal rehearsals, of fair Portia's opinion of 
him who is not moved by concord of sweet 
sounds, although, if the truth were known, 
we think that at times they are consider- 
ably moved. 

Altogether, we consider those who work 
in the Studio very fortunate, and envy them 
their pleasure. 



The following makes us think of how we 

feel sometimes, when Miss is letting 

off her vocal pyrotechnics — practicing her 
exercises, she calls it ! 

Doctor Jonson was observed by a mu- 
sical friend of his, to be extremely inatten- 
tive at a concert while a celebrated solo- 
player was running up the divisions and 
sub-divisions of notes upon his violin. His 
friend, to induce him to take greater notice 
of what was going on, told him the perform- 
ance was very difficult. "Difficult, sir," 
replied the doctor; "I wish it was im- 
possible ! " — Ex. 

" In Boston University, a ' Shakespeare 
Club ' has been formed among the ladies of 
the College of Liberal Arts." — Ex. 

The world ought to know about our 
Societies ! We don't pretend to such a 
grand name, but the hard work we do, espec- 
ially between eight and nine o'clock, will 
sometime, if persevered in, put the " S. 
D's, " and "D. S's," where Shakespeare 
himself would be proud to be named after 
them! 



LA SEL L LEA VE S, 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
ANNIE H. WHITE, '78. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ALICE N. MAGOUN, '78. IDA S. LONGYEAR. 



PUBLISHER, 
S. LIZZIE EMERSON. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
CORA B. FLINT, ' 7 g. LILLIE R. POTTER, '8o. 

TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage), 75 cts. 

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It is said of Henry Stanly, whose praises 
are just now so enthusiastically rung, that, 
starting on his exploring tour a young and 
vigorous-looking man, he came home with 
the whitened hair and care-worn face of 
■one who had, as it were, crowded years of 
life into those months of absence. 

As rapid and as surprising has been the 
growth of his fame. Going a young, in- 
■experienced adventurer, bound, as it 
seemed, on a wild and vain quest, he comes 
back loaded with honors, with a name 
which will ever be associated with the far- 
away land whose mystery he has assisted 
in solving. Those who laughed when he 
started out with boyish enthusiasm, now 
.are the ones to praise and fete him ; and 
-all because he has opened another corner 
of the earth to human curiosity ; because 
he has succeeded in coming back alive 
from the tour of a land that no one else 
dares or cares to visit. 

The one thing to be desired above others, 
just now, is the discovery of something 



new and strange. Explorations are car- 
ried on at an astonishing rate. The whole 
crust of the earth bids fair to be under- 
mined by these wielders of the pickaxe and 
shovel. Nothing less than the stones of 
Priam's palace, the very head-dress of 
Helen of Troy, the veritable bones of Ag- 
amennon, satisfy modern savants. A late 
paper announces that full half a dozen 
expeditions to the North Pole are proposed 
for the year. Money, time, very likely 
lives thrown away, because some aspiring 
individual wants to say that he has stood 
on the North Pole ! 

The time can but come soon when these 
monomaniacs will be ready to throw away 
the "poor squeezed orange of the world," 
and weep for more spheres to conquer. 

We are sadly speculating as to what will 
be left for us to do when we bid good-bye 
to school-days, and step into the field of 
the world. We women are constantly 
urged to join in the struggle for name and 
fame ; but little prospect of success is left 
us, if men persist in acting up to the char- 
acter which they display in a crowded car — 
step in front of us, drop into the one empty 
seat, and smile at the helplessness of 
women. 



A long-felt need at Lasell has been 
supplied by the acquisition of a cabinet of 
mathematical instruments, secured through 
the energy of the teacher and generosity 
of the pupils in that department. 

It is hoped that our mathematicians of 
this term, will find their work rendered 
easy by the use of these substantial illus- 
trations, and will obtain a clear understand- 
ing of the subject. The Metric System is 
well represented by its various measures, 
and geometrical figures of every kind 
appear on the shelves of this useful cabinet. 
The Seniors and Juniors sigh plaintively 
on passing the door of No. 1, at the thought 
that they have no part nor parcel in this 
new-found treasure. 



Among the movements toward a more 
practical education in our school, is that 
for the establishment of a department of 
cookery, under the direction of Miss Parloa. 
We expect in a few years that among the 
exercises of Commencement day at Lasell, 
there will be not only a literary feast, but 
also entertainment more rejoicing to the 
heart of man. We anticipate exercises 
similar to those at Miss Parloa's school a 



few days ago, when the ladies gave a dinner- 
party consisting of ten courses, prepared by 
themselves. May we be there to see — and 
eat. 



"Christmas 

On the evening of March 13th, the pupils 
in Elocution, under the direction of Prof. 
S. R. Kelly, gave a recitation of Dickens' 
Christmas Carol. The young ladies who 
took part in the entertainment, Misses 
Magoun, Linscott, Haskell, Holbrook, Dar- 
ling, Dunsmore and Converse, in the inter- 
pretation of their respective parts, displayed 
a perfect understanding of the meaning of 
the author, and won much merited applause 
for their excellent portrayal of the various 
dramatis personce, from Scrooge himself to 
Tiny Tim. 

The recitations were illustrated by the 
stereopticon, giving views of characteristic 
scenes during the progress of the story. 

The proceeds are for the benefit of the 
Library fund. 



mmim liitusaL 

On Monday evening, March 18th, the 
Musical Rehearsal for the term took place. 
The exercises were very enjoyable to all 
present, the performance reflecting great 
credit upon those connected with it. 

It commenced with a vocal duo, " I 
heard a voice," by Misses Johnson and 
Miller, followed by an instrumental solo, 
by Miss Boit. Miss Tourjee then gave a 
waltz, entitled, "L'Estasi." A scherzo of 
Mendelssohn, by Miss Hatch, a vocal solo, 
"Joan of Arc," by Miss Miller, an instru- 
mental solo, by Miss Dickson, and a song, 
'* Longing," by Miss Ferguson, closed the 
first part. 

Part second opened with a song, " Fisher 
Boy's Lament," by Miss Johnson. A rondo, 
by Miss Tourjee, a sacred song, " Con- 
sider the Lilies," by Miss Linscott, an in- 
strumental solo, by Miss Magoun, and a 
vocal trio, by Misses Ferguson, Miller, and 
Stedman, comprised the closing part of one 
of the most enjoyable rehearsals that the 
Seminary has produced. 



liiijt Class Iillllitei, 

On Wednesday evening, March 19, the 
friends of Lasell gathered to listen to the 
entertainment given by the Junior Class, 
assisted by a few other members of the 
school. The Chapel was tastefully deco- 



LASELL LEAVES, 



rated with pictures from our own Studio, 
the class motto, " Wir Sind Nicht; Wir 
Werden," in evergreen, together with 
beautiful collections of choice flowers, 
kindly contributed by Mr. Atkinson, of 
West Newton. The floral wreath which 
surrounded the figures "79 was particularly 
noticeable, and excited universal admira- 
tion. 

In accordance with the dainty little pro- 
grammes, combining the class colors, lav- 
•endar and pink, the exercises opened with 
^a vocal duo, by Misses Miller and Fergu- 
son. Prayer was offered by Dr. Mac- 
Keown, after which Miss Lizzie Atkinson, 
of West Newton, read the first essay, sub- 
ject, " Drifting." 

Miss Hattie Haskell, a special student, 
followed with a reading of " King Robert 
of Sicily." The second essay was read by 
Miss Cora B. Flint, of Fall River, subject, 
" The Good Old Times," followed by music 
•by Miss Jennie Hayes. The third essay 
was by Miss Carrie Kendig, of Worcester, 
■on " Women Artists." Miss Alice Lins- 
cott recited "The Maiden Martyr," and 
Miss Irene Sanford, from Brockton, fol- 
lowed with the last essay, " The World Is 
What We Make It." The programme 
closed with a solo by Miss Nellie Ferguson. 

The essays gave evidence of thought and 
culture, and the essayists acquitted them- 
selves admirably. The whole entertain- 
ment, indeed, reflected no little credit upon 
the Class of '19. 



NAMflJ. 



A peculiar feature of the work at Lasell 
is the instruction in the physiology of the 
vocal organs given to the students in voice 
culture. By the use of casts, charts, and 
specimens from the human body, our stud- 
ents become familiar with the various parts 
of the vocal organism. The examination 
at the close of the winter term was upon 
the muscles of respiration, with an analysis 
of the larynx. The action of the epiglottis 
was completely described, and its great im- 
portance in vocal culture dwelt upon. Prof. 
Wheeler succeeds in making these lectures 
very simple and entertaining to his pupils ; 
and, by his untiring efforts, our voice de- 
partment is getting a reputation not only 
for fine execution, but for the most thorough 
knowledge of all helpful physiological de- 
tails. Few teachers of the voice are so 
painstaking and thoughtful of the different 
capacities of different voices as is Mr. 
Wheeler. The lectures and lessons for the 



coming term will be upon "Resonance," 
"Registers of the Voice," "The Nervous 
System in its Relation to Vocalization," 
"The Different Schools of Vocal Culture, 
and Their Practical Results." 



loan Items, 

A casual observer, the other night, was 
led to the conclusion that the Darwinian 
doctrine was in favor at the Seminary, be- 
cause of the sisterly interest manifested by 
the girls in the attendant of a hand-organ, 
which had appeared on the scene, as a 
harbinger of spring. 

The tour which we recently made through 
France and Germany, under the direction 
of our German instructress, proved to be a 
melancholy repetition of " Barmecide's 
Feast." 

" Souvenir d'Auburndale," is the title 
of a lately-discovered treasure, in the form 
of a classic bit of instrumental music 
dedicated to Lasell Seminary. 

We hear that Mr. H. F. Durant intends 
to erect a preparatory college, in Welles- 
ley, which is to be nearly, if not quite as 
large, as the present edifice. 

We were favored with a visit from Miss 
Annie King, a short time ago. The favor 
would have been greater, if the visit had 
been longer. 

Bishop R. S. Foster is to deliver the 
Baccalaureate sermon, in June. 

The familiar face of Miss Mac Donald 
was seen at the Seminary last week. We 
are glad to learn that she intends making 
Auburndale her home. 

We rejoice that the health of Miss Carrie 
Kendig, permited her to come to the rescue 
of her unfortunate sister Juniors. 

It is a matter of regret, to us, as well as 
to them, that Misses Curtis, Haskell, Mat- 
tie and Bertie Burnham, are not to remain 
with us during the rest of the year. 



The European tour which Mr. and Mrs. 
Bragdon intend making with "their 
girls," and such friends as desire to join 
them, during the coming summer vacation, 
promises to be a delightful opportunity to 
enjoy and receive benefit from the sights 
of the Old World. 

The party (limited to twenty, probably 
not over fifteen), includes several former 
pupils, and present members of the school, 



who gladly avail themselves of the chance 
to travel under such excellent guidance 
and personal oversight. 

It is Mr. Bragdon's intention to join the 
party of Dr. L. C. Loomis, who has had 
large experience in foreign travel. 

The plan of the journey (see Itinerary 
below), includes Scotland, England, Holl- 
and, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland and 
Italy, with a stay of about ten days in Paris, 
affording ample time for obtaining a good 
idea of the Exposition. 

The party leave New York, June 20th, 
intending to return about September 5th. 
In the words of the little circular which 
gives the plan of the tour, " Parents may 
be assured that no pains will be spared to 
render the trip, in all respects, satisfactory, 
and will do well to remember that such an 
opportunity for their daughters to visit 
Europe under friendly supervision, may 
not again be offered. 

" A trip to Europe is an unfolding of a 
new life, — a means of culture which will 
repay large sacrifice, and specially valuable 
to the young." 

The cost of the route arranged by Mr. 
Bragdon, is to be $500, gold. The juncture 
with Dr. Loomis' party, however, renders 
available to members of Mr. Bragdon's 
company, the tours of Dr. Loomis, some 
of which are shorter, others longer, with 
corresponding prices, as follows : 

No. 1, including Glasgow, London, Belgium, and the Rhine 
to Lucerne. Then, not crossing the Alps, hut spend- 
ing more time in Switzerland, and two weeks in Paris, 
$400 Gold. 

No. 2, including the above and adding eight days in Scot- 
land and England, $450 Gold. 

No. 3, including No. 1 as far as Lucerne, then over 
the St. Gothard Pass into Italy, and to Milan, Venice, 
Florence, Rome, Naples, (Vesuvius) Pompeii, Pisa, 
Genoa, Turin, Geneva, Chamonix, (Mt. Blanc), a week 
in Paris, Versailles, London, $500 Gold. 

No. 4, same as No. 3, with addition of Scotland and Eng- 
land, returning August 30, $550 Gold. 



which Mr. Bragdon adds to the above Is 
the following itinerary: — 

Leave New York. 

Arrive at Glasgow. 

Via Loch Lomond and Loch Katrine to the 

Trossachs. 
The Trossachs; Stirling Castle to Edin- 
boro'. 
\ In Edinboro' ; the Castle, Holyrood, Calton 
) Hill, etc. 
To Melrose and Abbottsford. 
Melrose Abbey. 
To Stratford-on-Avon. 
Oxford, Kcnilworth, Warwick to London. 

Evening boat via Flushing to Antwerp. 
Antwerp, Hotel de la Paix. The Cathedral. 
Ruben's Elevation and Descent. The 
Church of St. Jacques; St. Paul's. 
Brussels, early train. Drive, passing the 
Botanical Gardens, PI. du Congress, Pal- 
ace Royal, Statue of Godfrey de Bouillon 
St. Gudule, Hotel de Ville, Mon. to Counts 
Egmont and Hoorne; the Bourse, Opera 
' House. Evening train (2.10) to Cologne, 
through the rich mining districts of the 
Brabrant. 



The route 


according to 


Th. 


June 20. 


M. 


July 1. 


T. 


" 2. 


W. 


" 3. 


T. 


" 4. 


F. 


" 5. 


S. 


" C. 


Sun 


" 7. 


M. 


" S. 


T. 


" 9. 



w. 



10. 



" 11. 



6 



LA SELL LEA FES. 



F. July 12. 



13. 



Sun. 


CI 


u. 


M. 


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15. 


T. 


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16. 


W. 


tt 


17. 


Th. 


it 


18. 



P. 


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S. 


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Sun. 


" 21. 


M. 


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T. 



23. 



Cologne. Hotel du Nord. The Cathedral. 
Afternoon boat (1-9) to Coblentz. Hotel 
Bellevue. Luggage booked to Heidelberg. 

Coblentz. The Rhine to Mayenoe (7-3); 
railway to Heidelberg (4-8). 

Heidelberg. Hotel Schloss. 

Heidelberg. The Castle. Morning train 
(9-5), through the plains of the Palati- 
nate, and along the Black Pore6t to 
Lucerne. 

Lucerne. Hotel National. At pleasure. 

Lucerne. Ascent of the Rigi by railway 
(5,900 ft.). [Swiss party diverges to 
Brienze.] 

Lake Lucerne ; TelPs Chapel ; Fluelen. Take 
Diligence for the St. Gothard Pass. Altorf 
—the place of Tell's Shooting the Apple; 
Amsteg; the great St. Gothard Tunnel; 
Devil's Bridge; Andermatt, to Hospen- 
thal. Hotel Meyerhof. 

St. Gothard Pass (6,936 ft.); Ariolo; Faido 
to Bellinzona. 

Bellinzona. Hotel Angel. Diligence to 
Magadino. Steamer down Lake Maggiore, 
passing the Borromean Isles toArona; 
railway to Milan. 

Milan. Hotel Pozzo. The Cathedral. 

To Venice, (5-3) along the foot of the Alps, 
and Lake Garda; via Bergamo, Verona, 
and Padua. 

Venice. Hotel d'Angleterre. Academy of 
Art; Tombs of Titian and Canova; St. 
Mark's, Doges' Palace. Evening Gondola 
Ride on the Grand Canal. 

The party for Rome diverges. This party 
remains in Venice. 

To Milan, stopping atVeroBa, to see Amphi- 
theatre, House of Capulet and Tomb of 
Juliet. 

To Turin. Grand Hotel Swiss. Evening 
drive. 

To Geneva (9 A. M. to 11 P. M.) [amid the 
Alps, passing through Mt. Cenis Tunnel 
about noon. 

In Geneva. Hotel Victoria. 

Diligence along the Arve to Chamonix. No 
luggage. 

In Chamonix. Hotel Royal. (Excursions 
may be made to the Mer de Glace, Flegere, 
Montanvert, etc., extras.) 

To Geneva. Afternoon at pleasure. 

Excursions over Lake Leman to Vevay and 
Chillon. 

To Dijon. (Luggage booked to Paris.) Hotel 
de Jura. 

To Paris. 

Rest. 

Paris. Hotel de Lille et d' Albion, 223 Rue 
St. Honore. Morning drive, passing PI. 
de la Concord, Champs Elysees, Arc de 
Triomphe, (20 min.), Pare Monceau, 
Boul. des Italiens, Porte St. Denis, Porte 
St. Martin, PI. des Vosges, PI. de la Bas- 
tile, Hotel de Ville. Afternoon at pleas- 
ure. 

Paris. The Louvre, Paintings (9-5). After- 
noon at pleasure. 

Paris. Versailles, Gardens, Palace (12-4). 

Paris. The Louvre, Sculptures. Afternoon 
at pleasiire. 

Paris. Morning drive, Notre Dame, the 
Pantheon, Statue of Ney, Gardens of the 
Luxembourg, Tomb of Napoleon (12-3). 
Paris. At pleasure. 

Paris. Rest. 
Paris. At pleasure. 
Paris. At pleasure. 



(During the ten days' stay in Paris, seven admissions to 
the Exposition are included in the ticket, and the above 
itinerary for Paris will probably be varied to suit our 
pleasure for the "World's Fair.") 

W. August 14. Via Dieppe and Brighton to London. 
Th. " 15. London. Mr. Burr's, 11 Queen Square, 
Bloomsbury. St.Paul's; the Tower, etc. 
" 16. London. The British Museum (10-6). 
Afternoon at pleasure. 



w. 


tt 


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25. 


F. 


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26. 


S. 


(( 


27 


Sun. 


CC 


28. 


M. 


tt 


29. 



T. 



30. 



W. " 31. 
T. August 1. 

F. " 2. 

S. " 3. 

Sun. " 4. 
M. " 5. 



W. 
Th. 

F. 



s. 


It 


10. 


Sim. 


it 


11. 


M. 


it 


12. 


T. 


it 


13. 



S. August 17. London. Windsor Castle. State Apart- 
ments; St. George's Chapel; Albert 
Chapel. 

Sim. " 18. London. Westminster Abbey. 

M. " 19. London. Hampton Court (10-6). After- 
noon at pleasure. 

T. " 20. London. National Gallery (10-6) ; Trafal- 
gar Square; Parliament Houses (10-4); 
Westminster Hall. 

W. " 21. London. Crystal Palace. Evening drive, 
passing the Royal Opera, Covent Gar- 
den Theatre, Drury Lane Theatre, 
the Strand, Charing Cross, St. James 
Park and Palace, Buckingham Palace 
Green Park, Wellington Arch, Apsley 
House, residence of Duke of Welling- ' 
ton, Hyde Park, Albert Memorial, 
(15 min.), Albert Hall, Kensington 
Palace, birthplace and home of Queen 
Victoria, Marble Arch. 

Th. " 22. To Glasgow. Hotel Royal. 

F. " 23. Take homeward steamer, arriving at New 
York, Sept 5. . 
SS&'lfo Night Travel. 
One more combination is available. A member may 

take route No. 4, shortening time in Paris and London, 

bo as to return Aug. 23, with Mr. B.'s party, for $525. 
The circular ticket includes all fares, hotel bills, care 

of fifty lbs. baggage, carriages, and admissions for all 

places mentioned in itinerary, fees to servants (except 

on ocean steamer), laundry bills at four places, and a 

weekly home telegram, giving location of party and health 

of each member. 
The arrangements are generous, and one will be amply 

provided if she have fifteen or twenty-five dollars in 

pocket. Payments are to be made as follows: — 

1. Ten dollars, currency, accompanying the application ; 
upon the receipt of which, the name will be entered upon 
the State-room List, and State-rooms assigned according 
to the date of entry. 

2. Ninety dollars, currency, May 1, to secure passage on 
Steamer. 

3. The balance, including the gold premium, June 10. 
Remittances may be made by draft on New York, paya- 
ble to order of C. C. Bragdon. 

Rebdtements. — Should it be found impracticable to 
make the Tour after having made the remittances, the 
money received will be refunded, less $20, iip to June 10, 
after which date, less $50. 

In event of sickness or accident at any point of the 
Tour, rendering further travel impossible, the Contract- 
Ticket may be surrendered, and a rebate of $4 per day 
will be allowed from the date of surrrender to the home- 
ward sailing date, less the value of any tickets a ctually 
purchased. 

Those wishing to remain in Europe beyond the date of 
return, may surrender the Contract-Ticket at Geneva or 
Paris, upon notice of one week, and a rebate will be 
allowed of the unpaid fares and $2 per day to the home- 
ward sailing date. 

Mr. Loomis says : "The completeness of our arrange- 
ments in general and in detail, may be inferred from the 
fact that our four last parties arrived home on the precise 
days given in the itineraries issued ten months previous." 

Letters for the party should be addressed care of Dr. 
Loomis, at the hotels specified in the itinerary, allowing 
12 days' transit to London, and 14 beyond. 

Telegrams may be sent from United States offices direct 
to the hotels designated, to within 12 hours (N. Y. time) 
of our departure as per itinerary. 

Members are furnished with a full circular of instruc- 
tion as to outfit, wardrobe, etc. 

X&~I0arly application is desirable. 



THOMAS D. 



AGENT FOR THE 



1 



: .v 



F. 



Jjfyw Jflnjjtoml ft* tymm f <*♦ 

—AND— 

CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality furnished a 

very lteasonable Kates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 




Oriental Tea Co. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Eetail Dealers in 



TEA 



5) 



And Boasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE 

The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 




SELECT NEW 

T IE .A. S 

FOR THE YERY BEST FAMILY TRADE. 



GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICE. 



Don't pay 75 cents to $1.00 per pound for the best Teas, 
when you can buy just as good for 

60 CTS. PER. POUND. 

We are now selling our very best OOLONG, JAPAN and 
ENGLISH BREAKFAST TEAS for 

60 CTS. PER POUND. 

We have selected with great care, about ONE THOU- 
SAND CHESTS from the late importations of NEW 
FORMOSA, OOLONG, JAPAN and ENGLISH BREAK- 
FAST TEAS, which are from the first pickings of the 
young and tender leaves from the Tea Gardens of China 
and Japan, and for delicacy of flavor and fullness of 
strength cannot be surpassed. 

The great reductions in the prices of Teas in Japan and 
China, and the DECLINE IN GOLD, enable us to sell the 
best Teas for 

SO CTS. PER POUND. 

If every one will just lay aside prejudice, on account 
of low prices, we will prove to any and every family in 
the New England States, who will try the above Teas, 
that they are the best sold anywhere. 

The 30 years' experience which we have had,, and 
making Teas a specialty, and the great pains taken in the 
selection of Teas, is a sufficient guarantee of satisfaction 
to all our patrons. 

C. D. COBB & BROS. 

PRINCIPAL WAREHOUSE, 

122, 126 and 128 WASHINGTON STREET, 

WITH BRANCH STORES, 

140 Hanover Street, corner Union, 1311 and 1313 Wash- 
ngton Street, 2035 Washington Street, Boston; Corner 
Main and Milk Streets, Westboro', Mass.; 145 and 147 
Main Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



7 



HBO 



5 



» 



Successors to John Hall, 



Wholesale & KeUil Dealers in 



DOORS, 

SASHES, 



BUNDS, 




MARBLEXZED SLATE 

MANTELS, 

AND SHELVES. 



•C. D. Densmore. 



177 and 183 BLACK8TONE STREET, 

(Near Haymarket Sq.,) 

BOSTON. 



C. K. Brackett. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au 
hurndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best Quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

m- All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

.T^T^IES VIOKERS, 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 



L A. ELLIOT k COMPANY, 

(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes,) 
Importers and Dealers in 

Studies, and other Works of Art, 

At Wholesale and Retail, 
Picture Frames Made to Order. 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings. 



J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 



DEALER IN 



f 



FANCY 800D 

NOTIONS, TRIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEWTON LOWER FALLS.] 

[Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 
Crockery, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Meal 8s Grain, Wholesale it Retail. 

AgencyforMme. Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

CHILDS, FULLER & CO., 

Wholesale & Retail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, LAMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &C. 

Agents for Perkins & House's Safety Lamps. 
No. 680 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

J". I5L3Sr0^7VX_jE3S cfc SONS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Qnahaugs, I'ickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FANECIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON, MASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G-. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

FRUIT AMD VEGETABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 
Cellar No. 1, New Faneiiil Hall Market, Boston 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale: 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAYLOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON". 

FEED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 

No. 9 Boylston Market, Boston. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P, 0. Address, Auburndale. 

PltOT #1 & MM1T, 

FASHIONABLE 37 West Street, 



STATIONERS, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Envelopes are 
elegaLt and inexpensive. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 




J^riist photographer, 



Has Removed to 



493 WASHINGTON ST., 



Up one flight, between Temple Place and West Street, 
where, in his elegant rooms and with increased facilities, 
he will be enabled to guarantee perfect satisfaction, at 
the lowest prices. 



[Established 1847.] 

AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST„ BOSTON. 



riatumercantl 



tantt: 



oott f(anujactuttrs 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAT. 

FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Artliti' MttuUli 

Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 

BOSTON. 



8 



LA SELL LEA VE S 



Grand Educational Excursion 



To Europe, in the summer of 1878, visiting Ireland 
Scotland, England, France, Belgium, the Rhine, Prussia 
Switzerland, Italy, and the Paris Exposition. 

All objectionable features incident to European travel 
Entirely Removed. 

Return Tickets good twelve months. 

College Professors, Teachers of Music and Literature' 
Art Students, School Teachers, and others of like tastes 
please address, for prospectus, 

E. TOURJEE, 

Music Hall, Boston. 

Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



m/tass Photographic 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PH0VISI01T STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fkesh Vegetables in their season. 

4®=* Goods delivered free of charge. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 

A.X WHOLESALE AUTO KETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & HOWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Painter)*' $upplie£, SftisV ]VIkterikl^ 

AND 

ARCHIIECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



SWAN «Sc NEWTON, 

dealers in 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENEY SWAN. Mrt«Tr»tir 

S. B. NEWTON. BOSTON. 

HENRY F. MILLER, 



BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

BR@©KT@N), MASS. 
Wholesale and Eetail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINEET AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AT THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

"WEST NEWTON _A.3SrXJ AtTBUKNDALB, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FRANK WOOD, 

STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 

Nearly opposite Broinfield Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

JOSEPH ■W. G-ZE=lI<3-<3-, 

Manufacturer of and Sealer in Enameled Slate 

11ITLES 111 BlieilT SHELVES, ETC* 

Also, English. Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Farlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromneld 

street, .Boston, Mass. 

THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Fasts and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMTIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New F. H. Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

NICHOLS cfe; H^^IjIIi, 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Eromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 

^W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

HUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

"ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

G. HENRY HARPPN, 

Dealer in 

H@@i s 9 ibtes <& MwM$bwwm 

BEPAIEING PE0MPTL7 ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS, 



L0CKW00D, BROOKS & CO., 



Jjublfefora, 



ioofeettfl$ and Stationery 



381 Washington St., Boston. 
Dealers in all kinds of 

SCHOOL, TEXT BOOKS, 

And Books in every department of Literature. Plain 
and Fancy Stationery in the greatest variety. Artistic 
Designing and Engraving specialty. Fine Printing 
executed in the best style. 

4ST Correspondence solicited. ^& 

THOMAS HALL, 

MANUFACTURING ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 

Telegraphical, Philosophical, Mathematical, Optical 

Galvanic, and Chemical Instruments 

of all Descriptions. 

Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Eromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. S<» Hall's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



^D¥EHfI&E«S 




Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 



INFORMATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisine 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



lO.PANS^52VltelNGTONST:BoSTON 



[From Paine's Illustrated Price-List. 




No. 5. 



PL|l|i^^!llll^3l II 
fcjcfp ll Mjjjjjlijplffi 

i ^lMM||BlMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|lllll|IIIH 
No. 10. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide 
French Burl Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 

No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY, 

Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 

No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Canal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





TDTJ^SL IF'IEIVLinxr^. ZE^^OTI. 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE. MASS., APRIL, 1878. 



Number 7. 




JOHN H. PRAY, SON S & CO. 

We have just received our Spring Stock of 

CHINA and JAPANESE 

STRAW 

MATTINGS, 

embracing a large and line assortment of white, check, and 
many fancy patterns, in all qualities, and at prices to com- 
pare with the times. All of these Mattings arc made from 
" Fkesii Grass," and all were imported this spring. We 
can offer superior inducements to those furnishing 

SUMMER COTTAGES, 

either in the country, or at the shore, as we have made 
specially large purchases, and can therefore afford to 
sell very much under the market rates. 



ORIENTAL RUGS! 

We have also a fine collection of such varieties of Rugs 
as are usually laid on Mattings. Among the most expen- 
sive are, of course, the 

Smyrna, 
Indian, 
Persian, 



WHILE THE 



Geordez, 
Coula, 
Scinde, 

and others at less prices, make a beautiful appearance 
is hen laid on a fresh, white matting. In smaller rugs, 
tqe 

LAZAR RUG, 

of Scotch manufacture, is most used, as it is moderate in 
price and very durable, — certainly two desirable charac- 
teristics. We would respectfully invite you to examine 
our stock before purchasing elsewhere. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & GO,, 

558 & 560 

WASHINGTON ST., - BOSTON. 



A gentleman who has long been man- 
aging trustee of a school for boys and 
giils in Sherwood, N. Y., says that in 
former years the girls outnumbered the 
boys, but that since the pressure in finan- 
cial matters, the attendance of the former 
has largely fallen off. Parents still hold 
the idea that boys must have the lion's 
share of the good things. — Auburn ( N. 
Y.) Journal. 

Forsooth, while John sits in his pleas- 
antly-furnished room at Yale or Harvard, 
with his feet on the table, a cigar in his 
mouth, and a dime novel in his hands, 
struggling up the hill of knowledge, or 
talking about " the thing," Mary at home, 
in the family sewing-room, turning her last 
year's suit to make it look more respecta- 
ble, and stealing a few moments now and 
then to glance at some treasured work of 
science or literature at her side, is envying 
brother John his opportunities to cultivate 
his talents, and thinking how proud she 
shall be when some day he is a great and 
learned man. He comes home worn out 
with late suppers and much dissipation, 
and says that he is tired out with work — 
" The Profs, don't have any mercy on a 
fellow," etc. She pets him, and says he 
must not work too hard, and wishes she 
could help him, as she did when they were 
in school together, and she worked all his 
problems in Algebra, and translated all his 
Latin and Greek for him. He pats her 
condescendingly on the shoulder, calls her 
a little goose, and after talking wisely 
about things of which he knows nothing, 
and giving her some of his clothes to mend, 
goes off to ask the " governor" for an extra 
allowance. But John must be educated, 
for John can enter a profession, and Mary 
can't, you know. Education doesn't amount 
to much for a girl, anyway. Now even if 
a man doesn't enter a profession, after 
graduating with an average two per cent 
above the standard, and settles down as a 
money-seeker, never reading anything be- 
side the accounts of stocks and exchanges 
in the daily papers — even if this is all his 
thought, still it is a good thing for him to 
have a college education. He needs it ; 
its discipline will help him in his life-work. 
But if his wife had the same education, 
what good would it do her ? 



If you have a certain amount to spend 
upon the education of your children, give 
it all to j'-our son, and furnish the mind of 
your daughter with nothing which shall 
give it strength, and let her either ruin her 
health and lose her spirits in the endeavor 
to master by herself what she so much de- 
sires, or let her turn her attention to socie- 
ty, and become a thoughtless butterfly, in- 
tent on nothing but her own gratification, 
and fitted to make no home a happy place. 
Now doesn't Mary need something to sat- 
isfy the cravings of her mind, just as much 
as John ? Doesn't she need something to 
widen her views of life, to ripen the powers 
given to her ? In fact, something to make 
her a more fit and helpful companion to 
John, if not to herself? For in this life, 
each of us must be his own most intimate 
companion. 

Why should she care for it ? That is 
not the question ; but, if you will, she cares 
for it because it is an implanted principle 
of her nature, which you might have seen 
from the time when Mary and John went to 
school together. After the recitations 
were over they walked home in company ; 
but when they reached they gate, he said : 
" Here, Mol, take my books ; I am going to 
play ball with the other boys," and disap- 
peared till supper-time. Mary, however, 
took his books and went into the house, 
where, after practicing an hour or two, she 
sat by her mother's side and learned how 
to mend the clothes John was wearing-out. 
Now you love your daughter as much as 
you love your son, and desire to make her 
life a happy one ; but you have heard that 
girls have no need of an education beyond 
that given by the common schools, and 
that their health will not allow of their ad- 
vancing farther. Now as to the matter of 
health : It has been sufficiently proved 
in the past that girls, as well as boys, can 
study without injuring themselves, and the 
fact is, that a smaller number of girls die 
from hard study than from the demands of 
fashionable life. Do you wonder your 
daughter's health gives out when she sits 
in the house and sews, sews, sews, from 
morning till night ? It is not strange our 
women are nervous invalids. 

Your daughter may lead a solitary life. 



2 



LA SELL LEA VE S. 



The traditional oak may fail the vine. In 
that case, doesn't she need something to fill 
the vacant hours, to make life a pleasure, 
instead of a wearisome thing? And where 
will she find better companions than the 
master spirits of the past ? The support 
of her life may fail her after she has been 
protected by a stronger arm through all the 
years of her maidenhood. Would you, then, 
have her swell the already crowded ranks 
of seamstresses and factory-girls ? or would 
you enable her to provide for herself in 
some other way, and by strengthening her 
understanding and judgment, and giving 
her some knowledge of laws and business 
regulation, make her independent and self- 
reliant? So shall your daughter be happy, 
and return to you the reward of your toil 
by making your homo a dwelling of light. 



Those who listened to Prdf. Putnam's 
interesting lecture on Ceramic Art, last 
year, may be pleased to hear of the follow- 
ing little incident connected with his lec- 
ture on the same subject, delivered in Bath, 
Me. During his stay in that city, he was 
the guest of Mayor Reed. Oa the morning 
of his departure, Prof. Putnam suddenly 
missed his hat. As it could not be found, 
Mr. Reed offered him his own, and after 
many protestations, Prof. Putnam accepted 
it. The following extract from a letter 
published in the Balh Daily Times, tells its 
own story : 

Jamaica Plain, Boston, Feb. 18, 1878. 

My Dear Sir: — Our sudden exit from 
your hospitable mansion last Friday morn- 
ing, under such peculiar circumstances, 
was an event not to be forgotten, or passed 
over in silence. 

It was pregnant with great lessons that 
should be recorded for the benefit of pos- 
terity. On my arrival at the station, I 
found myself the subject of the most polite, 
not to say obsequious attention, from the 
railroad officials in general, and the ticket- 
master in particular. 

This unusual attention, so entirely unex- 
pected, staggered me for a moment ; but 
the next instant it was all clear — they 
recognized the hat. The Mayor's hat, even, 
commanded their respect. "All right," 
said I to myself; and I straightened up an 
inch at least, and tried to look very wise, 
and did not disgrace myself by asking if 
they had any " bricks " that would do to 
put in it. As I took my seat in the cars, 
the "observed of all observers," I said, 
mentally, " Fine feathers make fine birds." 



"Ah," thought I, as my back-bone straight- 
ened, "'some men are born great, some 
achieve greatness, and some have greatness 
thrust upon them.' " 

That hat — why, it just opened wide every 
door I approached. It loaded me down 
with rare specimens of Ceramic Art, old 
and new. 

When I arrived at home, that same head- 
piece secured me a warm welcome, with 
the exclamation, " Why, father, how well 
you look in your new hat. Where did you 
get it ? How very becoming it is ! " At 
church it was just the same. Neighbors 
greeted with unusual warmth, as they 
glanced at my new chapeau ; and while I 
tried to put on an air of unconsciousness, 
and attend to the service with " meek and 
unaffected grace, " I was inwardly rejoicing 
over my sudden increase of popularity, and 
my church meditating ran something on 
this wise : This hat will last a year or two, 
if I am careful. And then I began to work 
a problem. If two days give so much, 
what will two years give ? Answer, May- 
oralty, Governorship, or White House. 

But the scene suddenly shifts, and now I 
see the unsheltered locks of the Head of 
Bath on that inclement morning. We see 
him, with a red bandanna around his brow, 
stealing down some back street in search 
of the nearest hat-store. 

He is recognized by a neighbor, who in- 
quires in breathless haste what has hap- 
pened. Mean, sneaking entry-thieves have 
had the audacity to enter the domicile of his 
honor ! The news flies — the papers are out 
with the startling announcement. The 
police are on the alert. We tremble for 
our safety, and so propose, now and here, 
to compromise the matter if possible. We 
would not part with that hat for all the 
wealth of Bath, for that would be to loose 
all the honors and emoluments that we see 
just within our grasp ; but to keep the 
Maine police out of our way, and still hold 
that hat, we have, after much deliberation, 
sent you another tile. It may be rather 
light for the season, but summer will soon 
be here. You will also observe that the 
fur is on the inside — that is the latest style. 
You remarked that it "would be all the 
same a hundred years hence" when that 
fellow ran off with yours, you remember, 
and we have tried to send you one that 
will last that time, if it meets with no mis- 
hap. A hundred years hence ! Yes, we 
will hope that the great grandchildren will 
look upon it with fond memory of the sac- 
rifice and generosity of their revered pro- 
genitor, and that your name will be associ- 



ated in fond remembrance with the heroes 
of Pemaquid. 

Yours, most gratefully, 

B. W. P. 
The "tile" referred to above accompa- 
nying the letter, was a beautiful flower hat 
of china or porcelain, with a kitten of same 
material peeping out over the brim. 



iMteiij. 

Died, at the tender age of three months, 
of an unknown disease, the D. S. Society. 

It was with great regret that we heard 
of the above-mentioned calamity, for the 
talent exhibited by this society made it 
indeed a marvel of precocity, and its loss 
is greatly mourned by the members of the 
school, especially by the S. D. Society, 
which believes heartily in the spirit of 
friendly opposition evinced by this prodigy 
on all occasions. 

Instituted for the purpose of having a 
" good time," its career was short, and we 
fear it undertook literary efforts too gigan- 
tic for its youthful strength. We would 
advise all to take warning from its sad fate. 
As before stated, the S. D. Society mourns 
the loss of its young sister to the literary 
and educational world, and hopes its suc- 
cessor, if it has one, will be longer lived. 



m. MUM OM 

The walls of our Chapel have not for a 
long time re-echoed to such melodious 
strains as filled it on the evening of April 
3d, when the classical concert, under the 
direction of our highly-esteemed teacher 
of instrumental music, Prof. Hills, took 
place. The concert opened with two move- 
ments from Mozart's Concerto in D minor, 
played by Miss Palmer, a pupil of Prof. 
Hills, in Boston. The orchestral accom- 
paniment was played by Prof. Hills, on the 
second piano. Miss Palmer played in a 
manner worthy of her teacher, with good 
execution and a fine touch. Miss L. F. 
Kimball, also of Boston, then favored us 
with a good rendering of " Core Com- 
pagne," by Bellini. Miss Kimball's execu- 
tion is truly remarkable. She sings the 
most difficult passages abounding in trills 
and chromatic runs, with the greatest ease 
and agility. Prof. Hills rendered three 
selections. "Gavotte," by Stiehl ; "Viola 
Melodie," Thalberg ; and "Waltz Ca" 
price," by Fausig ; and after a recall 
played a charming morceau of his own 



LA SELL LEA VE S. 



composition. Prof. Hills played in his 
usually admirable style, with musical touch, 
clearness and precision. Miss Kimball 
then sang the "Nightingale's Trill," by 
Ganz, and as an encore, " My Heart Is 
Thy Home." The concert closed with the 
"Adagio" and "Finale" from Mendelssohn, 
Concerto No. 2, finely rendered by Prof. 
Hills, accompanied on the second piano by 
Miss Palmer. The rich-toned Weber piano 
so kindly furnished by the Boston ageney, 
added not a little to ' the success of the 
evening. 



"Miss Marianne Farningham recently 
delivered a lecture in London on the sub- 
ject of women. Miss Farningham said 
there was a class of modern girls who 
might well go under the name of gentle- 
manly young ladies. They parted their 
hair on one side; they imitated their broth- 
ers collars and cravats ; they had their 
jackets made at the tailors, and instead of 
calling them jackets, they wore ' coats ; ' 
they spoke a kind of slang which was unbe- 
coming in them ; they were clever at 
whistling. ' I have been told,' said the 
lecturer, ' that they go so far as to smoke 
cigarettes, and they often say they wish 
they were men.' The girls are not the 
only offenders in this respect. There are 
young men who part their hair in the mid- 
dle, and pride themselves on the whiteness 
of their hands." — Sunday Herald. 

Yes, indeed ; and we came to the conclu- 
sion some time ago, that if there is anything 
in the world that will make a woman want 
to be a man, just to show what a man should 
be, it is to see the almost nonentities which 
pass for men sometimes. We recall one 
of these interesting and numerous speci- 
mens which we saw once in the cars : hair 
parted in the middle ; white hands, on 
which he frequently cast glances of admir- 
ation ; a fan attached to his wrist; and he 
was making feeble attempts from behind 
his collar to read " Red as a Rose is She," 
or some equally instructive work, persist- 
ently staring at every young lady who ap- 
proached, and pronouncing the world a 
decided bore. It might be said with cer- 
tainty, that the question "to be or not to 
be," had been decided in the negative for 
him — not by him, for he was evidently 
incapable of deciding either way. 



With pistol practice at Princeton, hazing 
at Dartmouth, and skirmishing all along 
the line of New England Colleges, American 
youths are now acquiring the rudiments of 
a military education. 



Sehoei fiik 

The cloud which has rested upon the 
faces of the Juniors for so long, was lifted 
on the evening of March 19th ; but, alas, it 
did not pass away altogether, but has set- 
tled down upon the Seniors in even deeper 
gloom, while any mention of Commencement 
brings such a look of despair, that the 
spectator hastens to change the subject. 

One of the members of the Sophomore 
class wishes the announcement to be made, 
that if a rent is discovered in any of her 
garments, she may have written and private 
notice, and not have her feelings outraged 
by a public declaration and demonstration 
of the fact. 

We were very sorry to part with Misses 
Haskell and Curtis, and we will not soon 
forget how much they have contributed to 
the pleasure of our school life. The black 
dresses and sad faces of their friends testi- 
fied to the sorrow felt at their departure, as 
did the mourning ribbon tied to the door- 
knob of their respective apartments. The 
S. D.'s are disconsolate at losing so much 
valuable talent from their debates. 

We were all sorry to lose Miss Ida Hull 
from among our number. She will be very 
much missed, but kindly remembered. 
The Misses Burnham, also, have left us, 
and we bade them " good-bye " with much 
regret. 

Miss Carrie Kendig has returned to us, 
very much improved in health and spirits 
by her visit home. We were especially 
glad to welcome her back for the Junior 
exhibition, for we cannot spare any of our 
Juniors. 

What means these secret conclaves 
which engage so much of the Seniors' 
attention? Whispers of "Class Day" 
and " Essays " salute our ears at every turn, 
and visions of white slippers, fans and 
flowers, announce that the Commencement 
fever is in the air. 

We were pleased to receive a call the 
other day from Mrs. Fuller, formerly known 
as Miss Fannie Shillaber, class of '74. 
It is very pleasant to see old pupils among 
us, and we are glad to have them keep up 
their interest in their Alma Mater. 

The days, and even hours, were counted 
before going home for the Fast Day vaca- 
tion. A few of our girls, however, were 
more on the shady side than otherwise, as 
they saw so many going home and leaving 
them to thoughts of their own homes farther 
away. 



We have a compensation for our losses 
this term, in the acquisition to our number, 
of Misses Ellis, Howard, and Wiswall. 
We welcome them most heartily, and hope 
their stay among us may be a pleasant one . 

The last election of officers of the S. D. 
Society resulted as follows : President, 
Miss Bailey ; Vice-President, Miss Fergu- 
son ; Secretary, Miss Balch ; Treasurer, 
Miss Converse; Critic, Miss Potter; Usher, 
Miss Linscott. 

We are all glad to see Miss Mattie Ran- 
som's bright face among us again, and hope 
she will have no more occasion to absent 
herself from our midst this term. 

Owing to the kindness of Dr. and Mrs. 
Latimer, of Auburndale, the evening of 
March 26 will long be preserved in the 
memories of some of Lasell's young 
women, as one of the pleasantest reminis- 
cences of this school year. They were in- 
vited to meet Dr. Latimer's class of Theo- 
logues just graduated from Boston Univer- 
sity, and all unite in extending sincere 
thanks to the host and hostess for the en- 
joyment of the evening. 

Mr. Bragoon has been away for a few 
weeks, and we are glad to see him again, for 
school is lonely without him. 

Miss Nellie Chamberlayne, of Utica, one 
of our former pupils, has been spending 
several enjoyable weeks in Washington this 
spring. 



For the Arithmetic class : — She was a 
little girl who wasn't fond of her arithmetic. 
She took it into her head to read the Bible, 
and beginning with the account of the 
creation, she got along very well for a 
while, but suddenly threw the book down, 
saying, "There, I don't want to read any 
more of it." " Why, what's the matter ? ' 
asked her mamma. " Because they had to 
study arithmetic there," was the reply. 
" Just hear this: ' And the Lord commanded 
them to multiply on the face of the earth.' ' 
And there was no more Bible for her. — Ex. 

Oh! when will Freshmen change from green, 

To some more brilliant hue? 
Oh ! when will Sophomores cease to tell 

Professors what to do ? 
Oh ! when will Juniors quit the girls. 

And act like little men? 
Oh ! when will Seniors all agree 

On class elections? When? 

— Rochester Campus. 

"For what was Caesar noted?" asked a 
teacher of his class. "He et tu brutes," 
shouted a small boy at the top of his voice. 



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lift 



n 



One would think, to hear the amount of 
complaining which constantly goes on 
everywhere, that there were a good many 
people who would like to take affairs into 
their own hands, and arrange this world to 
suit themselves. 

Suppose some of them could have their 
wish, and obtain the management of things 
for a while; what would be the result? 
Perfect chaos, it seems to us. Why, just 
take that much-abused, but ever-fruitful 
topic, the weather; and if everyone could 
have his way in regard to it, we should 
have a supply of that commodity exceeding 
Mark Twain's description, in both quantity 
and diversity. Lowell puts it in a way 
that makes us feel like saying, "There is 
more truth than poetry in it," without ever 
hinting that the poetry is anything but 
good, either. 

The fact is, we are too much like the 
little boy who, after fussing about every- 
thing he could think of, and being finally 



prevailed upon to cease his fretting, sud- 
denly burst into tears again, because 
the cat ran across the floor with her tail 
up in the air, when it would probably 
have produced, the same effect if her 
tail had been hanging down. We try so 
hard to consider things as having happened 
merely out of spite to us, and change our 
opinions so that things must clash with 
them, that we become in time a la Mrs. 
Gummidge — "poor, lone creeturs, with 
whom everything goes contrairy." There 
are very few who do not see this fault 
plainly enough in others, and we all know 
how uncomfortable we are made to feel by 
those people who are always finding some- 
thing wrong in their treatment ; but we do 
not "see ourselves as others see us," and 
so we go on, with a habit growing on us 
which will maks us and every one around 
us unhappy. This is one of the greatest 
points in our plan of self-government here ; 
and it may justly be so regarded, for it is 
one of the most important in our self- 
government all through life. 

Pupils put themselves voluntarily in a 
position where, for the good of all con- 
cerned, if not of themselves alone, they 
must give up some privileges which they 
would have if at their own homes. We 
say again, it is a voluntary act ; and yet 
pupils complain because they are deprived 
of these things, and find fault because they 
cannot be suited in everything. But sup- 
pose the desire of each one in a certain 
direction were to be gratified ; in a class 
of fifty individuals, how many would have 
just the same opinion on any subject? 
Chaos would again be the result, and a 
diversity of plans which would cause more 
collisions in recitations than we have ever 
had yet. 

It is the thought of this plan of govern- 
ment which is being brought to perfection 
in our school — to give privileges to those 
who show themselves worthy of confidence 
and trust ; and one great fault to be over- 
come before confidence can be placed or 
privileges given, is the habit of looking at 
things in an unfavorable light, and of ex- 
pressing too freely opinions contrary to 
those uttered by others who are supposed 
to know more on some subjects than we do. 
" But," says one, " cannot we think as we 
choose ? Must we have no freedom of 
mind or opinion?" Certainly we must; 
freedom of opinion is something to be cul- 
tivated. But the trouble is, we get the idea 
that freedom in that respect consists in 
always thinking differently from others. 
The idea is, and it is surely an excellent 



one, to develop our self-control, especially 
in regard to our expression of thought ; for 
he who cannot bridle his tongue is not 
master of himself, and too often brings him- 
self to grief by indulgence in bitter or 
fault-finding remarks. " No talent, no self- 
denial, no brains, no character, are required 
to set up in the grumbling business. But 
those who are moved by a genuine desire 
to do good, have little time for murmuring 
or complaint." 



Our cabinet recently received some very 
valuable and beautiful additions, in the 
form of corals, shells, etc. — a present from 
Rev. B. F. Snow, of Auburndale. The 
members of the Geology class were in rap- 
tures over the corals, varying from branches 
of deep red to delicate pink sprays, and 
white tufts, as light and feathery as moss ; 
bivalves, ranging in size from the tiniest 
shell, hardly thicker than paper, to the large 
ones with their rough, dark outsides and 
pearly white interiors ; many specimens of 
cyprsea and coni, some of which are the 
most exquisite we have ever seen. We most 
heartily thank Mr. Snow for his thoughtful 
kindness, and suggest that the friends of 
the institution present us with a cabinet 
especially for shells. 



" Mirage " is the newest of the No Name 
Series, which has been so deservedly pop- 
ular this season. It is by the author of 
" Kismet," but shows more experience and 
finish, both in style and in character-draw- 
ing. 

Like "Kismet," " Mirage" is a history 
of the adventures of a party of travellers in 
the East ; though the scene of the former is 
laid in Egypt, and on the waters of the 
Nile, while the latter describes the Holy 
Land. 

The descriptions in both books make one 
long more than ever to visit these historic 
and sacred lands ; but those in " Mirage " 
seem particularly true and natural. The 
characters in the book are very clearly 
drawn ; one in particular, that of Constance, 
the heroine of the story, is very pathetic 
and beautiful, because of its simplicity. 
The author seems to linger over the details 
of this girl's character, to give her words 
and thoughts as if she loved her ; and the 
book inspires in the reader something of the 
same tenderness. 



L A S E L L LEA V E S, 



LlStBM. 

Miss Parloa's cooking lectures are more 
interesting each time, and our girls are be- 
coming real enthusiastic in the culinary 
department. One cannot help admiring 
the swiftness and neatness with which she 
performs her work, and nothing could be 
prettier than the calico dress and white 
apron which she wears. On the afternoon 
of April 7 th, the bill of fare was extremely 
appetizing, and many were the rash resolves 
made by the young women to indulge in 
potato souffle as soon as they reached home. 
In our mind's eye, we can see some of them 
arrayed in bewitching cambric dresses and 
white aprons, descending to the kitchen 
and informing Bridget that they were 
about to share her honors. Then we think 
we see the distress of pater familias when 
he is called upon to devour the dainties set 
before him. But we are coming soon to 
bread-muffins and coffee — that will be the 
crowning point of our glory ; and when the 
lectures are through, we expect to have 
mastered knowledge enough to make our 
name and fame in this line, if in no other. 



Those who attended the course of lec- 
tures on European cities, delivered by Mr. 
Stoddard at the Seminary last year, doubt- 
less remember those on Paris, which were 
very interesting. Indeed, we came to con- 
sider ourselves as quite well acquainted 
with the French metropolis ; but after 
the one which he gave at West Newton, 
and which was illustrated by the- stere- 
opticon, we feel as if we had really been 
there ; for. the beautiful pictures of the 
Boulevarde, with its crowds of fashionable 
carriages ; the Place de la Concorde, with 
its fountain and ancient obelisk ; the pal- 
aces of the Tuilleries, the Louvre, and the 
Luxembourg ; the Cathedral of Notre Dame, 
and a host of others, were so natural, that 
when the lecture was finished and the 
lights turned up, we could hardly under- 
stand how we had been so quickly trans- 
ported from a foreign land. In commenc- 
ing, Mr. S. gave a very instructive and 
interesting sketch of the history of Paris, 
from which we learned that its advance to 
its present well-known condition of beauty 
and cleanliness has been quite rapid. In 
such a hurried survey of buildings, there 
was, of course, little time for a look at 
their interiors ; but we had a peep into the 
elegant dining-hall of the Grand Hotel, and 
from the sighs which followed its disap- 
pearance from the screen, we think most of 
the audience would have enjoyed a longer 



stay. We had hardly dared to hope for a 
sight at any of the beautiful things in the 
art galleries of the Louvre, and there was 
a mingling of surprise with delight when 
we saw before us the image of the Venus 
de Milo, the clear white of its marble dis- 
tinctly marked against the crimson hang- 
ings back of it. The description of the 
statue was very fine, combining many clas- 
sical allusions with a clear idea of its 
characteristics. By the way, we think Mr. 
Stoddard's expression of the difference be- 
tween the Venus de Milo and the Venus de 
Medici is good — that the latter represents 
merely a, beautiful woman, while the former 
is the figure of a goddess. After a descrip- 
tion of the crypt in which lies the body of 
Napoleon, a picture of his statue was 
shown, and the lecture closed with a touch- 
ing tribute to him who, once the master of 
the world, died far from the scenes of his 
triumph, with the request on his lips to be 
buried in Paris. 

The course of lectures at West Newton 
ended March 27th, with a very enjoyable 
one on " Cairo, the Magnificent." This 
plan of illustrating the descriptions — by 
means of the stereopticon — has greatly in- 
creased the interest of the lectures ; for 
with a picture before one, a much better 
idea can be obtained than would ever come 
from a mere description, however well it 
might be given. 



We are glad to accord a place to the 
Dickinson Liberal among our exchanges, 
for it takes first rank among them. It has 
many little articles which we think might 
prove helpful hints to some outside the 
Dickinson Seminary, for whose students 
they were intended — articles calling at- 
tention to little faults about which students 
are apt to be careless. This is one of the 
peculiarly good features of the paper. 

The Oberlin Review for March, contains 
a fine article on the " Influence of Doubt," 
and also another interesting essay on 
"American Mythology." It's exchange 
column is very spicy. We have not seen 
any better review of the "Crimson," than 
that published in the Oberlin Review. 

The March number of the University 
Beacon, fully sustains its high reputation 
among college papers. It contains good 
articles on the "Cynicism of Culture" and 
the "Spirit of Criticism," besides two 
pleasantly written articles, the one entitled 
"My Picture Gallery," the other, "Jack 
and Gill." 



There is a little paper published at a little 
school in Iowa, which modestly suggests 
that the Leaves would be " improved by a 
little more heavy literary matter." We 
take occasion to thank our young friend 
for her opinion. While there may be a 
difference of opinion whether more "heavy 
matter," such as it gives its readers, would 
add anything to the Leaves, we do not 
mention that, but content ourselves with 
remarking that of its eight pages, only 
three are devoted to what it probably calls 
"heavy literary" matter, while part of that 
is an extract from a report on education 
(thanks for the hint, there are several vol- 
umes in our library), and remind ourselves 
that there are a good many people who 
can't run much themselves, but can make 
a good deal of noise in "hurrahing" the 
racers on. We'll take the encouragement 
so kindly given, and — do as we think 
best! 

The Trinity Tablet for April, has just 
come to hand, and is by no means a blank 
tablet, for it contains a fine parallel between 
Faust and Hamlet. The illustration on page 
42, is one of the finest specimens of college 
art we have ever seen. 

The Exonian, published by the students 
of Phillip's Exeter Academy, is very good 
for so small a sheet. We are somewhat 
amazed at the following, however : "Young 
ladies on entering Wellesley, are received 
by a committee from the Sophomore class, 
who conduct them to their rooms, help 
them unpack, show them over the 
grounds and college buildings, decorate 
their rooms with flowers, and continue their 
kind attentions until the new-comers feel 
at home. But then, they are young ladies." 
We should like to ask if courtesy isn't as 
desirable a quality in a true gentleman as 
a lady. It seems to be the opinion of col- 
legiates that to be manly, is to be rude and 
unfeeling — to delight in hazing, and other 
such amusements. 

School Days, published by the New- 
ton High School, promises very fairly. 
Our advice to its publisher is to press on, 
always remembering that "there is room 
higher up " 

"Maiden meditations, fancy free," is 
rather an odd motto for the paper of a gen- 
tleman's college. However, notwithstand- 
ing its avowed purpose, the Monthly Mus- 
ings of Richmond College prove to be very 
entertaining. The February number con- 
tains a fine article on the " Relation of 
Mental Development to Ambition." 



6 



LASELL LEAVES. 



The Aurora comes a long way from the 
Iowa Agricultural College, but is none the 
less interesting on account of this. We 
are glad to place it among our exchanges. 



Gail Hamilton says : " It is the first 
duty of a woman to be a lady. Good 
breeding is good sense. Bad manners in 
woman is immorality. Awkwardness may 
be ineradicable. Bashfulness is constitu- 
tional. Ignorance of etiquette is the result 
of circumstances. All can be condoned, 
and do not banish man or woman from the 
amenities of their kind. But self-possessed, 
unshrinking and aggressive coarseness of 
demeanor may be reckoned as a State 
prison offence, and certainly merits that 
mild form of restraint called imprisonment 
for life. It is a shame for women to be 
lectured on their manners : it is a bitter 
shame that they need it . To be a lady, is 
more than to be a prince. A lady is always, 
in her right, inalienably worthy of respect. 
The natural sentiment of man towards 
woman is reverence. He loses a large 
means of grace, when he is obliged to 
account her a being to be trained into pro- 
priety. A man's ideal is not wounded 
when a woman fails in worldly wisdom ; 
but if in grace, in tact, in sentiment, in 
delicacy, in kindness, she should be found 
wanting, he receives an inward hurt." 



StltcAIsii. 

It is a noble and a great thing to cover 
the blemishes and excuse the failings of a 
friend ; to draw a curtain before his stains, 
and to display his perfections ; to bury his 
weaknesses in silence, but to proclain his 
virtues on the house-top. — South. 

The night has a thousand eyes, — 

The day but one ; 
Yet the light of the bright world dies 

With the dying sun. 

The mind has a thousand eyes, 

And the heart but one ; 
Yet the light of the whole life dies 

When love is done. 

The love of the true, the beautiful, and 
the good, with the aspiration to attain 
them as a personal possession, forms the 
ideal of a complete man. — Ruskin. 

A common book will often give you much 
amusement ; but it is only a noble book 
which will give you dear friends. 



Nothing unites people like companion- 
ship in intellectual enjoyment. It does 
more — it gives them mutual respect, and 
to each among them self-respect, that 
corner stone of all virtue. — Sir John Her- 
schel. 

There is a bright side to everything, 

even to March dust — 

A peck of March dust, and a shower in May, 
Make the corn green, and the fields gay. 

— English Proverb. 

The Free Press maliciously suggests that 
if "women hold up their dresses to show 
their skirts, why not cut the dresses off 
above the bottom of the skirts, and thus 
save cloth and vexation ? " Ah, yes, dear 
Lewis, and why not go farther, and suggest 
that the young man with a cardinal red 
silk pocket handkerchief have his outside 
pocket made of glass, so that he could dis- 
play the goods without getting them 
dusty ? — Burlington Hawkeye. 

Dean Swift was applied to at a late hour 
of a stormy night, after he had gone to bed, 
by a runaway couple, to be married. He 
answered the call from his upper chamber 
window. He told them he was undressed, 
the weather very threatening, and they, he 
presumed, were in a hurry — he would marry 
them as they stood, and after asking them 
the necessary questions, said : 

"Under this window, in stormy weather, 
I marry this man and woman together: 
Let none hut Him who rules the thunder 
Put this man and woman asunder." 

Something on the "tramp" question: — 
"You haven't got such a thing as a pair 
of old trousers, have you ? " " No, my 
man," said the merchant, " I don't keep 
my wardrobe in my counting-house. " 
" Where do you live ? " rejoined the man, 
"and I'll call in the morning for the old 
pair you've got on." — Ex. 

The Rome Sentinel constitutes itself a 
new Diogenes, and is evidently unsuccess- 
ful in its search, for it says : " An honest 
man is the most lonesome work of the 
Creator." 

It is well for a woman when no work 
seems too hard or too small, — when she is 
able to forget herself, and to live entirely 
in others. — Goethe. 

It was an Irish coroner who, when asked 
how he accounted for an extraordinary 
mortality in Limerick, replied sadly, "I 
cannot tell. There are people dying this 
year that never died before." 

They that do nothing, are in the readiest 
way to that which is worse than nothing. 



About the time barometers became so 
cheap as to induce agriculturalists to pur- 
chase them, a farmer in Kilbride having 
been persuaded to become the possessor of 
the instrument, on one occasion, in spite of 
a raising barometer, it continued raining. 
The farmer, losing all patience, carried the 
instrument to the door, held it up towards 
the sky, and exclaimed, "In the name 'o 
guidness, will ye no believe your ain een ?" 

The spirit of the following might apply 
to some of us : 

"Ye Senior sitteth upon ye fence, 
And pondereth all ye time 
Whence to obtain ye pounds and pence, 
To square ye bills 'berime.' " 



11 to 



AGENT FOB THE 



1 



—AND— 

CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 

very Seasonable Kates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 

100 Dollars Saved, 

IS A HUNDRED DOLLARS EARNED. 



Every family can save from 

FIFTY TO ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS 

Every year, by buying their TEAS and Family 

Stores at 

C. D. COBB & BRO'S. 

GROCERY AND TEA HOUSE. 

We are confident that every one will be convinced that 
the above statement is true by a little calculation, after 
comparing our prices with those they are paying at other 
places. 

GOODS DELIVERED 

FREE OF CHARGE. 

All orders for Twenty-Five Dollars and 
upwards, for a general assortment of goods, 
shipped at one time and directed to one 
person, or a club of several families, will 
be CAREFULLY packed and delivered by 
freight at the DEPOT in the place where 
they reside, provided it is within One Hun- 
dred Miles of Boston, 
FIRIBE OF OZETAIRGKE. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DENS 



Wholesale & Retail Dealers In 

DOORS, 

SASHES, 



* 



Successors to John Hall, 



BLINDS, 




MARBLEIZED SLATE 

MANTELS, 

AND SHELVES. 



177 and 183 BLACKiSTONE STREET, 

(Near Haymarket Sq.,) 
C. D. Densmore. B O S T O KT . C. K - Brackett- 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
hnrndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
w ill sell at the lowest prices. 

»se- All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DOft'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

JAMES VIOKBRS, 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 

L A. ELLIOT k COMPANY, 

(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes.) 
Importers and Dealers In 

Studies, and other Works of Art, 

At Wholesale and Retail, 
Picture Frames Made to Order. 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings. 



J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 

DEALER IN 

■FANCY eOQBS* 

N0TI0HS, TRIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEWTON LOWER FALLS.] 

Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 

Orockery, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Meal Si Grain, Wholesale & Retail. 

Agency for M me. Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

CHILDS, FULLER & CO., 

Wholesale & Retail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, LAMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &c. 

Agents for Perkins & House's Safety Lamps. 
No. 680 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

;r. i^:rsro^Ar.L_i:E]s cfc soirsrs, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh, Smoked and Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lohsters, Qnahangs, Pickerel Bait. 
All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FA1TEUIL HALL MARKET. BOSTON, MASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G-. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

FllJIT AHD VEGETABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 
Cellar No. 1, New Faneuil Hall Market, Boston 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAIL O R, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON". 

FEED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No. 9 Boylston Market, Boston. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and Vicinity furnished with 
any quantity desired. 

P, 0, Address, Auburndale. 

FB00V9B & ■•§11* 

FASHIONABLE 37 West Street, 



STATIONERS, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Envelopes are 
elegant and inexpensive. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



4111111' Materia 



Of Every Description, 



NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




Oriental Tea Co. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Betail Dealers in 



T I A 



5) 



And Boasters and Sealers in 



COFFEE. 

The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 




8 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Established 1847.] 

AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON. 



)taiioim*8 mtd llanypok 



[anuflactara 



First-OlasslAcoo ant Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAT. 

Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1S67. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



ypfogg Photographing* 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PROVISION STOEE, 



AUBURNDALE, 

MASS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fhesh Vegetables in their season. 

-8ST Goods delivered free of charge. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's 'Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.T WHOLESALE A.1Y» BETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & ROWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Painter^' 0upplie£, $fti^' JVIateriklja, 

AND 

ARCHHECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



BOSTON. 



SWAN «5c NEWTON, 

dealers in 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

henry swan. 
s. b. newton. 

HENRY F. MILLER, 



1 BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

@a@eRTT@6l), M1A§8. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings , 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WARES, 

E LOWEST PRICES. 

B. Sanford, Jr. 



EVERYTHING AT T 

H. W. Robinson. 



WATJEKS & IN MAIS, 

WEST NB-WTON ATsfD ATJBURNOALE, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Ptc 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FRANK WOOD, 
STEAM PR INTER, 

352 Washington Street, 

Nearly opposite Bromfleld Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

josieipih: -w. oierig-g-, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in Enameled Slate 

MAHTLES ill BRACKET SHELVES, ETC, 

Also, English Fluor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Tarlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromfleld 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

M anufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R. Eager & Co.; of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMPIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 
Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New F. H. Market, & 93 Olinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

nsrioHOLs c& h^^.t_jT_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfleld Street, - - - BOSTON. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

'ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

mm street. AUBURNOALE, MASS. 



GODDARD & CO., 

Importers and Retailers of 

Dress Trimm.irjgs, French flowers, Hats, Laces,.. 
Ruchings, Ties, Gloves, Corsets, Un- 
derwear, Hosiery, and 
Worsted Goods. 

HATS TRIMMED TO ORDER. 

3B WINTER STREET, 



THOMAS HALL, 

MANUFACTURING ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 
Telegraphkal, Philosophical, Mathematical, Optical, 
Galvanic, and Chemical Instruments 
of all Descriptions. 
Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels, 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 
Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. See Hall's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



XJXVm Kf LSUER S 



Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing 1 an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 




INFORMATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisinr 
rates, &c., 

ADDRESS, 



T;C.PAN5,252msHrNGTONStBosTON 



From Paine's Illustrated Price-List, 




No. 5. 



No. 10. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide 
French Burl Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 

No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY, 

Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 

No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Canal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





TDTJ^ZL FEUVLIISr^^. FACTI." 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., MAY, 1878. 



Number 8. 




atiing^ 



JOHN H. PRAY^SONS & CO. 

We have just received our Spring Stock of 

CHINA and JAPANESE 

STRAW 

MATTINGS, 

embracing a large and line assortment of white, check, and 
many fancy patterns, in all qualities, and at prices to com- 
pare with the times. All of these Mattings are made from 
" Fresh Grass," and all were imported this spring. We 
can offer superior inducements to those furnishing 

SUMMER COTTAGES, 

either in the country, or at the shore, as we have made 
specially large purchases, and can therefore afford to 
sell very much under the market rates. 



ORIENTAL RUGS! 

We have also a fine collection of such varieties of Rugs 
as are usually'laid on Mattings. Among the most expen- 
sive are, of course, the 

Smyrna, 
Indian, 
Persian, 



WHILE THE 



Geordez, 
Coula, 
Scinde, 

and others at less prices, make a beautiful appearance 
when laid on a fresh, white matting. In smaller rugs, 
the 

LAZAR RUG, 

of Scotch manufacture, is most used, as it is moderate in 
price and very durable, — certainly two desirable charac- 
teristics. Wo would respectfully invite you to examine 
our stock before purchasing elsewhere. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & GO,, 

558 & 560 

WASHINGTON ST., - BOSTON. 



Dickens. 

The world is divided between two opin- 
ions with regard to Dickens, but nobody is 
merely indifferent to him. The members 
of one class adore him with a love which is 
totally blind. They see no fault, no imper- 
fection in him. His books are to them a 
literature and a language in themselves ; his 
characters are intimate and well-beloved 
friends ; and his word-paintings are an ever- 
increasing source of delight. The other 
class vote him extravagant both in his hu- 
mor and in his pathos, consider his tact 
faulty, and think that by choosing his 
characters from so low a rank of life, he de- 
grades the reader. There must be a golden 
mean in a criticism of Dickens, and happy 
will we be if we find it. Justice must be 
done to the power and force with which his 
books are written — the clearness and dis- 
tinctness of outline which he gives his 
characters, and the minuteness of detail by 
which he shows us a patch in the carpet, a 
wrinkle under the eye, a dimple in the 
chin, or a strand of grey in the hair. But 
in our impartial criticism we must not for- 
get that he goes into raptures over little 
Ruth's pudding and a beautiful landscape, 
all in the same breath, and we are not sure 
but the pudding has the best of it. Then 
his books are not restful ; he inspires in us 
a feverish interest in the story, which dis- 
turbs, while it entertains. Have not all of 
us crept trembling to bed at midnight after 
finishing " Martin Chuzzlewit," or "Tale of 
Two Cities ? » 

Then Dickens idealizes not only the 
beautiful, but the vulgar. The ugly and 
the ridiculous are all considered by him 
as worthy to be immortalized. A stage- 
coach rouses him to transports, a red nose 
to poetry, and a worn-out shoe calls forth a 
burst of eloquence which would have done 
justice to a view of the Alps or the Yosem- 
ite Valley. But, admitting all his faults, 
could any of us do without him, or give 
him up ? Has he not his own place at our 
firesides, and his part in all our revels? 
Does a Christmas ever come that our hearts 
do not grow tender over Tiny Tim, and 
merry over the inexhaustable good humor 
of the other Cratchits ? 



We will always keep a soft spot in our 
hearts for little Nell, and we do not wonder 
that the great master had to walk the 
streets of London all night before he could 
give up this, the sweetest child of his brain, 
to death. So, you see we cannot give him 
up ! And as long as we live, Esther Sum- 
merson and Ada, dear old Tom Pinch at his 
organ, brave John Westlock and his little 
sweetheart, young David Copperfield with 
his " child wife," and the gentle Agnes, 
sweet Florence Dombey, and a host of 
others, will always be loved and cherished 
as friends ; and as long as they can sooth us 
with their sweet and gentle company, woo 
us to forgetfulness of our own sorrows, and 
to emulation of their noble deeds, so long 
will the name of Dickens be loved and re- 
vered among us. 



Bias? Reefing. 

A writer in the reign of Charles I., keep- 
ing a record of his daily life, gave it the 
quaint name of "Slips, Infirmities and 
Passages of Providence." An author of 
later times called a diary a " Fault Book." 
A modern lady's journal, in which she com- 
ments on the round of pleasure forming 
her life, on new novels and various tender 
passions, would doubtless cause much 
righteous indignation in the breasts of such 
grave autobiographers. Few are they in 
our age, who, like Titus beloved of old, 
reflect seriously each night upon the day's 
actions, and on failing to remember any 
memorable deed, exclaim, "Friends, I 
have lost a day !" Fewer are they who 
would record the deeds of a busy, true life 
like that of Shaftsbury's, and deem the re- 
cord a "Fault Book." 

Everyone, probably, has sooner or later 
endeavored to keep some manner of an ac- 
count of his every day life, from the child 
who sums up the twelve hours by " Forget 
what did," or "Had appel pie for diner," 
to the statesman who finds time in the 
whirl of official duties to commit to paper 
hasty comments on important events and 
noteworthy characters. 

In the time of James I. journal keeping 
amounted to a real fashion ; men in private 
and court life, learned and otherwise, stolid- 



LA SELL LEA FES, 



ly persevered in following the fashion ; 
women, ladies and duchesses confided to 
paper stories of gay masques, hawking 
parties, chivalrous gallants and envious 
beauties ; or, if of a more thoughtful char- 
acter, wrote biographies of celebrated 
husbands or friends. 

The diary of Evelyn, a record of an 
actor's upright life, passed in the midst of 
corrupt manners and morals, delights us by 
its vivid pictures of the times, as well as by 
the simple, childlike character of the 
author, whom we can but love. So, too, 
the quaint diary of Samuel Pepys is as fas- 
cinating as a romance to the reader who 
likes his history flavored with spice. Such 
records form invaluable aids to historians 
who wish to present something more than 
mere political revolutions and parliament- 
ary quarrels ; and alike are they invaluable 
to a student desirous of combining social 
and political history. History may refer 
to the great fire of London, but no definite 
idea of the terrible devastation can be 
gained like that to be found in the journal 
of Evelyn, who states, concisely and 
simply, facts concerning the conflagration 
itself, the ravages it made, and the effects 
produced. Monarchs have employed this 
method of keeping an account of State af- 
fairs, thus leaving to posterity sketches of 
persons and events, bits of secret history 
and thoughtful observations, which may 
have escaped even an acute historian. 
Kidiculers of the custom exist, and always 
have existed. The mother of Lady Mary 
Montague, whose letters have delighted 
thousands, considered the " scribbling pro- 
pensity" of her daughter a disgrace to 
the family, and destroyed many of her 
epistles, to keep them from a publisher's 
hands. 

Diary-keeping now-a-days is considered 
as belonging exclusively to sentimental 
young ladies, who take pleasure in musing 
over their latest conquests and the prevail- 
ing fashion ; but why should it fall into 
such low esteem ? What could better em- 
ploy our leisure hours than thoughtfully 
committing to paper serious reflections on 
current events, prominent characters and 
recent literature ? If it is objected that 
our life is quiet and unimportant, contain- 
ing no events worthy of mention, why 
might we not make a daily record the 
means of mental and moral culture, and 
also a means of measuring our intellectual 
growth ? 

" dear !" exclaimed a young lady 
when she first beheld a cucumber. "I 
always thought they grew in slices." 



fit m 



Sad Mayflower ! watched by winter stars, 

And nursed by winter gales, 
With petals of the sleeted spars, 

And leaves of frozen sails! 

What had she in those dreary hours, 

Within her ice-rimmed bay, 
In common with tho wild-wood flowers, 

The first sweet smiles of May? - 

Yet " God be praised !" the Pilgrim said, 

Who saw the blossoms peer 
Above the brown leaves, dry and dead, 

"Behold our Mayflower here!'' 

" God wills it : here our rest shall be; 

Our years of wandering o'er, 
For us the Mayflower of the sea 

Shall spread her sails no more." 

O sacred flowers of faith and hope, 

As sweetly now as then 
Ye bloom in many a birchen slope, 

In many a pine-dark glen. 

Behind the sea-wall's rugged length, 

Unchanged, your leaves unfold, 
Like love behind the manly strength 

Of the brave hearts of old. 

So live the fathers in their sons, 

Their sturdy faith be ours ; 
And ours the love that overruns 

Its rocky strength with flowers. 

The Pilgrim's wild and wintry day 

Its shadow round us draws; 
The Mayflower of his stormy bay, 

Our Freedom's struggling cause. 

But warmer suns erelong shall bring 

To life the frozen sod ; 
And, through dead leaves of hope, shall spring 

Afresh the flowers of God ! 

— Whittier. 



Mm Im&glMKj !fei| §mm Iiw ¥ ask to 

It was one morning in September, that 
we sailed in the good ship "Parthia," 
bound for a three months' tour in France 
and Germany. A speedy passage brought 
us to our port, Havre, which city we did 
not stop to explore, but pressed on toward 
the longed-for Paris. We did stop at 
Rouen, however, just long enough to see 
its Abbey of St. Ouen, founded in 533, in 
the reign of Clotaire I., and the magnifi- 
cent church of St. Maclou. This old town 
dates from the time of the Romans, and 
abounds in interesting objects of antiquity. 
Hurrying on we were soon in Paris, which 
Victor Hugo calls "the hostess of all na- 
tions." Here, of course, we found hosts 
of things to admire — the Madeleine, copied 
after the temple of Theseus, at Athens ; the 
palace of the Louvre, with its many art 
treasures, among which the Venus de 
Milo stands pre-eminent ; the Tuileries, 
the Place du 'Carrousel, whose principal 



ornament is the Triumphal Arch, designed 
after the arch of Septimius Severus, at 
Rome ; the Place de la Concorde, where 
stands the obelisk of Luxor, and which 
was the scene of many of the most horrible 
executions in the Reign of Terror; the 
Place Vendome, where is the column 
erected by Napoleon, modeled from the 
column of Trajan, at Rome ; the Hotel 
des Invalides, where are the tombs of 
Napoleon and Turenne ; the palace or 
museum of the Luxemburg ; the great 
arch erected by Napoleon in the Place 
de l'Etvile ; the magnificent church of 
Notre Dame, on the island of La Cite ; 
the Imperial Library, which is the largest 
in the world. While here we visited Ver- 
sailles, and explored its beautiful palaces 
and gardens. 

After leaving Paris we hastened on to 
Rheims, renowned in the Middle Ages, and 
were charmed with its wide streets and odd- 
looking houses ; its cathedral, one of the 
finest Gothic structures in Europe; its 
church of St. Remy ; the Triumphal Arch 
built by the Romans in honor of Csssar. 

Strasbourg was the next city which de- 
tained us. Here the great attraction is 
the vast Cathedral, begun in the tenth cen- 
tury, whose spire is the highest in the 
world (466 feet), and whose clock is truly 
a marvel. 

Strasbourg also boasts of a fine Jewish 
synagogue ; a library, containing over 
130,000 volumes ; a royal academy, and an 
art gallery. At Mayence we took a Rhine 
steamboat, and proceeded up this pictur- 
esque river to Cologne. At Cologne is the 
magnificent cathedral founded in 814, 
under Charlemagne, and which in 1162 
became hallowed to pilgrims by the ashes 
of the three holy kings, brought from Milan 
by Frederic Barbarossa. Here, too, is the 
church of St. Peter, in which is the famous 
altar-piece representing the crucifixion of 
Peter, painted by Rubens. The museum 
of the city contains many Roman antiqui- 
ties and pictures of the school of Cologne. 
This city was the birthplace of Rubens. 

From Cologne we proceeded to Dresden, 
the city which is called the " German 
Florence." It is a handsome city, having 
twenty-seven public squares and a number 
of splendid monuments. Its palaces are 
many and superb ; its theatre is one of the 
finest in Germany ; its educational institu- 
tions are also fine. It is chiefly noted for 
the renowned Art Gallery, surpassing any- 
thing north of the Alps. Here is the 
Madonna de San Sisto, and noted paintings 
by Correggio, Da Vincia, Vandyke, Titian, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Rubens, Hans Holbein and Claude Lor- 
raine. Here is also the finest collection 
of engravings in Europe. The famous 
"Green Vaults" are a number of rooms 
where are exhibited jewels, crowns, scep- 
tres, etc., noted for their value and history. 

Berlin is a beautiful city, on both sides 
of the Spree River. Its chief attractions 
are its splendid palaces and buildings on 
" Unter den Linden," its principal street; 
its parks, gardens and statues; its museum, 
which contains the frescoes of Maulbach, 
and its University, which was founded in 
1810, and has boasted of such names as 
Hegel, Schelling, Enche, Muller, Lumpt 
and Neander. Near Berlin is Potsdam, 
celebrated for its beautiful palaces and 
villas. 

Our journey extended through Germany ; 
but time fails me to speak of the other 
cities and towns which we visited. 



m 



Musicians,, 



Musical memory is wonderfully powerful 
in some individuals. That power of mu- 
sical memory which enables those who 
possess it to play long and difficult composi- 
tions without any reference to the notes 
thereof, can be cultivated to an almost 
unlimited extent, as in the case of Von 
Bulow and others. All musicians, and 
especially amateurs, should strive to ac- 
quire this power. How often, when some 
lady known to be the possessor of a sweet 
voice is asked to sing a favorite song, do 
we meet with the response, " I do not sing 
w ith o ut my notes." Of what value is it to have 
the accomplishment of being a musician, if, 
in order to avail ourselves of it, we must be 
tied to notes, and must lug a great roll of 
music with us wherever we go ? To what 
purpose has money been lavished upon the 
musical education of a young lady, if she 
is tuneless and songless among the birds, 
and every place else away from her books ? 
" How will such people sing in heaven?" 
as Charles Reade says. Let young musi- 
cians be taught to rely more on their memory, 
and less on their books. Let them be 
required not only to learn to play correctly, 
but to learn by heart — to commit to memory 
every composition they play, as accurately 
and thoroughly as they have been made to 
commit the alphabet. When this is done, 
the music which w% hear in amateur circles 
will lose much of the cold precision, the 
purely mechanical quality, which it pos- 
sesses to so great a degree, and will show 
forth more of the living, breathing spirit of 
music — the spirit that makes music one of 
the highest, grandest and noblest Of arts. Ex. 



" Nine, sir," observed a social scourge, 
"I can speak nine languages distinctly; 
but my father, when alive, could speak no 
less than fifteen." " Ah ! " remarked Doug- 
lass Jerrold, "I knew a man who could 
speak five-and-twenty, and he never said 
anything worth hearing in any one of 
them." 



The class of "78, contrary to the usual 
custom of Lasell Seniors, have decided to 
celebrate Class Day ; but the appointments 
are simply the choice of the class, and not 
honors. They are as follows, viz. : Saluta- 
tory, Jennie Darling ; History, Alice Lin- 
scott ; Advice to Undergraduates, Annie 
White ; Prophecy, Alice Magoun ; Vale- 
dictory, Alice Dunsmore ; Class President, 
Maggie Hamilton. Carrie Kendig replies 
for '79. The class has chosen for their 
rings pink onyx, the class color, with an 
" L " in intaglio, and the class motto, " Esse 
quam videri," engraved on the inside. At 
present, the lily-white finger of each Senior 
sports one of the aforementioned articles. 



On the evening of May 1st, sounds of 
revelry and mirth echoed through Lasell's 
quiet halls. The occasion of all this merri- 
ment was the supper spread for the Seniors, 
in No. 33. The voices of these young 
women, which are generally "gentle, soft, 
and low," were, upon this occasion, raised 
to an exultant pitch, and rang out clearly 
on the startled air. You would not have 
wondered had you been there to see. " Oh, 
countrywomen, what a feast was there ! " 
The fair damsels all being devotees of Nep- 
tune, Bacchus did not preside ; but the 
bowl went round filled with sparkling 
water and the pure juice of lemons, with a 
modicum of C 12 H,. O n . As "non disputan- 
dum de gustibus," some sipped with their 
ruby lips from the top of the bowl, and 
others partook of the dregs. But this was 
not all that cheered their hearts — ah no ! 
the fruits of all climes contributed to the 
enjoyment of the banquet. The counte- 
nance of each Senior beamed with joy as 
she gazed upon this goodly array, and each 
immediately proceeded to do her share 
toward clearing the board. When energy 
flagged, the President cheerfully waved the 
banner on high, and with the cry " On to 
Victory!" urged them to renewed efforts. 
The assembly broke up at a late hour, and 
each wended her way in silence to her own 
domicil, laden with a peanut as a souvenir 
of the feast. 



I&iiM !©tld of Tg&eMsg Languages, 

It has always been a problem how to 
acquire the greatest amount of knowledge 
in the shortest space of time. The lan- 
guages have always been deemed particu- 
larly hard of acquisition, and even those 
who can translate readily can seldom con- 
verse fluently ; and many who thought 
themselves able to speak a language easily, 
because of their ability to understand the 
written tongue, have found that their 
knowledge was nearly useless. The method 
of Professors Heness and Sauvem*, as 
taught at the summer school in Amherst, 
last year, has greatly removed the difficul- 
ties in the way. It is rightly called the 
natural method, for one learns it as a child 
learns to talk. Prof. Heness says: "My 
experience teaches me, that by book we 
never can learn to speak." . It would seem 
ridiculous to teach a child in that way to 
speak its native tongue ; and yet, we are 
all like the child in learning a foreign lan- 
guage. This method is especially adapted 
for children ; but the greatest difficulty in 
the way of the older person, is the tempta- 
tion to translate ideas into his own language. 
A musical person finds in this method great 
advantages which the cultivation of a 
discriminating power in his sense of hear- 
ing gives him. This method requires on 
the part of both teacher and scholar more 
diligent application, particularly in the 
class-room. It is as important for the pupil 
to attend to the recitations of the others as 
to his own, and the teacher finds no time 
to relax effort. The habit of concentration of 
mind which it enforces is of its great advan- 
tages. Committing to memory strengthens 
that faculty, and the perceptions and rea- 
soning faculty are developed by the exercise 
which they get. Were these all the advan- 
tages, this method would deserve our 
approval ; but in addition to the discipline 
which it affords the mind, one acquires a 
thorough knowledge of the language in less 
time than by the old method of Grammar 
and Reading- Book. Thoroughness is one 
of the essentials of this system. The habit 
of speaking in the class-room only the lan- 
guage taught, forces one to quickness of 
thought and expression, until after a time one 
even thinks in the language. Pupils in our 
own school who have received instruction 
in both methods, are unanimous in favor of 
that taught at present, for they say they 
not only learn to speak more fluently, but 
that they can read more correctly, and that 
idiomatic expressions are much more 
quickly mastered. We are glad that the 
numerous summer schools scattered through 
the country will introduce it so widely. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR. 



— BY THE — 

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— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



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ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
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f<l ! 



vv 



We have read a good many articles on 
the subject of " Gossip," and remember 
finding them very bright and entertaining 
at the time. They usually had for their 
dramatis personce the traditional female of 
uncertain age, whose delight it is to inspect 
the affairs of her neighbors, and either 
a pair of lovers, or a husband and wife, 
whom this same female succeeds in making 
unhappy for a time, who finally see through 
the plot, make up and live happy ever 
after. Now, if this were the extent of 
scandal, we might indeed laugh and con- 
sider it of no great importance ; but, unfor- 
tunately, the accounts of fiction do not 
show us all the sides of a story, and true 
life tells of cases where the denouement 
came too late to bring happiness — cases in 
which the mischief-makers were no sour 
old maids, but pretty young girls, who 
should have more of the milk of human 
kindness in them than to injure anyone by 



what they say. Especially in colleges 
and boarding-schools do young people ac- 
quire this habit ; for there what one knows 
another knows, and stories increase won- 
derfully as they go. To be sure it is often 
unintentional, but care should be taken 
against repeating, or even listening to 
reports which in any way cast reflections 
on a person's character. We can not 
know of the bitter tears shed and sad 
hours passed by some one whose fair name or 
purpose has been slightingly spoken of — do 
not realize the injury we may do by putting 
in circulation reports which will cause 
others to disrespect them ; and it is quite 
certain that a, friend will never be guilty of 
such acts. It is something to be ashamed 
of when, in a collection of fifty people, 
a story is told and enlarged upon, until half 
an hour is recounted as two hours or more, 
and other statements in proportion. Not 
only does slander — " whose edge is sharper 
than the sword " — injure its victim, but the 
person from whom it comes is doing him- 
self a wrong in forming such a habit ; and 
surely it is time that women, with all their 
other advancement, should learn to guard 
their tongues, that they may not be slight- 
ingly, though truly, spoken of as scandal- 
mongers. 



ffht 

Our girls are very much interested just 
now in the organization of an Archery 
Club. When the plan was first proposed 
by our Principal, nobody seemed very en- 
thusiastic over it ; but when told that the 
practice would put " grace in our every 
movement," and make us perfect prodigies 
of strength, every young woman resolved 
within herself that ere the close of the 
term, her name and her praise should be 
upon every tongue, and her proficiency in 
archery should be renowned from pole to 
pole. Now, the front lawn of the Seminary 
has been unceremoniously taken possession 
of by the archers, and if a peaceable stu- 
dent strolls out, under the delusion that she 
can snatch a quiet moment for Moral Philos- 
ophy or Botany under the trees, she is 
received with shouts of derision and is 
obliged to retire from the field discomfited, 
while the victors return to their sport with 
the proud consciousness of duty well per- 
formed. Some of the number have become 
pretty good marks-women, and now can 
almost hit the eye of the observer — if they 
aim at the target. We think it only fair 
that the neighbors and all passers-by be 
assured that we have no evil designs upon 



them ; for although their hats and other 
articles of apparel may be riddled by our 
arrows, still our intentions are good, and 
nothing is farther from our thoughts than 
to offend by these delicate little attentions. 
The uncertainty of all things earthly may 
account for the fact that the arrow goes 
backward over the head of the archer, in- 
stead of forward to the target ; or, perhaps, 
a chapter might be written on the "affinity" 
which seems to exist between that missile 
and any unwary stranger who may be loit- 
ering near. All jesting aside, we are 
heartily glad that our Principal has planned 
for us such a pleasant and healthful exercise; 
and the archery greatly enlivens our school 
life, and affords us additional motives for 
enjoying the beautiful weather, and avail- 
ing ourselves of all the fresh air and sun- 
shine within our reach. 

We hear that fascinating lawn suits and 
bewildering " archery hats " are in progress 
of making ; and before Commencement time 
our girls will be archers indeed, prepared 
to astonish their friends at home by the 
accuracy of eye and strength of arm. 

B©iiM IIIL 

One Saturday afternoon the peripatetic 
inmates of Lasell, under the escort of Pro- 
fessor Dole, climbed Doublet Hill, an ele- 
vation about one mile from the Seminary, 
and nearly three hundred and fifty feet 
above the level of the sea. Ascending the 
eastern slope, the path led through a dense 
growth of small trees, so that the prospect 
was hidden until the summit was reached, 
when it burst suddenly upon the view, ex- 
citing the wildest enthusiasm. 

Immediately below, the forest just 
passed through lay plumy with its young 
leaves ; farther on the Charles flowed se- 
renely through past its green banks, and 
beyond the picturesque walks of the Semi- 
nary added to the beauty of the scene ; 
while fourteen miles away the gilded dome 
of the State House shone in the sunlight, 
and Bunker Hill and the tower of Memori- 
al Hall, at Harvard, were distinctly visible. 
The chief object of this excursion was to 
witness the setting of the sun ; but heavy 
clouds so obscured the " bright god of 
day," that in this respect the journey might 
be considered unsuccessful. The beautiful 
view, however, so fully compensated for 
this disappointment, that all returned per- 
fectly satisfied. 

Mr. Dunsmore lately gladdened his 
daughter's heart by a visit. By the way, 
the other Seniors rather enjoyed that visit, 
too. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



0181 



■SuBfllti 



May we offer our humble opinion, and 
say that we think our friends in college 
journalism are many of them making mis- 
takes in filling their columns with such 
long, tedious articles on Literature and 
History ? We have noticed that those of 
our exchanges which contain short and in- 
teresting accounts of school affairs are the 
ones most read, and while an article on lit- 
erature is once in a while acceptable, many 
of them prove extremely tiresome. 

The Tilden Enterprise is thrice welcome 
to our exchange list, because it comes 
from a ladies' school ; but we do wish it 
would not have articles on the " Tyranny 
of Fashion," etc., for never having heard 
anything said on that subject before, it is 
difficult for us to grasp its meaning. 

The Chronicle is one of our favorites, and 
the number for May is, as usual, full of 
bright sayings and doings in college life. 

The Videlte goes somewhat to the oppo- 
site extreme, and devotes itself exclusively 
to its own college ; for which reason we 
presume it is of great interest to former 
students. 

The Crimson denies that a Chinese and 
Japanese elective is to be established at 
Harvard. We are very glad to hear it, for 
we feel quite sure that it would be too bad 
for the students to take any of their valua- 
ble time from the numerous arduous labors 
of boating, bicycling, etc 

The Tripod, for April, contains an article 
on the " Authority of Conscience," which 
savors strongly of a moral philosophy 
text-book. 

The Boston University Beacon surprises 
us somewhat by its poetry, which consists 
of discourses on eyes — blue, black, grey 
and otherwise. 

The Trinity Tablet evidently wishes to 
speak upon some new subject, for it moral- 
izes painfully on the coming vacation, the 
bitterness of parting, etc., etc. 



)'10gS„ 

Here is something for the pupils in elo- 
cution — a lesson in articulation: "Ma, 
are we cannibals ?" asked a little girl of 
her mother the other morning. " Why, my 
child, what do you mean ? " " Oh, nothing, 
only I heard you say to Bridget, ' Boy legs 
for breakfast.' " 

Sudden thought: — In all the numerous 
lives of George Washington, it is not 
mentioned whether or not he had a dog. — 
Ex. 



We insert the following extract from a 
musical paper, thinking it may prove en- 
couraging to the pupils in vocal culture : 
" The great Jenny Lind had much difficul- 
ty in learning to trill. Days and weeks 
were vainly spent by her in the attempt, 
until she was almost discouraged. Finally, 
one day, making a supreme effort, she ex- 
claimed, ' Mon Dieu ! I will do it.' Then, 
as if by inspiration, she succeeded in trill- 
ing beautifully. Overcome with emotion, 
the great singer, whose fortune was now 
assured, fell in tears and sobs at her teach- 
er's feet, and both pupil and master shed 
tears of joy together." 

The same paper says of Beethoven : 
" He seldom laid his hand upon anything 
without breaking it ; thus he several times 
emptied the contents of the ink-stand into 
the neighboring piano. No one piece of 
furniture was safe with him, and least of 
all a costly one ; he used either to upset, 
stain, or destroy it." 

So the great composer did not differ 
much from other men, for articles of delicate 
material are seldom safe with them. 

Speaking of flirts, how is this ? Senior 
is questioned : " What is the name of that 
lady to whom you are engaged ? " Senior 
blandly responds, " Which one ? " — Oberlin 
Review. 

Fresh', who reads war news: "If I 
were a Turkey as I am an American, I 
would gird up my loins, take my thorax in 
my hand, and go out against the enemy to 
perish or to die in the attempt." — Colby 
Echo. 

We thought it sounded natural, but it was 
some time before the Elocution class came 
to our mind. 

Student (in discussion). — "Professor, I 
rise to a point of information." Prof. 
— "You may state your point, sir." Stu- 
dent — " May I be excused from class." — 
Ex. 

" Squire Hobson," said a teacher, " Why 
are you going to take your son from 
school ? " "I don't like the way he's 
taught." "What is the matter?" "Oh, 
they said he must spell 'taters with a 'p.' " 

Junior (looking up Irom Sunday School 
paper with puzzled air) — "Who's Jere- 
miah?" Senior (patronizingly) — "What 
ignorance ! " An old Greek General, of 
course." Junior not satisfied, but thinks 
Senior ought to know. — Chronicle. 

" He waived his adieux," as the country 
editor remarked of a subscriber who had 
skipped out over-night, leaving his creditors 
in the lurch. 



tta Walls. 

The ear-splitting shriek of the young 
women is now 'heard in the land, for the 
June-bug is making himself quite numerous, 
as it were. 

We think the weather sufficiently warm 
to more than satisfy our Kentucky repre- 
sentative ; but she is not at all affected by 
it, and looks with scorn upon crimpless 
hair and flushed faces. 

The middle term examinations were all 
finished the first week in May, and now 
there will be a short period of rest in that 
direction until June. 

The last election for officers of the S. D. 
Society resulted as follows : President, 
Miss Linscott ; Vice-President, Miss Lover- 
ing ; Secretary, Miss Annie Kendig ; 
Treasurer, Miss Bowen ; Critic, Miss 
Flint ; Usher, Miss Carter. 

The new pins of the Society are very 
pretty indeed, consisting of the letters S. 
and D. intertwined, which makes a neat, 
and at the same time rich piece of jewelry. 

Lemons are all the rage now, and persons 
can be supplied with them at No. 5 Happy 
Hall. From the sounds proceeding from 
that room, we should think they were 
used as weapons by its occupants. 

It has been voted by the Literary Society 
to give the Seniors, who are members, a 
farewell supper and entertainment the week 
before school closes. 

Essays have been undergoing a process 
of ruthless cutting up and down, and the 
countenances of six girls have lengthened 
wonderfully, as they beheld the shattered 
fragments of their cherished productions. 

Since gymnastics were abolished, athletic 
pursuits upon the lawn have attracted 
general attention. Balls and arrows whiz 
by one's ears with lightning rapidity, and 
the gentle tap of the croquet mallet re- 
sounds on all sides. 

The diligent search of Mr. White has 
brought to light the diamond ring lost by 
Miss Watts, and her countenance is again 
wreathed in smiles. 

Later. — Miss Watts has met with an- 
other loss in the shape of an ear-ring. 

(First day of the archery : Miss E. to 
Miss H.) — " Aim at me, Miss II." (Miss 
H., in consternation): "Why?" i^Miss 
E.) : Because if you do, you'll be sure not 
to hit me. 



6 



LASELL LEAVES 



We can't compose an ode on the " Blos- 
soms of Spring," but we can appreciate 
the bright and pretty look they add to the 
rooms. 



Miss 



startled her friends a short 



time since by asking " Whc was it that 
went to heaven on a ladder ? " She " really 
couldn't think." Her friends were unable 
to assist her. — Tilden Enterprise. 

Many thanks are due to Prof. Dole for 
his kindness in taking the girls on such 
pleasant excursions this spring. The after- 
noons on the water have brought our girls 
back in high spirits, and with happy faces. 

A few weeks ago Dr. Tourjee re- 
ceived the members of his choir at his 
residence. The evening passed very pleas- 
antly in conversation and song. 

A few weeks ago the majestic nod of the 
head behind the desk, after prayers, was tak- 
en as a signal for a general uproar. That 
idea has been effectually dissipated, and 
now the young women file out with sealed 
lips and " eyes to the front," with the pre- 
cision of a regiment. 

Notman & Campbell are doing their 
work well, and the girls are all pleased 
with the appearance of their physiognomies 
on paper. 

We are all very glad to hear that our 
friend Miss Frances Willard, with her 
brother's widow, have taken charge of the 
Chicago Post. Although there are a num- 
ber of journals which have women to sup- 
port them, we believe this is the first open 
case, and have no doubt Miss Willard will 
be successful. 

A personage whose station is more ele- 
vated than his intelligence, asked a friend 
to come and dine with him without cere- 
mony, the other day. "I am sorry I can- 
not," was the answer ; " I want to go and 
see Hernani." "Well, bring her with 
you," replied the lofty personage — "bring 
her with you ! " 

Some years ago — it was in 1867 — the 
elder Mr. Bennett, of the Herald, sent for 
one of his editorial writers, and in a great 
rage scolded him for repeatedly using the 
prefix "Mr." when speaking of Horace 
Greely, whom the Herald was then urging 
on the Legislature as a candidate for United 
States Senator. He illustrated his mean- 
ing by asking the question, " You wouldn't 
speak of Mr. Socrates, would you? Gree- 
ley's a greater philosopher than Socrates 
ever was." The abashed editor promised 
never to repeat the offence. — Home Journal. 



A small boy wrote the following to the 
editor of a Chicago paper : 

" Will you please publish this it is the 
first story I ever rote I am 11 years old. 

Chapter I. 

Once their was a man who was walking 
the st. who a police caught sight of. He 
grabed the man by the collar and took him 
to the station. When he got their they 
asked him what he had stole, he said noth- 
ing they looked in his pockets and found 7 
hundred dollars and a ladies gold watch 
then they put him in the lock up and left 
him their. 

Chapter II. 

he looked around and soon caught sight 
of a brocken window which he escaped 
from. 

Chapter III. 

he ran for the woods and as he was going 
he met a friend of his named John Flint. 

Hallo John said he 

Hallo 

Wheir are you goin. 

Running way. 

Wheir from 

Jail 

Well you had better hurry up because 
their come the police. 

Wheir will I go 

For the river. 

Is their any boat their ? 

Yes. 

Good bye. 

And away he ran for the river with the 
police behind, he soon reached the river 
and sprang into a boat. 

Chapter IV. 

As he was crossing the river he saw a 
steamer after him. he roed with all his 
might but the steamer gained more and 
more until they caught him he killed two 
police but before he had time to kill another 
they had hand cuff on him and took to the 
penetentiary and hung him." 

From the deep depths of our editorial 
misery, we heave a sigh and wish — oh, so 
earnestly — that we could find some one as 
anxious " to write for the paper " as was 
the eleven-year-old author. 



Perhaps some of our pupils who intend 
to teach would like to go — not West, but 
farther East ; if so, please notice this item 
from an English paper : " Wanted, in 
Islington, a morning, daily governess, of 



lady-like manners, for three or four young 
female pupils, capable of imparting a sound 
English education, with French, music and 
singing, dancing and playing, unassisted 
by masters. She must be proficient in 
singing and playing, and able to devote the 
morning for five days in each week to her 
pupils. One resident in the district would 
be preferred. No inferior talent need 
apply. Salary, £2 a month. Unexception- 
able references will certainly be required. 
Address, prepaid," etc. Generous, is it 
not ? And we wonder how much they would 
pay a tutor for the instruction of three or 
four young male pupils. 



AGENT FOR THE 



«}W Jpjlautt fat €nm\\ €$> 



—AND— 



CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 

very Reasonable Kates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 



1 





mm ©a?f 



IS A HUNDRED DOLLARS EARNED. 



Every family can save from 

FIFTY TO ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS 

Every year, hy buying their TEAS and Family 
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places. 

GOODS DELIVERED 

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All orders for Twenty-Five Dollars and 
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person, or a club of several families, will 
be CAREFULLY packed and delivered by 
freight at the DEPOT in the place where 
they reside, provided it is within One Hun- 
dred Miles of Boston, 

FREE OF CHARGE. 



LA SELL L EA V E S. 



9 



Successors to John Hall, 



WlmlesRle * lietail D-«lers in 



DOORS, 

SASHES, 



BLINDS, 




MARBLEIZED SLATE 

MANTELS, 
AND SHELVES. 



177 and 183 BLACK6TONE STREET, 



C. D. Densmore. 



(Near H a ymarket Sq.,) 

BOSTON 



C. K. Brackett. 



GBOCEBY STOBE, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

ESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the veiy best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 



R' 



*®~A11 orders promptly attended to and delivered free 
DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

t .A. :m: e: s -v i o ik: :e :e=l s 7 

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(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes,) 
Importers ana Dealers In 

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At Wholesale and Betail, 
Picture Frames Made to Order, 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings, 

J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 

DEALER IN 

FANCY GOODS, 

NOTIONS, TRIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEWTON LOWER FALLS.] 

Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 

Crockery, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Heal Si Grain, Wholesale & Retail. 

Agency for M me, Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

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Wholesale & Retail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, LAMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &c 

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WIkiIckhIc mi,) Retail Dealera In Fresh, Smoked ami Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quahaugs, Pickerel Bait. 

All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MAKKET. BOSTON, UASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

F1UIT AMD ¥EGETABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 

Cellar No. 1 New Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

ALiFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale, 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
ut all hours. 

CHARLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St,, 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTEF, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 

No, 9 Boylston MarkeN Boston. 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale and Vic : nity furnished with 

any quantity desired. 

P, 0, Address, Auburndale. 



PStiliE 

FASHION ABL E 
STATIONERS, 



37 West Street, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Corresp« ndeuoe Cards and Envelopes are 
elegant and inexpensive. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Mills 8 Material 



Of Every Descrip-.ion, 



NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




Oriental Tea Co. . 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Eelail Dealers in 



T £ A 



5> 



And Boaster: and Dealers in 



COFFEE. 

The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 




8 

[Established 1847.] 

AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 
jraionm and j lank look j|anu|adurm 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAY. 

Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



^pass Pltfltagraglijeijs. 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PE0VISI01T STORE, 

AUBURNDALE, 
IMS. 



Constantly on hand, first-class Meats, Fresh and Salt, 
with Fkesh Vegetables in their season. 

4®=* Goods delivered free of charge. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
A.T WHOLESAL'E AJV» RETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & ROWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

l^ii}teiy $uf>$>lie£, <&ftij^' >fa.terial>, 

i AND 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



LA SELL LEA V E S. 
SWAN <5c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. Rnl , Tnn , 

S. B. NEWTON. BOSTON. 

HENRY F. MILLER, 

FIAI0-I08 1 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 

mOtQWVQiW, IM§8. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINEEY AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AX THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

WATERS & IN MAN, 

"WEST NEWTON .A-HSTID ATTBTJBNDALE, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FRANK WOOD, 
STEAM PRINTER, 

352 Washington Street, 
Nearly opposite Biomfield Street. BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

JOSISIPIEI "W\ GRIG-&, 
Manufacturer of aid Dealer in Enameled Slate 

11ITLIS III BRACKET SIELYES, ET& 

Also, E»iglisli Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Parlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromfleld 

Street, Boston, mass. 

THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R.Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

JAMES P. MAG-EE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New F. H. Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

ZTXTIOIEHIOILjS cfe: H^.T_jT_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfleld Street, - - - BOSTON. 

~W. H. FRENCH &c CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

* ■ 

G-. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

EEPAIBINGJ PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS 



GODDARD & CO., 

Importers and Retailers of 

Dress Trimmings, Prenoh flowers, Hats, Laces, 
Ruchings, Ties, Gloves, Corsets, Un- 
derwear, Hosiery, and 
Worsted Goods. 

HATS TRIMMED TO ORDER. 

39 "WINTTBR. STREET, 

BOSTON. 

THOMAS HALL, 

MANUFACTURING ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 

Telegraphieal, Philosophical, Mathematical, Optical, 

Galvanic, and Chemical Instruments 

of all Descriptions. 

Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels, 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. See Hall's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



ttmmwwmmmmmmi 



Will consult their interests by obtain- 
ing- an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 




INFORMATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertising 
rates, &c. 

ADDRESS, 



IC.EV^[^^21/ASHlNGTONSxDOSTaN 



From Paine's Illustrated Price-List. 




No. 5. 



No. 10. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide, 
French Bur] Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 



No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY 



Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 

No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Canal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





H>TX.2£L ZFTEJSAIISr^. PAOTI." 



Volume III. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., JUNE, 1878. 



Number 9. 



Canton Jpttmjp. 

JOHN H. PRAY, SON S & GO, 

We have jtist received our Spring Stock of 

CHINA and JAPANESE 

STRAW 

MATTINGS, 

embracing a large and line assortment of white, check, and 
many fancy patterns, in all qualities, and at prices to com- 
pare with the times. All of these Mattings are made from 
" Fresh Gkass," and all were imported this spring. We 
can offer superior inducements to those furnishing 

SUMMER COTTAGES, 

either in the country, or at the shore, as we have made 
specially large purchases, and can therefore afford to 
sell very much under the market rales. 



ORIENTAL RUGS! 

We have also a fine collection of such varieties of Rugs 
as arc usually laid on Mattings. Among the most expen- 
sive are, of course, the 

Smyrna, 
Indian, 
Persian, 

WHILE THE 

Geordez, 
Coula, 
Scinde, 

and others at less prices, make a beautiful appearance 
when laid on a fresh, white matting. In smaller rugs, 
the 

LAZAR RUG, 

of Scotch manufacture, is most used, iis it is moderate in 
price and very durable, — certainly two desirable charac- 
teristics. We would respectfully invite you to examine 
our stock before purchasing elsewhere. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO,, 

558 & 560 

WASHINGTON ST., - BOSTON. 



©if lirasaleB. 

The most enjc^able treat of the season 
was our trip to Concord and Lexington, on 
Saturday, May 18th. 

A large party of our girls, together with 
quite a number of the teachers, comforta- 
bly filled two of Mr. Lathrop's " barges." 
The ride was charming on that delightful 
spring day, through pleasant towns, cool 
groves, and past quiet country-seats. Ar- 
rived at Concord, we drove first to the 
residence of Mr. Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
where he entertained us in his own inimi- 
table manner. His home is very cosy and 
tasteful, and, at 'the same time, has about 
it an air of elegance and literary retire- 
ment well suited to the courtly, silver- 
haired gentleman who presides over it. 
We were especially interested in the library, 
where we saw many ancient volumes and 
specimens of European art, and whose very 
walls seemed an inspiration from the asso- 
ciations connected with them. 

The home of Miss Louise Alcott next 
claimed our attention ; and although it was 
then empty, the old brown house had for 
many of us girls a fascination not to be 
resisted. We sat down on a rustic seat at 
the base of an aged elm in the yard, and 
could almost imagine that we were "Jo," 
" Meg " and " Amy," and that in a moment 
or two " Laurie " would join us. But 
dreaming away our precious time in this 
way was quite out of the question, so we 
reluctantly followed the rest of the party in 
their visit to the old home of Mr. Nathaniel 
Hawthorne, where the " Wayside School" 
is now kept. Parts of the house are most 
characteristic of the author ; as, for in- 
stance, the tower which he built, that he 
might have some place of retreat when 
desiring to be alone ; and it is even said 
that he entered it by a trap door, which, 
closing, he sat upon, thus barring any 
attempt at entrance. Now we stroll through 
" Hawthorne's Walk," a perfectly secluded 
path through a grove, where the author is 
said to have composed several of his works. 
Perhaps the most delightful visit of the 
whole, was the one made to the "old 
manse, " where Hawthorne wrote his 
" Mosses." A strange feeling of awe stole 



over us upon entering the house, and we 

touched the smallest article with reverence, 

for everything seemed dim with the dust 

of ages. The low ceilings, the fire-place 

with brightly-burnished andirons, all the 

furniture of the most ancient kind, the odd 

little shelves, and queer, mysterious nooks 

and crannies, the tiny window-panes — in 

fact, everything about the building, carried 

us back a hundred years or more ; and as 

we looked out of the window from which 

the first attack of the British was seen, we 

fairly started, and listened expectantly for 

the report of gun or cannon. 

A few moments later we stood by the 

monument erected to the memory of the 
brave boys who fell in the battle of Lexing- 
ton, and the whole scene of so many years 
ago rushed over us with such an over- 
whelming force, as almost to stop our heart- 
beats. It was just such another day as 
this ; the river flowed quietly through green 
meadows where the farmers were busy at 
work, the sky was bine and serene as now, 
when the shout, " To arms, the British are 
coming!" rang out on the air; and the 
farmer threw down his tools to grasp gun 
or sword, while village merchants rushed 
to the scene of conflict. That was a sad 
day for many a mother and sister, for 
before long the river ran red, and the 
grass was all trampled and stained. That 
first cry for liberty still rings in our ears, 
for it emboldened other men to deeds of her- 
oism ; it made brave many a timid woman ; 
and, as the results, America, our dearly- 
loved country, became a free land. 

Another pleasant time was enjoyed at 
the former home of Mr. Thoreau, where 
Mr. Alcott now resides with his family. 
We were received with the greatest kind- 
ness by our host and his eldest daughter, 
who made our short visit one long to be 
remembered. The home of the author of 
"Little Women," is charming; the fine 
paintings of one member of the family 
especially attracted our attention. Mr. 
Alcott had kindly prepared autographs for 
our party, and in other ways he made our 
stay exceedingly pleasant. 

We could not leave Concord without 
visiting its -famous little public library, 
and we spent a half hour in examining its 



LASELL LEAVES. 



contents. We noticed in the reading-room 
a very fine painting of Mr. Emerson, life 
size, which was executed in Scotland. 
Fine busts of Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau 
and others, adorned the building, and we 
were much interested in the manuscripts 
of several authors. 

Coming back to Lasell by the way of 
Lexington, we visited the battle-ground, 
and read with interest the inscriptions 
upon the monument erected by the citizens 
in honor of their patriotic dead. 

We drove home through villages with 
the hush of eveniug upon them, and 
through the still more silent country, 
bringing with us the memory of a day 
spent on battle-fields ever to be remem- 
bered by loyal Americans, and in visiting 
the homes of some of the world's great 
writers. 



Iliteiti lake lea Wise. 

The great object of education is to pre- 
pare ourselves for the proper discharge of 
those numerous duties which belong to us 
as citizens, and from which we cannot free 
ourselves. In order to acquire this educa- 
tion we must profit not only by our own 
experience, but by that of others. 

The principal object in the reading of 
history ought to be a study of the charac- 
ters and opinions of men. " He who reads 
history," says Montaigne, "should not 
attend so much to the era of time in which 
Carthage was destroyed, as to the manners 
and customs of Hannibal and Scipio." 

It is a wise reflection, that it is very dif- 
ficult to distinguish the true from the false 
by the aid of history ; for if written many 
ages after the events described, the anti- 
quity of the actions is an obstacle to ascer- 
taining the truth ; and if written during the 
lives of the persons of whom it speaks, per- 
sonal feelings of adulation or envy influence 
the author to write without regard to the 
truth. " Do not read history to me," says 
Sir Robert Walpole to his son, " do not 
read history, for that I know to be false." 
Lord Bolingbroke, on the contrary, writes 
on its use and study, discusses the same 
point, and maintains the truth of history. 

It may be that feigned situations are the 
best for producing great examples ; but it is 
certain that influence of characters and 
examples makes a much greater impression 
upon us if there is a probability of their 
truth. If, then, we allow that history is 
the foundation of knowledge, we caunot 
better illustrate this belief than by taking 
lessons from it — by avoiding the mistakes 
of its heroes, and imitating their virtues. 



We cannot turn from these examples, in 
which history abounds, without finding our 
circle of benevolence enlarged, and with- 
out having for man, in general, those feel- 
ings of kindness and regard which might 
otherwise have been limited to our own 
acquaintance ; and those who have worked 
for posterity, have not lived and worked in 
vain. Unless the past be known, the pres- 
ent is not understood ; for the knowledge of 
past ages is, with little variation, the 
knowledge of the present. 

Has not Shakspeare, in his marvelous 
way, exactly stated this fact with regard 
to knowledge as obtained from history ? 

" There is a history in all men's lives 
Figuring the nature of the time deceased ; 
The which, observed, a man may prophesy 
With a near aim, the main chances of things 
As yet not come to life." 

Thus by reading history, and becoming 
acquainted with all the great and good who 
have lived before us, we may form our 
characters upon the united example of men 
in every age and country ; for " what the 
chart is to the mariner, the pages of the 
historian should be to us." 



Among our exchanges, the Vidette is read 
with great pleasure. It sparkles with the 
bright side of student life, and the literary 
matter is always of a high order. 

The Monthly Musings, a college paper 
from Richmond, Va., is very readable ; but 
the article entitled " Twilight," and 
signed " Orland's," soars too far above 
all earthly things for our limited imagina- 
tive powers. 

The University Herald comes to us from 
Syracuse University, and, if we may judge 
by this first number, will prove a valuable 
addition to our list of exchanges. Its 
exterior is very handsome, and the reading 
matter is considerably above the average, 
and entirely puts even the Crimson in the 
shade, strange as it may seem. We were 
especially pleased with the article on 
Henry Kirke White, which occupies the 
first page. 

The only thing which struck us very 
forcibly in the " Aurora," was the earnestly 
expressed wish that man's tongue might 
be to him " a tree of life." We wish so, 
too, though we would thank our friend, the 
Aurora, very much, if it could or would 
furnish us information as to how this very 
desirable result might be brought about. 



It is always a pleasure to us to receive 
the College Transcript, but we were deeply 
grieved to find in its columns a parody on 
that much-abused and long-suffering solil- 
oquy of Hamlet. The Prince of Denmark 
would doubtless have decided his famous 
question in the negative, could he have 
foreseen all these thousands of imitations 
which were to start into life from his great 
production. 

School Days, the Newton High School 
paper, is improving at every issue, and we 
read it with interest. 

The Exonian seems to have devoted all 
its energies to the amelioration of the Ex- 
onian, and the "squelching" of all rivals, 
particularly those from girls' schools. The- 
Leaves did not mean to be guilty of any 
such presumption as an attempt to " scold" 
the Exonian ; but as its sensitive feelings 
were evidently hurt by so small a fire, we 
will be more careful in future lest we 
injure so delicate a plant. 



Pis mi Soiesus. 

Coming back from a little trip to Havre, 
a Parisian bewails his misfortunes to his 
railway companion. " One thing is cer- 
tain — you won't catch me on any more of 
these pleasure excursions. I lost my wife 
and my cane." And then he adds, with 
tears in his eyes, " A new cane, too." 

A visitor at an art gallery being asked 
whether he preferred pictures to statuary, 
said he preferred the latter, as " you kin go 
all round the statoos, but you can't see only 
one side of the picters." 

Class in Zoology : Professor, examin- 
ing upon the structure of the lobster — 
"Yes, within the hard outer shell a mem- 
brane, and within this membrane, what, — 
Miss S. ? " Miss S., modestly, and in 
haste — "Why, all its physiology ! " — Vassar 
Miscellany. 

Class in Grecian History. Prof. — "Give 
a sketch of the expedition of Xerxes 
against Athens." 2d Class man — " Why — 
he collected a large army, and built a 
bridge across the Peloponnesus where it is 
one mile wide." Prof. — "Hardly." — 
Greylock Monthly. 

Teacher with reading class : Boy (read- 
ing) — " And as she sailed down the river " 
— Teacher — "Why are ships called 
she ? " Boy (precociously alive to the re- 
sponsibilities of his sex) — " Because they 
need men to manage them." 



LASELL LEAVES. 



When the phonograph comes into gen- 
eral use, singers will be sending samples 
of their voices and methods all over the 
country when they wish to procure engage- 
ments, and Mrs. Caudle can sing her baby 
to sleep while she is giving a curtain lecture 
to the husband and father. 

Gregory, of the Buffalo Express, mod- 
estly replies to the Pittsburg Telegraph's 
inquiry, " Can two constitute a riot ? " by 
saying, " Not unless they happen to be 
married." 

If you do not want to be" robbed of your 
good name, do not have it printed on your 
umbrella. 

He is seated at a table at a restaurant. 
Before him is an immense plate of pancakes. 
" It is singular," he muses ; " they say 
appetite comes with eating. Two cakes, 
no appetite ; three, four, five, six— still no 
appetite. Decidedly, I am very sick." 

At a party the other evening there was 
a lull in the conversation, which made the 
host, who was inexperienced, somewhat 
nervous. With a view to relief, he asked 
a mournful-looking man if he was married. 
"No, I am a bachelor," stiffly replied the 
sombre man. " Ah ! " observed the host, 
warming up with the subject. " How long 
have you been a bachelor?" There was 
another lull in the conversation. 

"I was requested to see you, sir, by 
your lovely daughter. Our attachment " 

"Young man," interrupted the 

parent, briskly," " I don't know what that 
girl of mine is about. You are the fourth 
gentleman who has approached me this 
morning on the subject. I have given my 
consent to the others, and I give it to you. 
God bless you." — Student Life. 

Two young men out riding were passing 
a farm house where a farmer was trying to 
move an obstinate mule. "Won't he 
draw?" asked one of the young men. 
" Of course," said the farmer ; " he'll draw 
the attention of every fool that passes this 
way." The young man drove on. — Aurora. 



Luck is the giddiest of all creatures, 
Nor likes in one place long to stay; 

She smooths the hair back from your features, 
Kisses you quick and runs away. 

Dame Ill-Luck's in no such flurry, 
Nor quick her close embrace she quits ; 

She says she's in no kind of hurry, 
And sits upon your bed— and knits. 

W. W. STOUY,/rom the German. 



An anatomist has been examining the 
hands of Liszt, the great pianist and com- 
poser, and finds them to possess some re- 
markable characteristics. The middle fin- 
ger of each hand is knotted, and very 
powerful, and the force of the little fingers 
is enormous. The knuckles seem to be 
made of iron, and those of the second finger 
are like a hinge. The hand in general is a 
large, square one, the first and second 
fingers being blunt, and the third and fourth 
flat and broad. 

A young man with a delicate lisp, hair 
parted in the middle, with an eye-glass 
screwed into one eye, fancying he was 
suffering from physical debility, consulted 
a physician. The doctor's promptness in 
recommending " brain food," has caused 
him many thoughtful moments since. 

GRIEF. 
BY WALTER SCOTT. 

Then happy those, since each must drain 
His share of pleasure, share of pain ; — 
Then happy those, beloved of Heaven, 
To whom the mingled cup is given — 
Whose lenient sorrows find relief, 
Whose joys are chasten'd by their grief. 

Junior Clerk : " Would you kindly per- 
mit me to absent myself to-morrow, to attend 
my father's funeral ? " Head of firm (deep 
in figures) — " You may go, Hawkins ; but 
pray do not let this happen again." 

Say not, because thou canst not do 
everything, "I will do nothing." — Jewish 
Saying. 

With God, go over the sea ; without Him, 
not over the threshold. — Bussian Proverb. 

It is the greatest courage to be able to 
bear the imputation of a want of courage. 
— B. Clay. 

It many times falls out that we deem 
ourselves much deceived in others, because 
we first deceive ourselves. — Sir Phillip 

Sydney. 

There are two things to which we never 
grow accustomed — the ravages of time and 
the injustice of our fellow-men. — Tally- 
rand. 

This I moreover hold, and dare 

Affirm, where'er my rhyme may go- 
Whatever things be sweet or fair, 
Love makes them so. Whittier. 

To be assured of our salvation is no ar- 
rogant stoutness ; it is our faith : it is no 
presumption ; it is God's promise : it is no 
pride ; it is devotion. — Augustine. 

Caroline of Denmark, who has just com- 
pleted her eighty fourth year, is the oldest 
princess in Europe. 



If any one desires to hear an entertain- 
ing book without the trouble of reading it 
for herself, let her take up her abode in 
" Happy Hall." There issues at all hours 
of the day, from No. 2, the sound of a 
maiden's voice raised in the style most 
approved by elocution teachers. Also, 
the class of '80 may have their Latin trans- 
lated for them any day, by taking a seat in 
the vicinity of No. 4. 

Scene in Happy Hall. (Time, 9.30. 
Dramatis personce, two young women.) 
Ye June bug lodgeth among ye curtains. 
Ye maiden screameth, and teareth her hair. 
Ye other maiden screameth more, and tear- 
eth her hair morer ; and still ye June bug 
reposeth among ye curtains. Ye maiden 
openeth the door, and precipitateth herself 
into the hall. Then both rise, and with one 
fell swoop tear ye curtains down, and open 
ye bureau drawer, shake ye June bug 
therein, and close ye drawer. Then sink 
ye maidens prostrate on ye floor. 

Miss Watts held true to her reputation 
to the last, and at the last meal, an- 
nounced the loss of an autograph album. 



In Satisfy iifpt. 

On the evening of Friday, June 7th, a 
very merry party assembled in the 
"Forum," for it was the occasion of the 
supper given by the S. D's to the Seniors, 
who were members of the society. On 
entering the room, our eyes were fairly 
dazzled by the magnificence before us, for 
the committee had surpassed themselves 
on this occasion, and the table fairly 
groaned with good things. After a time 
of sociality, the real business of the even- 
ing was entered into with great spirit, and 
for a time everybody was delightfully 
busy. After the first ardor had somewhat 
abated, Miss Longyear, as toast-master, 
called for a toast to the Senior class, which 
was given by Miss Atkinson, bravely sec- 
onded by the society in lemonade with a 
straw ia it, and responded to by Miss 
Hamilton, as President of the class. 
Other toasts were given and replied to ; 
conspicious among them was the one to 
the " Coming Husbands," ably responded 
to by Miss Lovering. The evening passed 
happily and swiftly away, and we all 
sought our rooms, calling down blessings 
on the S. D. Society. Long may it wave ! 



Professor (looking at his watch) — "As 
we have a few minutes, I should like to 
have any one ask questions, if so disposed." 
Student — " What time is it, please? " 



LA S E L L LEA V E S. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



•BY THE — 



Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AOBURNDALE, MASS. 

EDITOR, 
M. ALICE LINSCOTT, '78. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
MARGARET HAMILTON,^. ALICE N. MAGOUN,'78. 

PUBLISHER, 
S. LIZZIE EMERSON. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHER, 
LUCIE J. FENN. 



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As we come to the last few days or 
weeks of the school, there is always a 
countless number of things to be done ; and 
hardest of all those things to do, is the 
saying of good-bye to friends, teachers, 
lessons, books, rooms, and the dear famil- 
iar places. In vain we put it off; it comes 
near to us every hour ; and so, in spite of 
our unwilling spirit, we are now obliged 
to take our editorial leave of friends and 
patrons. 

We think that our paper has made con- 
siderable progress during the past year, 
and we who were here when the Leaves 
were first issued, now feel well pleased 
with the sheet which we send forth. But 
it must be remembered by all who have an 
interest in its welfare, that it ought to 
make just as much progress in the future. 
There is no standing still ; and where no 
advancement is made, there must be a ret- 
rograde movement — which we hope never 
will be the case with our Laeves. But in 



order to progress at the desired rate, there 
are a number of points to be observed. 
The paper is a school affair, and something 
in which each member of the school ought 
to take an interest ; and there is no way of 
showing that interest so good as contrib- 
uting to its columns. No one should even 
wait to be asked, for the youngest person 
in school is capable of doing something for 
us, and when asked, should certainly not 
refuse. It makes the paper much more 
work than need be, if the editors are 
obliged to fill up its pages entirely by 
themselves; and, naturally, every one is 
unwilling to take charge of it, if there is no 
one willing to assist. 

Then, too, it cannot be as entertaining as 
it would if more contributed to it; for in 
this, as in everything else, variety is nec- 
essary. Especially do we think that for- 
mer pupils should lend us their aid occa- 
sionally ; even a letter from them would 
not only serve to show their interest in 
the paper, but would also afford our read- 
ers much pleasure. The one great point 
which we have to urge, is, that the editor- 
ship for the last term should not be given 
to Seniors ; and we say it no more out of 
compassion for the Seniors, than for the 
paper. At a time when their own class- 
work — work which they certainly ought 
not to neglect — is sufficient to occupy all 
their time, they cannot give to their paper 
the time which it needs, and cannot do 
themselves justice. We hope, then, anoth- 
er year to see Seniors names on the editors' 
column for the first of the year, but not for 
the last term. 

There seems to be a growing tendency 
in school journals, to change the style of 
material for their columns, and by the 
insertion of long historical or literary 
articles, to go beyond the object of a school 
paper — which we believe to be school 
affairs and school interests. As before 
remarked, it is difficult to say farewell, even 
to hard work, and it is with regret we now 
say it for '78. Perhaps some of our read- 
ers, however, wil^ not regret it so much ; 
but we hope they have, in the main, been 
satisfied with our efforts to please them : 
that would fully repay us for our labor. 
And now with many thanks to all our kind 
friends, and very best wishes for the com- 
ing Leaves, we make our adieux, — edito- 
rial, — and retire. 



" Jenny, what makes you such a bad 
girl ? " " Well, mamma, God sent you just 
the best children he could find, and if they 
don't suit you, I can't help it ! " 



What do you think the beautiful word 
" wife " comes from ? It is the great word 
in which the English and Latin languages 
conquered the French and Greek. I hope 
the French will some day get a word for it, 
instead of that dreadful word " femme." 

But what do you think it comes from ? 
The great use of Saxon words is, that they 
mean something. Wife means " Weaver." 
You must either b3 housewives or house- 
moths ; remember that. In the deep sense, 
you must either weave men's fortunes and 
embroider them, or feed upon, and bring 
them to decay. Wherever a true wife 
comes, home is always around her. The 
stars may be over her head ; the glow- 
worm in the night ; cold grass may be the 
only fire at her foot ; but home is wherever 
she is, and for a noble woman it stretches 
far around her, better than houses ceiled 
with cedar, or painted with vermilion, 
shedding its quiet light far for those who 
else are homeless. This, then, I believe to 
be the woman's true place and power. — 
Buskin. 



" Don't put too fine a point to your wit," 
said Cervantes, " for fear it should get 
blunted." He spoke to men; if he had 
been addressing young women, he might 
have said : " Don't put too fine a point to 
your wit, for fear it should wound, rather 
than tickle." Men don't take kindly to 
the sharp, clever young woman who is 
always hurling her shafts of wit. They not 
only believe, with Shakespeare, that a 
" soft, gentle and low voice " is "an excel- 
lent thing in women," but that it should be 
accompanied by gentle manners and a tender 
heart. The Philadelphia Times utters 
thoughts about the too-clever young woman, 
the good sense of which makes them worth 
heeding : 

" Occasional indulgence in repartee with 
a bright man or woman is entertaining ; but 
if either insists upon carrying on the game 
unduly, it becomes a nuisance, and the per- 
sistent one lays himself or herself open to 
the gravest of all social charges — 'bad 
style.' " To talk with a girl who will do 
nothing but cut and thrust, and whose con- 
stant attack necessitates a constant defense, 
is a bore. Nobody cares to live continu- 
ously upon spiced meats. — Youth's Com- 
panion. 



LA SELL LEA VE S. 



A Boston paper says of Miss Parloa and 
her teaching: "Not only are the results 
good, but it is a pleasure to see her work ; 
there is no spilling or slopping, and no 
waste. Her school is a charming novelty, 
and of immense practical benefit; and it is 
all the better because Miss Parloa is per- 
sonally so pleasing, with quiet, winning 
manners, and entirely able to attend to her 
cooking and her class at the same time. 
Her school ought to soon become a normal 
school, where pupils can graduate as teach- 
ers of cooking. She begins at the very be- 
ginning ; not one thing is omitted or taken 
for granted, and any one who goes to her 
classes must learn." 

We were all sorry when our course of 
cooking lectures was finished ; for Miss 
Parloa had such an entertaining way of 
giving us the details of the kitchen, that it 
was a pleasure to hear her. From the 
copious notes taken during the course, we 
are sure much has been learned, and expect 
cooking will be one of our summer accom- 
plishments. 

The Girls not Equal to It. — While girls 
unquestionably have their uses in the 
economy of nature, and possess merits ex- 
clusively their own, it may be boldly as- 
serted that they are totally unfit to pursue 
in company with young men the studies 
which constitute the curriculum of every 
respectable college. One of the earliest 
studies of the Freshman year is the art of 
getting the janitor's cow into the top story 
of the dormitory. This can be readily 
mastered by any young man of good abili- 
ties and habits of industry and persever- 
ance ; but between girls and cows there is 
a great gulf fixed. The girl, from her 
earliest youth, looks upon the cow as a 
ferocious beast, prone to keep young ladies 
in the air in positions fatal to the proper 
arrangement of the back hair. To suppose 
that three or four young lady students are 
capable of the complicated pushing and 
pulling necessary to induce a cow to climb 
several flights of stairs, is to suppose that 
the natural feminine fear of cows can be 
eradicated by the mere process of matricu- 
lation. Thus we see that one of the easiest 
of college studies is quite beyond the 
range of the female intellect. — New York 
Times. 

Let him who gropes painfully in dark- 
ness or uncertain light, and prays vehe- 
mently that the dawn may ripen into day, 
lay this precept well to heart : " Do the 
duty that lies nearest to thee," which thou 
knowcst to be a duty ; thy second duty 
will already have become clearer. 



Carlyle's wife is described by Miss 
Stebbins, in her newly published biography 
of Charlotte Cushman, as a " clever, witty, 
calm, cool, unsmiling, unsparing " woman 
— a description she obtained from Miss 
Cushman, who knew Mrs. C. well. When- 
ever Carlyle himself got to talking at tea, 
with no indication of ever stopping, his 
wife would sit quietly listening, renew his 
cup, and sometimes drop a judicious word 
edgeways, to flavor the conversation. But 
when she was alone, and herself the enter- 
tainer, says Miss Stebbins, " one became 
aware of the self-abnegation she practiced ; 
for she was herself a remarkably brilliant 
talker, and the stores of quaint wit and 
wisdom which she poured forth, the mar- 
velous memory which she displayed, were, 
in the minds of many, quite as remarkable, 
and even more entertaining, than the majes- 
tic utterances of her gifted husband. It 
was said that those who came to sit at his 
feet remained at hers." — Ex. 



if true, he is an animal. But revelation 
discloses the fact, that this animal is not 
the man, but that there is a deeper self 
than constitutes the man. One is for earth, 
and earthly ; the other for heaven, and 
heavenly. In this other and supreme man, 
we find an answer to the question, " What 
is man?" Our present body and life are 
but temporary. We were born in the 
body, that by association with meaner life, 
we might enter into a higher existence. 
Humanity must be regenerated, and it is by 
studying the plan of God, that we are to 
know his method of salvation. At the 
close, the graduates were counseled fer- 
vently, reminded of the educational advan- 
tages of which they had been recipients, 
and urged ever to push upward and on- 
ward through life's journey, 



Cgmmsnetmenfc Week 

The exercises of Commencement week 
were inaugurated by the Baccalaureate 
sermon, preached by Bishop R. B. Foster, 
of Boston, in the Congregational church. 
He took for his text, Psalms VIII : 3 and 
4 : " When I consider Thy heavens, the 
work of Thy fingers, the moon and the stars 
which Thou hast ordained, what is man, 
that Thou art mindful of him ? " At first 
thought, man seemed but an atom in the 
universe, and thus impossible to consider 
him an object of Divine protection. After 
alluding to the beauty and grandeur of 
God's work in the earth and planets, the 
speaker said that the problem comes up. If 
the universe is considered as an uncommon 
scheme, what is man ? The Bible is full of 
revelations magnifying man, and account- 
ing him the noblest work of God ; and the 
whole plan of nature demonstrates the same 
fact. When studying the plan of God, we 
see that man has been always in his 
thoughts. God's system was founded for 
man's final good, and all arrangements of 
the universe culminate in the welfare of 
man. What is there in man that warrants 
this display of Divine humanity? There 
are two views of man's life. One regards 
him as he seems to be — born only for this 
terrestrial life — as one whose life is bound- 
ed by the cradle and the grave. The 
external seems to make up the whole 
substance of man's character and life. 
This view regards man as an animal ; and, 



On Monday evening, June 10th, the reg- 
ular Musical rehearsal for the end of the 
term took place. The programme was 
more than usually fine, and the performers 
made everybody proud of them. 

The concert was opened by a chorus, 
" Where Deepest Shadows Hover ;" but as 
this was sung by the whole school, it 
would not become us to compliment it 
further than by saying that it did credit to 
Professor Wheeler's drill and practice. 

Miss Hays played Beethoven's " Quanto a 
peu bello " with such a delicate, clear touch, 
that we could not help applauding her. 
Miss Stedman sang "I am a Merry Post- 
ilion," very sweetly ; but the first encore of 
the evening was given to Miss Potter, for 
her rendering of a beautiful Sonato in C. 
Major, by Hayden. Miss Dunsmore sang 
a lovely little "Cradle Song," and was 
followed by Miss Dickson's " Invitation to 
the Dance," which was appreciated by 
everybody — asLila's music always is. Miss 
Linscott sang "Judith " witli a great deal 
of power and expression, and was obliged to 
repeat it. Miss Tourjee played a Valse 
Tyrolienne, by Roff, very nicely ; and then 
Miss Miller gave us the "Prayer" from 
" Dey Freyschutz," a very difficult, but 
very beautiful piece of music, and executed 
in a way that we could not but appreciate. 

After a little time for rest and conversa- 
tion, Part Second was opened by a " Song 
without Words," by Miss Ferguson, fol- 
lowed by " Sing, Birdie, Sing," a very 
sweet little song, and nicely sung by Miss 
Tourjee. Miss Longyear played, with a great 
deal of expression, an Adajio in B Minor, 
by Mozart; and then Miss Ferguson sang 
"There is a Pair of Little Hands" so 
sweetly, that she had to return and give us 



6 



LA SELL LEA FES. 



"Longing." Miss Magoun's Sonata 
from Beethoven, was the gem of the even- 
ing, and was beautifully played. Misses 
Miller and Tourjee came next, with a 
duetto, entitled "Spring is Returning," 
followed by Niss Wiswall, who played 
Chopin's Polonaise, Op. 40, very finely. 
The evening closed with the parting song, 
written by Miss Moulton, and sung by the 
school. So, the last concert of the year 
passed very pleasantly, and the teachers 
and parents could not but be proud of the 
very evident improvement and advance- 
ment during the year, both in the instru- 
mental and vocal department. 



PARTING SONG. 

Swiftly are the moments fleeting 

As the time to part draws near, 
When the last link must be broken 

Of the chain that binds us here. 
Some there are among our number 

Who again will see Lasell ; 
Others now must pass forever 

From the school they love so well. 

Many pictures float around us, 

Telling of glad clays gone by ; 
Jewelled with Love's precious tokens, 

Set in Friendship's golden tie. 
But the future smiles before us, 

Pointing to the coming years ; 
"Ever onward," is the watchword, 

And we must not wait for tears. 

Though our paths be strewn with flowers, 

Thorns will grow among their bloom; 
And, as sunshine follows shadow, 

Daylight sometimes turns to gloom. 
But at last, each task completed, 

God will take us home to dwell 
In that land, where, all united, 

We shall never say, Farewell ! 



On the 11th, the entertainment by the 
pupils in Elocution and Music took place. 
The evening opened with a piano duo, 
" Polonaise," by Lorau, followed by the 
song, " Tell Me, Bird," very sweetly 
sung by Miss Miller. Miss Potter read 
" Charles Edward at the Court of Ver- 
sailles, on the Anniversary of Culloden," 
in excellent style, and with very fine ges- 
tures. Miss Hatch then played a beauti- 
ful Barcarolle in E, by our own teacher, Mr. 
Hills. Miss Linscott followed with a 
charming recitation of the " Little Black- 
eyed Rebel." Miss Ferguson sang the 
well-worn, but ever-welcome, " When the 
Flowing Tide." One of the great suc- 
cesses of the evening was the " Marche 
Hongroise," by Liszt, arranged for two 
pianos, rendered by Misses Hatch, Dickson, 
Ferguson and Wiswall. Miss Bourne read 



the " Rhyme of the Duchess May," by Mrs. 
Browning, not the anonymous " Rhyme 
of the Dutchess Mary," on the programme ; 
and Miss Hamilton rendered the pathetic 
" Ballad of the Shamrock " excellently 
well, while Miss Converse convulsed -the 
audience with laughter, by telling " How 
we Hunted a Mouse;" and the evening 
closed with the vocal quartette, "Beneath 
the Shade," by Misses Bowen, Ferguson, 
Miller and Stedman." 



This was a sort of field-day at Lasell 
Seminary, Auburndale, it being the first ob- 
servance of Class Day by the students. 
It being a new feature of Commencement, 
considerable latitude was given the young 
ladies for an expression of ideas, and the re- 
sult was a most enjoyable entertainment 
for the large audience which occupied the 
chapel. The exercises were opened with 
prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Jackson, of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Newton. 
Misses Magoun and Linscott then rendered 
Jensen's " Brautgesang," on the piano in 
a manner most gratifying to the audience 
which expressed its pleasure by hearty ap- 
plause. The "Salutatory," by Miss Jennie 
L. Darling, was an effort highly commend- 
able. The " Rhine Maidens," by Glover, 
was sung in a charming manner by Misses 
Dunsmore and Hamilton. The " Class His- 
tory," given by Miss M. Alice Linscott, 
was a bright and pleasing paper, the re- 
membrance of which will long be cherished 
by her classmates. " Allegro " Op. 26, 
by Beethoven, was rendered by Miss Ma- 
goun in a manner quite pleasing to her 
teacher and the audience. The " Advice 
to Undergraduates," by Miss Annie H. 
White, was replete with kindly feelings, 
the thought of which will keep the memory 
of the essayist fresh in the minds of those 
who follow her in the courses of study, un- 
til they, in turn, are called upon to perform 
the same pleasant duty. Miss Dunsmore 
followed Miss White with the song, " Kath- 
leen Mavourneen," and " Class Prophecy" 
was given by Miss Alice N. Magoun ; and 
while it was a very bright paper, affording 
much amusement for the graduates, the ful- 
fillment of the dream will hardly be real- 
ized. The last on the programme was the 
"Valedictory," by Miss S. Alice Duns- 
more ; and in taking leave of her classmates, 
schoolmates and teachers, she expressed 
for each the most kindly feelings and 
wishes for the success and happiness of all 
during the remainder of life. 



At the close of the exercises in the 
Chapel, the students marched to the lawn 
at the north of the Seminary, where the 
planting of the ivy took place. The ad- 
dress was made by the President of the 
day, Miss Margaret Hamilton, and the 
response by Miss Carrie Kendig, Class of 
'19. In the evening, at quarter before 
eight, the Rev. Mark Trafton, D. D., made 
an interesting address upon " The Social 
Status of Woman." He began by saying 
that he should endeavor to show that he 
was on the side of true reform and true 
women. The question of the day, he 
thought to be, What is woman's true 
sphere ? And he answered it by saying, 
that her true sphere, as man's, was where 
she could secure the most honor to society, 
and yet where she could be a woman still. 
Woman, he said, was not an unknown part, 
but a factor in society, and a true estimate 
of life could not be taken without her. 
She had played an important part in the 
drama of life, and why should she complain 
and ask for a re-arrangement of the social' 
relation ? If husband and wife would seek 
each other's happiness, and co-operate 
with one another as they ought, then all 
the hue and cry for a re-arrangement 
would be suppressed. He was, however, 
willing that women should be allowed to 
enter the various departments of life for 
which some now clamored, provided she 
could do so and keep within the bounds of 
womanly propriety ; and it was indeed a 
duty to encourage and stimulate all true 
ambition in this way. He closed with a 
strong plea for the restoration of the* lost 
art and beauty of domestic life as condu- 
cive to the welfare and happiness of all 
women, and as a solution, in a measure, of 
the intricate problem regarding the sphere 
and occupation of woman. * 



ifiiiailif Uses&iKs, Jit© IS* 

A pleasanter day could not have been 
desired, and the Chapel was filled with 
friends of the Seminary. The stage was 
occupied by the teachers and trustees. 
Above the Presidential chair was hung a 
shield, with the motto of the class, "Esse 
quam videri,''' scrolled upon it, and shields 
of all the other classes since 1854 around 
the room. The exercises opened with music 
by the Germania Band, after which prayer 
was offered by Dr. Clark, of East Boston, 
and the band played a fine selection. 

The Traveller gives the following report 
of the exercises. Miss Jennie L. Darling, 
of New York City, read a prospective 



L A SELL LEA FES, 



essay, entitled, "1978." She supposed, at 
that time, woman had become a skillful 
politician, and filled all the important of- 
fices. Woman suffrage had been adopted, 
and had become a powerful tenet of some 
great political party. All sorts of imagi- 
native wonders are to be reached a hundred 
years hence. There are to be trips to 
Europe in a day, voyages to the moon, 
and different kinds of "graphs" to per- 
form different kinds of work. All through 
the essay there was a sarcastic reference 
to the proper sphere of man. Finally, Miss 
Darling said, it was physical labor. Miss 
S. Alice Dunsmore, of Indiana, then read 
an essay on " The United States Currency." 
The title of the essay gives no idea of its 
substance, for it treated of character, hon- 
esty, truth, originality, and the other 
essential characteristics of a perfect man 
or woman. 

After another selection by the orchestra, 
Miss Margaret Hamilton, of Kentucky, 
read an essay on the " Poetry of Science." 
The essay traced the influence of nature on 
the different periods of life, until the end is 
reached, when it is as " real as the flow of 
the tides." The sciences of astronomy, 
botany and geology were then briefly noted, 
with the poetry that is in them. The essay 
closed with a well-selected poetical quota- 
tion. Miss M. Alice Linscott, of Portland, 
Maine, then read an essay entitled, " Noth- 
ing New under the Sun." The essayist 
spoke of the great discoveries that were 
made by that wise Grecian, Solon, and of 
his rescue from oblivion of the Iliad. He 
is the fountain-head of the learning of the 
nineteenth, as well as of former centuries. 
Women must be elevated ; but that will 
really be nothing new, for Hypatia, Cor- 
inna and other noted women have, in times 
past, become the vanquishers of man in 
many a noble struggle. This essay was 
argumentative throughout, and presented 
a delicate plea for woman. 

Following music, Miss Alice N. Magoun, 
of Bath, Maine, read an essay on the 
" Chosen Race," which was, as shown by 
the title, a review of the history of the 
Jewish race. The expulsion of the Jews 
from France, Germany and Austria, the 
massacre of Seville, in 1381, and the social 
persecution of the Jews in all times, have 
been unhappy. The Jew in literature has 
been a " grasping, clutching, covetous 
schemer," as in Shakespeare and Scott. A 
compliment paid to D' Israeli, by the essay- 
ist, awoke the Germania to applause. 
Josephus, Mendelsshon, Spinoza, Ilaine, 
Auerbach, and others of Hebrew descent, 



were spoken of briefly in passing. The 
essay was excellent as a historical resume. 
Miss Annie H. White, of Brockton, Mass., 
read an excellent essay on " Character as 
Affected by Surroundings." From indi- 
vidual she passed to national character, 
speaking of the liberty-loving Swiss, the 
easy Italians and the voluptuous French. 
It was loudly applauded, and was logical 
from beginning to end. After more music, 
special diplomas in Physiology of the 
Voice were presented by Prof. Wheeler, 
to Misses Dunsmore, Hamilton, Linscott 
and Magoun. The regular diplomas were 
then awarded by the' Principal to Misses 
Linscott, Magoun and White, from the 
Classical department ; Misses Darling, Duns- 
more and Hamilton, Scientific. 

Prof. Bragdon then addressed the class 
as follows : 

Young Women of the Class of 1878: 

This day, for which you have worked and 
longed — this day, which has been so bright a 
light, beckoning you on, and toward which you 
have looked with eager eyes, / have not wanted 
to come. I don't like Commencement Day. 
And as untiring Time has hurried us toward it, 
like a child that would stop a clock, that it might 
never be night, I have felt that I must seize his 
chariot wheels and hold them still. And if I 
read your hearts aright, even in all the joy of 
the hour, \ou, too, would gladly defer for a little 
the last words ; you, too, shrink somewhat from 
the last good-bye. But the time has come. You 
have done your work. You have your reward — 
not in those parchments, but in your character ; 
and you wait only the quick end of my feeble 
sentences to lay aside the short dresses of school- 
girl days, and don the long robes of alumnal 
womanhood. Long yon shall not wait. I have 
not much to say ; and what I have is not at all 
what I wanted to say. Nothing adequate can 
be said at such a time as this. You know my 
heart's desire, my hope for yon, by the daily 
record of the years that are now at an end. You 
know well how anxiously I have watched, and 
how earnestly I have prayed, as you have fought 
sore battles with yourselves. You know, too, 
how I have rejoiced with you in the greatest 
victories of your lives. Within these walls some 
of you have learned more than books can teach: 
you have learned that " he that ruleth his spirit, 
is greater than he that taketh a city." You have 
learned the weakness of a life without God, and 
have been led by His Gracious Spirit to yield 
yourself to His blessed law of love. Toward 
this home you will look back as the birthplace 
of your new life. The happiest thought we, 
your teachers, have today, is, that perhaps we 
have helped you conquer self and sin; and our 
saddest thought is, that we have helped you so 
imperfectly— that we've done so little. 

In earlier years, a well-meaning friend used to 
urge your Principal to join the ministerial ranks ; 
" because," said he, "you'll never get much of a 
place as a teacher unless you spell your name 
with Rev. My conscience recognized no such 
I felt my work to be to teach, 



not to preach. But I confess that since I have been 
in this school, I have felt it would be good to 
have some such authority. Many things I would 
like to say to my girls, at &uch a time as this, 
might find a deeper place in their hearts if the 
speaker had had the " laying on of hands." But 
being one with you in the great lay ranks, may 
I not speak to you as a brother, and hope that the 
emotions of the hour, and the hallowed sur- 
roundings of this day, — rightly great to you and 
to us, — will add to my words the weight they 
could not have from either their intrinsic value 
or an ex cathedra source. 

May I emphasize the entreaty which has been 
the most earnest you have heard in the talks to 
which you shall never again listen — to be genu- 
ine. In a Washington Street store I was shown 
samples of picture-frames. " I like this one,'' 
said I. " But you don't want that," said the 
man, who knew my tastes; "it is imitation." 
" But it is very pretty, and good imitation." "Yes ; 
but do you want imitation?" The world don't 
want imitation graces or virtues. I charge you 
to be real. Not at all because, as is often un- 
worthily urged, the world will some day find 
you out. Be real, because you despise anything 
unreal — because you won't, because you can't be 
anything else; because your conscience,— God 
in you, — the only judge worth considering — will 
always know what you are, and will not tolerate 
a sham. You cannot grow wide and deep and 
great, with any deception in you. Hypocrites are 
always trying to add to the hollow armor of pi'e- 
tense about them, a plate here, a boss or two 
there, a helmet above; but looking within, you 
see themselves growing constantly less. The 
very planning for such effect belittles, shrivels. 
Sham virtues have no wholesome influence. If 
you want to make the world better (if you do 
not you have no business to be in it), you must 
be genuine. No assumed goodness helps others 
to be good. 

But, young women, to be really good, 
you must be real Christians. I seem to see, in 
a quiet village of Olivet's Slope, a family group. 
On one the burdens of this life press heavily ; she 
is a hard worker, full of bustle, careful about 
many things. Another sits humbly at the feet 
of the Nazarene, and looks lovingly up into his 
face, as words of life drop into her hungry heart. 
As she looks and listens, the image, yea, the 
very life of the Son of God, is transfused to her 
soul. The surface-reading world calls one a 
thrifty housewife, and says she shall come to suc- 
cess ; the other a drone, and predicts rags for her. 
But He whose eye runs along the whole path of 
life, as it winds through both worlds, says : "She, 
this drone, hath chosen the better part." There 
is something more worthy the thought and time 
of immortals, than the cares of this transient 
sojourn. The Life is more than meat. Choose 
the better part. Give much time to the inner 
life — the real man of whom you heard so 
eloquently last Sunday. Be assured, He who 
gives all success, will see to it that such time is 
not wasted. Oh, my girls! be real children of 
our Father! There are too many smoothly-run- 
ning moral machines ; too many fair without, 
within unclean ; too many " almost persuaded ;" 
too many who come nigh, but never enter in. 
" They lack," the world says, " only one thing ; 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



that is not much." Yea, truly, God too said, 
"One thing thou lackest." But that one thing 
is essential, and that one lack fatal. But for the 
one thing, the young ruler " whom Jesus loved, 1 ' 
might have come down in history as a second 
Paul, as another John. Lacking it, and it only, 
he passes from Jesus' side into sadder than an 
eternal oblivion. 

Serve not as servants who look for their wages 
every Saturday night. God loves a cheerful 
giver. Be proud and glad that he lets you do 
with and for Him. 

Again,the name of the strait gate is Humility. 
Narrow it is, and low, but into what richness of 
experience does it lead ! 

Antaeus, gaining strength from every touch of 
his mother earth, is a type of every strong and 
useful life. The knee that lowest bends in 
humble prayer, is ever stiffest and sturdiest 
when Apollyon rains his blows upon the helmet. 
The more prayer, the less doubt. These are 
days, they say, of hard knocks upon every head- 
piece. But the reason is safe if the knees are 
supple. 

Remember that you, yourselves, make the 
atmosphere in which you move. Circumstances 
do not — fortune does not — friends do not. The 
world is a mirror. "If you bring a smiling vis- 
age to the glass, you meet a smile." If you 
scowl at it and grit your teeth, it will scowl and 
grit its teeth at you. If you laugh, it will laugh. 
The face and spirit are your own returned. 

Lastly, you go forth to fight and to work — I 
trust, with an ambition to do something noble. 
You must go alone. The record of our friendly, 
yea, loving work, for and with you, is in your 
hearts — in the memory of the happy, earnest 
days we have passed together; in the blessed 
seasons of prayer; in the holy hours of personal 
striving with you — and, perhaps, in the moral 
fibre you have gotten in your life at Lasell. 
But that is a thing of the past. Your friends can 
never do more than to feebly help you. You 
are women — do not forget it. 

Be willing to work in your own way, with 
your own tools. The hand that is trained to a 
trowel, adapts itself with difficulty and loss to a 
plane or a brush. Find out the line along which 
you can do the best work, anil follow it thank- 
fully and steadily. The Lord doesn't make 
folks smart. He gives hands and feet and brain 
and soul — all as clumsy as an infant's ; and with 
these abundant opportunities to work, they 
who will, make themselves smart, strong, able. 
Thank God, not for an easy place, not for kind 
friends, not for a smooth path, but for tools to 
work with — a field, and a chance to make your- 
selves what you will. The world will respect 
and remember you, not for what you plan or 
dream of, but for what you accomplish. There 
is as good material in you as in any six beings 
He has ever placed in this work-a-day world. 
It depends on you, and you only, just as you are 
to-day, not such as you dream you are some day 
going to be, whether or no the world shall re- 
member you in the life to which this is your 
Commencement Day — upon you, whether your 
names are coupled with blessings— whether or 
no the world fifty years from now is better for 
your living. 

Draw back for no weakness, for the Almighty 
has promised to be your strength. Hesitate for 



no ignorance, for the Omniscient has promised 
to be your wisdom. " The only thing God can't 
master is an " I will not." As your day, so shall 
your strength be, if you only abide in Him. 

We believe you will; we expect much of you. 
Broader field never had mortal. See to it that 
no fond prophet of your youth has reason to 
regret his predictions of your futures. 

Class of 1878, the Seminary sends you forth to 
represent her. You bear her name — you must 
protect her honor. With this responsibility we 
give you our full confidence, and pray God's 
blessing on you each and all. 

The exercises having closed with the singing 
of the class hymn, written by John L. Stoddard, 
pupils and friends mingled socially for half an 
hour, and then at one o'clock dinner was served, 
picnic fashion, on the lawn in front of the Sem- 
inary. 

MEETING OF THE TRUSTEES. 

At 2.30 the trustees held their annual meeting, 
and elected officers as follows : President, Cap- 
tain M. B. Tower ; Treasurer, George R. Eager ; 
Secretary, E. W. Gay; Executive Committee, 
E. F. Porter, E. M. Fowle, G. F. Kimball, A. I. 
Benyon, M. B. Tower. The Board passed a vote 
of thanks to the Congregational Church for the 
use of its place of worship. The trustees also 
passed a vote expressive of their appreciation of 
the services of the Principal, and of their good 
wishes for him during his vacation trip in 
Europe ; and they placed funds in his hands for 
the purchase abroad of pictures and statuary for 
the Seminary. 

The Alumnje. 

The Aluninas held a business meeting at 2.30, 
and elected officers as follows : President, Mrs. 
J. Lasell; Vice-President, Mro. C. E. Parker; 
Recording and Corresponding Seci'etary, Miss 
Minnie Gilmore; Treasurer, Miss Angeline C. 
Blaisdell. An hour later, the exercises of the 
Alumnas were held in the Chapel. They opened 
with prayer, an organ solo, and a welcome by 
the President ; after which " Elsie's Child" was 
read, by Miss Grace I. C. Perley, '76. The pro- 
gramme continued with a piano solo, by Mrs. 
Isabella G. Jennings Parker, '57; essay, "The 
Faerie Queen," by Miss E. U. Clark, '70; read- 
ing, by Mrs. Mary M. Ames Tucker, '58. The 
exercises closed with the singing of a re-union 
hymn, written by Mrs. C. E. Parker, '57. 

Principal's Reception. 

In the evening, the Principal held a reception, 
which was attended by a very large number of 
ladies and gentlemen. From eight to nine 
o'clock, persons arriving paid their respects to 
the Principal, while the Germania Band enter- 
tained the company; and at the latter hour, 
refreshments were served. Later, there was 
promenading until after ten o'clock, and then the 
pleasures and duties of th,e day and year closed. 

CLASS SONG OF '78. 
BY JOHN L. STODDAKD. 



O shadowed aisles of loved Lasell, 
Dear guardians of our happiest years, 

While now we breathe a fond farewell, 
We greet you through a mist of tears. 



Though bright the future's cloudless sky, 
And sweet the perfume of its air, 

There trembles on our lips a sigh, 
To leave a spot so loved, so fair. 

To-day, as one, we walk the shore 
Of life's vast ocean all untried; 

To-morrow, swiftly gliding o'er 
Its bounding waves, our paths divide. 

Beyond the shelter of the land, 
Life's duties, like huge billows, rise 

And mark, with gesture of command, 
The way which o'er their surface lies. 

Yet fear we not ! Life's boundless main, 
By steadfast hearts, is sailed unharmed ; 

Aim but the noblest ports to gain, 
And every rising wave is charmed. 



I D. CO 



AGENT FOR THE 



t It t 



i 



—AND— 



CATERER, 

No. 8 Province Court, Boston. 



Ice Cream of a Superior Quality Furnished at 

very Reasonable Hates. 

Wedding and other Parties served with care 
and promptness. 



II 





A 




■I5IWSH! 

IS A HUNDRED DOLLARS !EARNED. 



Every family can save from 

FIFTY TO ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS 

Every year, by buying their TEAS and Family 

Stores at 

C. D. COBB & BRO'S. 

GROCERY AND TEA HOUSE. 

We are confident that every one will be convinced, that 
the above statement is true, by a little calculation, after 
comparing our prices with those they are paying at other 
places. 

GOODS DELIVERED 

FREE OF CHARGE. 

All orders for Twenty-Five Dollars and 
upwards, for a general assortment of goods, 
shipped at one time and directed to one 
person, or a club of several families, wil 
be CAREFULLY packed and delivered by 
freight at the DEPOT in the place where 
they reside, provided it is within One Hun- 
dred Miles of Boston, 

FREE OIF aiH:.AJR,GKE_ 



LASELL LEAVES. 



9 



T> 



Successors to John Hall, 



Wholesale & Retail Dealers in 



DOORS, 

SASHES, 



BLINDS, 




MARBLEIZED SLATE 

MANTELS, 

AND SHELVES. 



177 and 183 BLACKSTONE STREET, 



< i 



C. D. Densmore. 



(Near Haymarket Sq.,) 

BOSTON 



C. K. Brackett . 



iTOBE, 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

ESP ECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 



R' 



All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 
DOh'T FORGET THE PLACE, 
JAMES "VI O KLEINS, 
Auburn St., Auburn dale. 

L A. ELLIOT k COMPANY, 

(Late Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes,) 
Importers and Dealers In 

Studies, and other Works of Art, 

At Wholesale and Betail. 
Picture Frames Made to Order. 

594 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

Next Door North of Globe Theatre. 
Enclose Five Cents for Catalogue of 2500 Engravings. 

J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS., 

DEALER IN 

FANCY e~OOD 

NOTIONS, TEIMMINGS, 

And a good Assortment of 

Ladies' Goods and Small Wares 

[ALSO AT NEWTON LOWER FALLS.] 

Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, 

Crockery, Glassware, Flour, &c, &c. 

Meal & Grain, Wholesale & Retail. 

AgencyforMme. Demorest's Reliable Patterns 



$ 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 

CHILDS, FULLER & CO., 

Wholesale & Retail dealers in 

GAS FIXTURES, LAMPS, KEROSENE GOODS, &c 

Agents for Perkins & House's Safety Lamps. 
No. 680 W ASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

J". IKLISrO^ATT-iIES; dfc SONS, 

Wholesale ami Ketail Dealers in Fresh. Smoked a. - Pickled 

FISH; also, CLAMS, OYSTERS and SCOLLOPS, 

Cod Liver Oil, Lobsters, Quabaugs, Pickerel Bait. 

All kinds of Fish Sold on Commission. 

Stalls, 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MAKEET, BOSTON, MASS. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 

A. G-. PATCH & CO. 

Dealers in 

FIOIT AHD VEGETABLES, 

Cranberries, Dried Apples, Pickles, Beans, &c. 
Cellar No. 1 New Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 



ALFRED BRUS 
APOTHECARY, 

Auburn Street, (facing Grove), Auburndale, 

Physicians' prescriptions accurately dispensed 
at all hours. 

CH&RLES A. T. BLOOM, 

TAILOR, 

Chambers, 433 Washington St., 
Nearly opposite Summer Street. BOSTON. 

FRED. H. THOMAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS 

Particular attention paid to Family Trade. 
No, 9 Boylston Market, Boston, 

IRVING BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH, PURE COUNTRY 

MILK. 

Citizens of Auburndale aud Vicinity furnished with 

any quantity desired. 

P. 0, Address, Auburndale. 

PMOMB & MOODY, 

FASHIONABLE 37 West Street, 



J 



STATIONERS, 



BOSTON. 



Wedding & Visiting Cards. 

Our Boxes of Correspondence Cards and Envelopes are 
elegant and inexpensive. 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Irtisti' Material 



Of Every Description, 



NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




Oriental Tea Co. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Betail Dealers in 



T E A 



3> 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE. 

The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 




10 



LA SELL LEA VE S, 



[Established 1847.] 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON. 



rfatiowra and Manli 



oolt ffanufacfurm 



First-Class Account Books of any desired, 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN S. GAT 

Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Ceiitemiial), 1876. 



^pami Phafflgragljeii^ 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



PLUTA & HILLS, 

PftOYISIOU STOUE, 



AUBURNDALE, 



4&±.\4>\A% 



Constantly on band, first-class Meats, Fresh and SAM 
with Fuesh Vegetables in their season. 

4Sf Goods delivered free of charge. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Of all kinds, including 

Lacroix's Tube Colors 

For painting on China, &c. 
AT WHOLESALE AJVB BETAIL, 

AT LOW PRICES. 

WADSWORTH BROS. & ROWLAND, 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Painter)*' $upf>lie£, &ftijft£' Materia, 

A XT) 

ARCHITECTS' STATIONERY & INSTRUMENTS, 
76 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



SWAN" «3c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, dec. 



No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 



HENRY SWAN. 
S. B. NEWTON. 



BOSTOM. 



HENRY F. MILLER, 



BOSTON, MASS. 

The Instruments from this establishment are guaran- 
teed to be finely made and to prove reliable and durable. 

H. W. ROBINSON & CO., 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Paper Hangings, 

MILLINERY AND SMALL WARES, 

EVERYTHING AT THE LOWEST PRICES. 

H. W. Robinson. B. Sanford, Jr. 

WATERS & INMAU, 

■WEST ISTE-WTOISr AND AUBUHNDALB, 

DEALERS IN 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe, 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 

FRANK WOOD, 
STEAM PRINTER, 

S82 Washington Street, 

Nearly opposite Bromfield Street. BOS1 ON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

j~os:e:f>:e3: "W- OIF^IG-G-, 

Manufacturer of and Sealer in Enameled Slate 

lilTLES AND BBACKEf SIEi¥I§, ETC, 

Also, English. Floor Tile. 

Roofing Slate and Papers, Parlor Grates, Frames, 

Summer Pieces, Registers, etc. House Slating 

and Repairing to order. 59 Bromfield 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

THE EAGEB MANUFAOTUKIrTG COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo.R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad " Pants and Overalls, 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

JAMES P. MAGEE, 

AGENT OF THE 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

Mottoes, Reward Cards, Velvet and Passe-partout Frames. 
38 BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON. 

A. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 

Commission 

Fruit and Produce Dealers, 

7 New P. H. Market, & 93 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Andrew J. Harrington. 

NICHOLS dfc H^_T_iT_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLAKE BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 

AV. H. FRENCH & CO. 

Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 

OUDSON'S BUILDING, 

CHESTNUT STREET, West Newton, 

Opposite R. R. Depot. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

Boo t J*»> Hto®©e & IM&&@frtS 

BEPAIEING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street. AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



GODDARD & CO., 

Importers and Retailers of 

Dress' Trimmings, French Flowers, Hats, Laces, 
Rnchings, Ties, Gloves, Corsets, Un- 
derwear, Hosiery, and 
Worsted Goods. 

HATS TRIMMED TO ORDER. 
39 "WIHSTTEm STREET, 



THOMAS HALL, 

MANUFACTURING ELECTRICIAN and OPTICIAN, 

Manufacturer, Dealer, and Importer of 

Telegraphieal, Philosophical, Mathematical, Optical, 

Galvanie, and Chemical Instruments 

of all Descriptions. 

Dealer in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instru- 
ments. Wire, Batteries, Materials, &c. Hall's Patent 
Electric Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-houses, hotels, 
Factories, Steamboats, Banks, and Railroad Depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Established in 1835. See Halt's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



ADVE RT IS ERS 



Will consult their interests by obtain* 
ing an estimate from the undersigned 
before closing their contracts. 

FOR 




INFORMATION 



Concerning the relative value of news- 
papers, their circulation, advertisinr 
rates, &c, 

ADDRESS, 



T.C. EVANS.252 Wash ingtonSt.Boston 



From Paine's Illustrated Price-List. 




^|llillf[|||||||||IMIIII||l|flllll|IIlll Illllllllll^ Ilii 



No. 5. 



No. 10. 



No. 5 BOOK-CASE. 

Eight feet two inches high, four feet six inches wide 
French Burl Panels, Carved Brackets, $45.00. 

No. 10 ENGLISH DRAWER SECRETARY, 

Eight feet four inches high, four feet wide, $55.00. 
No. 11, same style, plainer, $45.00. 

Also, at equally low prices, some twenty styles and sizes 
of Book Cases and Secretaries, from $25.00 to $250.00. 
Some very elegant. 

Paine's Furniture Manufactory, 

141 Friend and 48 Canal Sts„ 

BOSTON, MASS. 





XDTT^Sl FZElVLIISr^. FAOTI." 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., OCTOBER, 1878. 



Number 1. 



CARPETS! 

JOHN H PRAY, SONS t CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

In New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, wo can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



1J. W-'liW i. 



BOSTON. 



The morning of the 19th of June dawned 
bright and clear, and at half-past eight 
a. m. the Canada sailed slowly out of 
New York Bay. Of course, we intended 
to have a good time, so ensconced our- 
selves comfortably in our steamer chairs, 
with books, lemon and bottle of salts in 
hand. However, before we had been out 
an hour, one and another of the passengers 
disappeared below, uutil but few were left 
who were not victims of sea-sickness. This, 
however, did not last long, and we were 
soon on deck, enjoying all the pleasures of 
an ocean trip. Our evenings were spent, 
chiefly, by singing, promenading and chat- 
ting ; and days, by reading and writing. 
Fourteen days passed pleasantly this way ; 
and, after custom-house examinations and 
a short ride on the cars, we found ourselves 
in London. Here we remained a week, 
visiting St. Paul's Cathedral, Westminster 
Abbey, the British, South Kensington and 
National Museums, Zoological Gardens 
and other places of interest, then started 
for Germany. Of course, we all expected 
to be sick crossing the Channel ; but none 
of us were, and when we reached Antwerp, 
were feeling in extra good spirits. 

It was here, in the Cathedral, that we saw 
Reuben's celebrated painting, the " De- 
scent from the Cross." Remained here but 
a short time, and went on through Brussels 
and Cologne, staying but long enough to 
ride around the cities. At Cologne we 
took a Rhine steamer for Mayence. The 
scenery of the Rhine is very pretty, yet 
does not surpass that of the Hudson. At 
Mayence we at once took the train for 
Heidelberg. A ride of twenty minutes 
from the depot brought us to the Schloss 
Hotel, which is situated on a hill over- 
looking the city, and very near the Castle. 
We remained here over Sunday, and early 
Monday morning left for Lucerne, arriving 
there in the evening. The ride through 
the St. Gothard Pass was enjoyed by every 
one ; and yet we were thoroughly glad 
when it was over. At Locarno we took a 
steamer for Lake Maggiore and Arona, 
then the cars for Milan. 

Here, in the Victor Emanuel Gallery, we 



saw Da Vinci's celebrated painting, "The 
Last Supper." At Venice we remained 
three days, and enjoyed every minute of 
the time. Visited St. Marks ; and it 
was in this Cathedral that we saw a bit 
of the skull of John the Baptist, and 
a vase containing blood of the Saviour ; 
the Doges Palace, where we saw the 
largest oil painting in existence, Tintor- 
etto's " Paradise;" and, by applying to 
the guide, we were allowed to pass through 
the Bridge of Sighs, into the prisons ; the 
church of the Franciscans, where are the 
tombs of Titian and Canova. At Florence, 
we visited the Pitti and Ufizzi galleries, 
Cathedral, Baptistry, and took an evening 
drive through the gardens of Florence. 
From Florence to Rome, in which city we 
remained ten days, and visited nearly every 
place of interest. At Naples, visited the 
National Museum, shopped, and most of 
the party ascended Vesuvius as far as the 
Observatory, while others went to the ex- 
treme top. At Piza we visited the Lean- 
ing Tower, Campo Santo and Cathedral. 
Through Turin to Geneva, where we re- 
mained three days, going from there to 
Chamonie in post-carriages. We enjoyed 
this ride as much as any we had while 
abroad; and when Mount Blanc loomed in 
sight, we could not find words to express 
our admiration of the scenery. No one 
who has not seen it can ever imagine how 
grand is the sun-rising and setting on 
Mount Blanc. 

We arrived in Paris during a rain-storm ; 
and as none of us were feeling in very good 
spirits, the fact of its raining did not cause 
them to rise many degrees. We remained 
in Paris a week ; and, of course, visited the 
Exposition, which, when compared with 
the Philadelphia Exposition, rather falls 
into the background. 

The Louvre, Notre Dame, Napoleon's 
tomb, Versailles and other places of inter- 
est were also visited, and we at length 
started for London. Before leaving Paris, 
however, some of us, knowing that there 
was a long journey before us, purchased an 
abundant supply of French pastry, to be 
eaten on the cars This was done: but. 
when we were fully out in the English 
Channel, we had to pay dearly tor our 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



"high living," as we were very seasick. 
We remained but a short time in London 
this time, and then proceeded on through 
Scotland, stopping at Windsor, Oxford, 
Leamington, Stratford-on-Avon, Chester 
and Melrose, where we visited Melrose 
and Dry berg Abbeys, and Abbotsford, Sir 
Walter Scott's home. In Edinburgh we 
remained three days, and visited Edinburgh 
and Hollywood Castles, and then went on 
through the Trosachs. This ride through the 
Trosachs was enjoyed very much by all. 
We remained one night in Glasgow, and left 
early the following morning for Liverpool, 
by the way of the Clyde River ; and the 
next day following that, by nine a. m., we 
were on board the '' Queen," which was to 
bring us home. At six o'clock the steamer 
started, and we were finally on our way 
home ; and although we had had such a 
pleasant trip, and were sorry to leave Eu- 
rope, none were sorry to turn their faces 
toward home. None of us were seasick 
until the third day ; but then — well, I will 
leave the sensation to your own imagina- 
tion. Profiting by experience, we knew 
better than to remain below, so stayed on 
deck, through all kinds of weather. The 
fourth day out, there were but four of the 
ninety-six cabin passengers down at din- 
ner. 

The fifth day out was just perfect — a calm 
sea, and the sun shining gloriously ; but 
after that, the next five days were very 
rough. One rough day we were all sitting 
in the center of the deck, when the ship 
gave an awful lurch to one side, and away 
we rolled to the side of the ship. One of 
the number, never thinking that the ship 
would lurch to the other side, started to 
walk back to her chair, when the ship 
righted herself, and this young woman sat 
down — on a plate, some say, though I do 
not believe it — and rolled back to where 
she started from. 

The morning of the thirteenth day we 
entered New York Bay ; but there were 
custom-house papers to be signed, trunks 
to be packed, and "goodbys" to be said, 
so it was eight o'clock before we could 
land. Although our friends were on the 
wharf, they could not come to us until our 
baggage had been examined. 

No trip could have been more admirably 
planned and carried out than ours ; and we 
thanked the kind Providence for keeping 
us safe and well through our three months' 
sojourn in the Old World. 



Bit.. 

" Oh, loosely swings the purpling vine, 
The yellow maples flame before; 
The golden-tawny ash-trees stand 
Hard by our' cottage door. 
October glows on every cheek, 
October shines in every eye ; 
While up the hill and clown the dale 
Her crimson banners fly." — Scribner's. 



The latest sensation : " Name the Presi- 
dents of the U. S." 



Two beautiful pictures bearing the above 
titles hang side-by-side in an American art 
gallery. The scene of each is laid in the 
same place, a village of Holland, as we 
know from the narrow streets, high, plain 
buildings, and the general air of all its 
surroundings. 

The still twilight hour is stealing gently 
over the first picture, softening the hard 
lines of care in the faces of the elder peo- 
ple, and even subduing, to some degree, 
with its influence, the noisy, romping chil- 
dren. On the right side a young girl can 
be seen, leaning from her window, making 
a fair picture of youthful beauty, in contrast 
to the grim, rugged outlines of her home. 
She is listening intently to the whispered 
words of her lover, who stands in the street 
below ; and we can tell, from her burning 
cheeks and bright eyes, that he holds no 
small part of this woman's heart Across 
the street, quite a party of young folks 
have assembled, and are gaily chatting; 
while not far from them a group of merry 
children are dancing to the sound of a bat- 
tered fiddle. Down the center of the street 
the more sedate fathers and mothers are 
passing to their homes, happiness and 
sweet content plainly visible on their hon- 
est faces. A shepherd, folding his flocks 
for the night, completes this picture of rural 
freedom and joy. 

Now let us turn to its companion-piece. 
Here is the same village street ; here are 
the same square, ungarnished buildings ; 
the same sky is above. But the scene — oh, 
how changed ! Dark midnight wraps her 
mantle about the earth, hiding from the 
glare of the sun, in her pity, the forms of 
suffering mankind. The moon, just strug- 
gling through a bank of dense, black clouds, 
throws over the picture a ghastly light, 
which is caught by an open-mouthed 
cannon in the background, and reflected 
with almost equal intensity. The woe and 
ruin wrought by this agent of destruction 
are all too plainly evident on every side. 
Battered walls, wounded men, weeping 
women, tell the story at a glance. In the 
place of dancing children, we have now a 



heap of men, bruised, bleeding, dying, 
while sad-faced nuns are kindly striving, in 
every possible way, to alleviate their pain. 
No blushing maiden leans from the window 
opposite ; but, far removed from this sight 
of men, a heart-broken vfoman bewails the 
fatal day when the brave boys of the town 
resolutely encountered their foe. 

Such is the change wrought within a few 
short hours ; and life, with its many and 
varied phases, is thus faithfully portrayed 
in these two wonderful pictures. 

From infancy upward, how many talks 
and lectures we have heard on this subject 1 
It has been drilled into our heads at school, 
and at home our wise mothers have con- 
sidered it one of the most important things 
in our education. Yet have we profited by 
all this counsel ? The consciences of many 
of us would shrink from the question. We 
should make it one of the highest aims of 
our lives to always perform our work with- 
out delay, and to avoid becoming fixed in 
a habit of procrastination, which, once 
formed, will make us its slave forever. 
Many a failure and many a long illness has 
resulted from causes which might easily 
have been controlled if taken in season. It 
is truly said that "Procrastination is the 
thief of time." Of course it is natural to 
all of us to glide along the ways of life as 
easily as possible. If some demand upon 
our energy comes to disturb the general 
routine of our lives, it is hard not to say, 
" Oh, that can be done some other time." 
It is from just such little neglects that the 
habit of delaying is formed. 

We must strive earnestly to guide our 
ways, so that in old age we shall not have 
to look back upon our younger days with 
regret, and think, "Oh, if I had only im- 
proved my time ! " 



Although you may have been away 
from Lasell for many years, you surely 
have not lost your interest in the school, 
and, we know, desire to help us in any- 
thing in your power. 

By subscribing for our school paper, you 
will not only enable us to continue its 
publication, but will also keep yourself 
well informed concerning the progress 
made at Lasell. And you " old girls," 
who have attended the school more recent- 
ly, wish to know how the school affairs 
progress. And how can you possibly 
know so well as by reading our paper? 

So send your names, one and all, imme- 
diately. 



LASELL LEAVES 



Apples ! 

" Jevons says so ! " 

" Well, I believe you ! " 

"Tell me, ye winged winds," where 
that gyroscope is ! 

Roasting chestnuts over the gas is a los- 
ing business. Ask Mattie ! 

All persons about to start for Europe, 
please take notice ! The latest style of 
locomotion on board the steamer is by way 
of a "plate." 

The Seniors' strong points: "Rule of 
undistributed middle " and "the first point 
in Aries !" 

Anyone in need of patterns for fancy 
work, can be immediately accommodated 
by calling at No. 3 Happy Hall. 

When a "solemn Senior" makes a fifth 
vain attempt to throw a banana-skin from 
the ground to a second-story window, it is 
certainly high time for something to be 
done. 

The organ-grinder who recently paid us 
a visit, seemed to be of a decidedly relig- 
ious turn of mind, judging from the style 
of music in which he indulged. But when 
he began to wail out "Portuguese Hymn" 
— for, it seemed to us, the fifteenth time — 
his audience retired in disgust. 

Our enthusiastic archers have made 
several desperate attempts to hit the 
"bull's eye;" but there must be something 
the matter with their arrows. 

Several of the girls' brothers have called 
upon them. They expect their " cousins" 
soon ! 

Our school is full to overflowing this 
year, even the "Forum" being occupied 
by four high-minded damsels. 

The doctor's business is not very thriv- 
ing at present. Reason : chestnuts are 
over ! 

Let no one be astonished if a certain 
well-known Senior is conditioned in Astron- 
omy, at the end of the tern), on account of 
forgetfulness ! 

The European tourists have returned to 
us in good health and spirits. The Conti- 
nent seemed to agree with them, judging 
from the general gain in avoirdupois. 

The greatest excitement we have had as 
yet on these classic grounds, was a run- 
away, one Friday afternoon. Quietness 



reigned supreme, as is usual in tins hamlet, 
when suddenly a crash was heard, and a 
horse appeared upon the scene, prancing 
over the lawn, utterly regardless of croquet 
set, targets or rustic-seats. In the back- 
ground an overturned carriage and two 
rueful-looking masculines, completed the 
picture. We presume the barking of a 
dog across the way was the immediate 
cause of the disaster. 

Scene : Saturday, 2.30, p. m. Maidens 
fair standing about in the halls, or leaning 
out of the windows, in a state of mind much 
resembling that of our friend " Micawber." 
Suddenly, a rumbling is heard in the dis- 
tance, and an open barouche, drawn by two 
fiery steeds, dashes up to the front door. 
One grand rush is made for the piazza, 
front windows, or any point good for 
observation. After waiting just long 
enough to produce a decided sensation in the 
minds of the "lookers-on," five sedate (?) 
young women and Miss T. appear, are 
handed into the aforesaid chariot by the 
yellow-gloved driver, and, without a mo- 
ment's warning, are hurried from our 
astonished vision. Did those girls have a 
good time, or not? Consider the molasses 
candy, the modest youths of Newton, the 
style, etc., and then answer me, oh, ye 
boarding-school girl or boy ! 

Please " dash a few lines off " for us ! 

The first candy-pull of the season came 
off one Saturday evening, not long ago, 
and was such a decided success, that some 
of the "little girls" are already clamoring 
for another. 

The last night in October was spent in 
the usual manner by our "young women." 
Arrayed in gymnastic suits, they descended 
to the gymnasium, where all the mystic 
symbols usual to Hallow E'en were tried, 
with variable success. Dancing, and 
a "good time generally," occupied the 
rest of the evening ; the programme clos- 
ing, as usual, with the Virginia Reel. 

" Coffee and pistols," please, for the 
two Juniors who insist upon " raising the 
banner." 

Query : What is the size of a person's 
orb, who requires a twenty-five inch eye- 
piece in a telescope ? 

Lost : a book of poems, belonging to 
Miss Bowen. The finder will be suitably 
rewarded, by returning the same to No. 3 
Happy Hall. 



News of old girls and teachers is earnestly 
solicited. 

Miss Lizzie Emerson, a Lasell girl, has 
obtained a position as teacher in the gram- 
mar school of her home, Gloucester, Mass. 
Success to Lizzie ! 

The Juniors have generously " widened 
their borders," and added Miss Minnie 
Hopkins to their "immortal four." The 
Wisconsin member bids fair to be an orna- 
ment to her class, and an honor to her 
Alma Mater. 

Miss Jennie Hays, our former school- 
mate, is now attending school in Philadel- 
phia. We sincerely regret her absence, 
but wish her much happiness in the year 
to come. 

Miss Emma Bacon, of Bridgeport, Conn , 
who would have graduated in the class of 
'78, is now spending her time in learning 
the mysteries of telegraphy. 

As far as we can learn, the girls of '78 
are ladies of leisure this winter, with 
perhaps one exception ; for we hear that 
Alice Dunsmore has actually become quite 
an expert housekeeper — thanks to Miss 
Parloa, no doubt. 

We are sorry to inform our readers of 
the dangerous illness of Mrs. Dr. Monroe. 
Her kind face is well remembered by the 
old girls, and it saddens us to know that a 
former member of our faculty is so ill. 

We are pleased to learn that Miss Mary 
Hall, of Marlborough, Conn., one of our 
former teachers, is achieving such a suc- 
cessful career in studying law with Judge 
Hooker, of Hartford. We wish her all 
prosperity in the future. 



Ill/" 

Lou Howe is attending Dr. Gannett's 
School ; Lila goes to the Normal ; and our 
"contralto" adds the charm of her pres- 
ence to Chauncey Hall. 



!irii@f Q£&bs Sosg B 

" I want to be a Senior, 

And with the Seniors stand, 
A ring upon my finger, 
An essay in my hand." 



To Subscribers: — Please send in your 
order for papers at once, that there may be 
no delay or mistake in sending them. For 
information on the subject, adddres Miss 
Inie G. Sanford, Subscription Agent, 



4 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE — 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

EDITOR, 
CARRIE KEND1G, '79. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
CORA B. FLINT, '79- ANNIE M. HOLBROOK, '80. 



PUBLISHER, 
L1LLIE R. POTTER, '80. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '80. MINNIE HOPKINS, *8 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 



One Copy, one year (including postage), 75 cts. 

Single Numbers, ----- 10 cts. 



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Dbafr." 



As it may be needless for us to remark, 
school has commenced again, and we heave 
a great big sigh as we gather up our books 
preparatory to another year's work. A 
sigh, not exactly of relief that the warm, 
enervating days of summer are gone, nor 
on the other hand, of satisfaction that we 
have returned to labor of heart and brain ; 
but such a sigh as naturally wells up from 
the heart in autumn, when the leaves are 
changing color and dropping. Surely, no 
more gorgeous display of foliage was ever 
seen than enchants the eyes of us Lasellites 
this fall. Drink in some of the beauty of 
these glorious days, girls, and store it up 
for the winter just at hand. Through the 
kindness of our principal, "we girls' 7 have 
enjoyed several excursions and numerous 
minor trips, which have proved highly 



beneficial to both mind and body. " Out- 
door exercise is the passport to health and 
happiness," so Prof. B. informs us; hence, 
the occupation of rustic seats in clear 
weather, the use of croquet set, bow and 
arrows, rubber balls, etc. But let our 
more dignified neighbors understand, that 
while we are thus wisely increasing our 
physical strength, the training of mind and 
heart is by no means neglected. We are 
full, full to the very brim, of hearty and 
enjoyable work. For proof, just observe 
the grave and reverend Senior, as she pours, 
hour after hour over her incomprehensible 
logic, or busily traces starry constellations, 
with the aid of teacher and telescope. Or 
ask Miss B. if she has not a sufficient 
proof of our statement in the remarkable 
enthusiasm of her chemistry classs. Even 
the face of a "prep." goes to prove our as- 
sertion, especially if she has forgotten 
whether Calcutta is in Prance or Egypt, 
and geography is the next recitation. Oh, 
ye burdened school-girls, how like mount- 
ains these troubles appear to you now, 
which in a few years will have passed en- 
tirely out of your memory. 

School opened on Thursday, September 
19, with every desk occupied. The faces 
of all the old teachers greeted us as we 
entered the Chapel, and together our voices 
arose in prayer and praise to the Giver of 
all good things. It was a goodly company 
that assembled for morning prayers that 
day ; but many of us sadly missed the dear, 
familiar forms that had been wont to glad- 
den our hearts by their presence in days 
" lang syne." 

To the old girls who may chance to read 
this first copy of the Leaves for 1878-19, 
let us say, " We miss you ! " Do our 
hearts creep into the words, and do you 
understand their deep, and, to a casual 
observer, hidden meaning ? How strange 
it all is — this meeting and parting! You 
may have dropped out of our lives as 
schoolmates, but, be assured, the sweet in- 
fluence of daily contact and Companionship 
still remain, and will continue to do so 
until the end of time. 

The faces that seemed so strange and new 
to us a month ago have become familiar 
to us now. Is it too late to say " wel- 
come " to the new girls ? If not, we extend 
to you each and every one the right hand 
of friendship and good-will ; and may we all 
long be members of this same school-home. 

Before laying aside pen and ink for 
another month we wish to make brief men- 
tion of a new departure in our school 
system, entirely different in character, 



however, from the one of last year. The 
time had just about arrived for the first of 
our dreaded monthly examinations, when 
one morning, after Chapel worship, our 
principal startled and delighted us all by 
saying, " We have decided to do away 
with written examinations — at least for the 
present." The thought of our teachers in the 
matter is about this, and it seems to us a 
remarkably sensible one : The absence of 
examinations will stimulate the careless 
student to better daily work; for now she 
will have no opportunity to make up at the 
end of the term by " cramming," what she 
has not done in good, steady work. While, 
on the other hand, the persevering worker 
will be duly appreciated, and will be saved 
the unnecessary woriy attendant upon either 
oral or written examinations. Thus schol- 
arship will be judged from each day's work, 
and not from one Herculean effort, which 
might tire the brain and tax the memory 
beyond the limit of human endurance. 
An example of this kind just now occurs to 
us : A young man was about to graduate 
at West Point. Through all the years of 
his hard study he had kept at the head 
of his class, bravely overcoming every 
obstacle in his way, and by the most per- 
sistent effort retaining the coveted position. 
And now Commencement time was draw- 
ing near, bringing with it the usual amount 
of mental and physical strain. 

At last the morning of examination 
dawns, and the students assemble, well 
realizing how much depends upon this 
final test. The first question is put by the 
examiner to the subject of our narrative, 
and, as he rises to answer, the full force of 
his position flashes suddenly upon him : 
honor, position, friends, if he is successful; 
disgrace and irreparable loss of a desired 
position under the Government, if he fails ! 
His head reels ; the overtaxed nerves give 
way, and he falls, fainting, to the floor. He 
is borne to his room, where, for many a long 
week, anxious friends watch over the life 
that has come so near to death's door. At 
last he is able to leave the sick-room — but 
with a shattered constitution, and a future, 
which had before looked so bright and 
pleasant, now as dark as the night of hope- 
lessness can make it. 

No words are needed to complete the 
picture we have drawn, and no arguments 
to prove what is thus almost daily trans- 
piring about us. Suffice it to say, that we, 
as a school, are about to try a new and 
original method, which we hope and expect 
will fully answer the purpose for which it 
is intended. 



LAS ELL LEAVES, 



What a worthy genius was that which, 
one year ago, inspired the minds of Lasell's 
young women to found that illustrious lit- 
erary and secret society whose members 
bear so proudly the mystic symbols,"S. D."! 

Owing to the crowded condition of the 
school, we have been obliged to relinquish, 
for a time, our pleasant society-room, en- 
deared to us by so many happy recollec- 
tions of times past, when the Forum was 
crowded, and there was many a lively stir. 
We miss some old familiar faces, but the 
present is all in all to us now. 

Fifteen new members have already en- 
listed in our ranks, and the Seminary parlors 
resound weekly to the determined exposi- 
tion of feminine opinion. 

At the last election the following list of 
officers was chosen for the ensuing term of 
office. President, Miss Lovering ; Vice- 
President, Miss Flint ; Secretary, Miss 
Hopkins; Treasurer, Miss Garland ; Critic, 
Miss Baker ; Usher, Miss Converse. 

To all our old friends we can give a full 
assurance of our present prosperity ; and to 
those who are here for the first time, we 
give our earnest advice to lose no time in 
becoming connected with a regularly orga- 
nized society, the benefits of which hardly 
require repetition. 



On Saturday evening, September 21, was 
held in the parlors of the Seminary, the 
first sociable of the season, the old stu- 
dents acting as hosts, and welcoming the 
new ones. The rooms were decorated with 
autumn flowers, and over the mantle-piece 
they were woven into a wreath encircling 
the word, " Welcome." Besides our own 
numbers were present several friends from 
the village and abroad. Soon all was life ; 
and, as is usual with our girls, it did not 
take long for them to make the acquaint- 
ance of those who were to be members of 
the family this winter. Some of our friends 
favored us with pleasing musical selections, 
and we were all glad to see Miss Hatch 
once more presiding at the piano. Consid- 
erable time was spent in games, the most 
enjoyable of which seemed to be, "Once 
there was a Quaker." We received much 
profit, as well as pleasure, in examining, 
through a very fine glass, the pictures that 
Miss Carpenter had procured in Europe. 
Hut this, as all good times, must draw to a 
close, and at a late hour we retired to our 
rooms with recollections of one more even- 
ing pleasantly spent. 



On the 26th of September, we were fav- 
ored with another one of those delightful 
excursions which both Prof. Bragdon and 
Prof. Dole so often plan for our enjoyment. 
A few days previous it had been known 
that such an event was to take place, and, 
as each day passed, the sky was watched 
with eager and anxious eyes. On the 
above-named day the sun rose in all its 
brilliancy, the clouds were a perfect white 
on a blue sky, and everything seemed to 
promise a good time. At about half-past 
two in the afternoon, a happy crowd of 
scholars and teachers might have been seen 
exercising their muscles in boating on the 
Charles River. After a delightful row of an 
hour, in which all the beauties of nature 
were fully enjoyed, we landed at Tangle- 
wood, and were kindly received by Mayor 
Fowle and his wife. The first thing which 
attracted our attention was the lovely flow- 
er-beds. They were laid out in many dif- 
ferent styles, and showed a great deal of 
taste and care. The hot-house also con- 
tained many choice flowers and plants, 
which seemed to be in a flourishing condi- 
tion. One of the amusements of the day 
was a parrot. I am sure if he had been 
given something to eat every time he said, 
"Polly want a cracker," he would have 
been in his grave long ago. Notwithstand- 
ing the flattering appearance of so many 
young ladies, he utterly refused to sing a 
note. He was the possessor of so noisy a 
laugh, that I am afraid it would be woeful 
to his peace of mind to be found roaming 
arouud the classic halls of Lasell. 

We were kindly invited into the house 
to look at the paintings The walls of sev- 
eral rooms were completely covered with 
them, and they were mostly the works of 
master artists. Here was a lovely land- 
scape, and there a beautiful head of some 
renowned person. It would be almost 
impossible to describe our different feel- 
ings, as we wandered from room to room, 
and gazed upon pictured scenes hung 
before us. Lost in dreamy thought, we 
could almost imagine that the spirits of the 
masters themselves were hovering round 
us. Loth to leave, we lingered in the 
tasteful grounds, or sat in some summer- 
house or rustic seat. But the time for 
departure came at last, and the boats were 
again filled with passengers for the return 
trip. 

As we floated home in the sunset glow, 
our hearts were full of memories of the 
pleasant afternoon, and of gratitude to 



those who had been the means of giving 
us so much pleasure. 



Mic-toies Exhibition, 

Some of us were much disappointed, on 
looking out of the window Saturday morn- 
ing, October 12, to see the rain pouring 
down in torrents ; for we were to go into 
Boston, to the Mechanics Exhibition, that 
day, and we feared the rain might prevent. 
But we decided not to be afraid of a little 
water ; so, equipped with waterproofs, 
umbrellas and rubbers, we started for the 
city at eight o'clock. 

On arriving there, we had but a short 
distance to go before reaching the Exhibi- 
tion building, which is on Columbus Ave- 
nue. Entering, we left our wraps at the 
entrance, and then started to see what 
could be seen. At the first glance, one 
would almost imagine himself in the main 
building at the Centennial Exhibition ; but 
on looking more closely, it will be seen 
that everything is on a much smaller scale, 
and is less imposing. 

One side is almost entirely occupied by 
machinery, which we did not stop to ex- 
amine. There is a gallery running all 
around the building, and at one end is the 
Art department. It has been said that the 
Art collection is very inferior. Some of 
the pictures were, indeed, so poorly ex- 
ecuted that we wondered to see them 
there ; while others were so beautiful, it 
seemed to me no one could find fault with 
them. 

We saw athousand-and-one things which 
it would be impossible to mention in this 
short space. We spent four hours at the 
Exhibition, and then started for home, all 
agreeing that, in spite of the rain, we had 
had a very enjoyable time. 



One Wednesdaj', advantage was taken 
of the unexceptional weather, to make a 
trip to Mount Ida. A " goodly" portion 
of the girls, accompanied by Prof. Bragdon, 
started at 2.30 p. m., arriving at Mount 
Ida in about an hour, the additional 
length of time taken being chiefly spent at 
that point of interest opposite the depot, 
where, we trust, our conduct reflected credit 
on the Seminary. During the time profit- 
ably spent by the young women hero, 
some of the teachers, we noticed, disap- 
peared. 



6 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



It has since, however, been satisfactorily 
explained, by supposing they rested at 
a door beyond. On reaching the summit 
of Mount Ida, all felt repaid for the long 
walk and time spent in waiting. The 
atmosphere was clear, and gave an excellent 
opportunity for obtaining a good view; 
and the scene was one never to be forgot- 
ten. Nature truly looked her lovliest, and 
" Autumn, with many a gold-flecked leaf," 
was gorgeous. 

Obtaining the view, as we did, at sunset, 
we had the foliage and surrounding country 
flooded with golden light, as far as the eye 
could reach. Besides these many points of 
interest, far away, could be seen ; Cam- 
bridge, Somerville and Boston being 
clearty visible. 

Reluctantly and lovingly the sun seemed 
to leave this outpost of summer, as we left 
it that day. 



'WS \M Ml 

Taking the train bright and early Satur- 
day morning, we started for a visit to Hull. 
Arriving in Boston, we walked from the 
depot to the boat-landing, on the way 
replenishing our baskets with fresh fruits, 
etc. 

The steamer left the wharf at half-past 
nine, with a very delighted and happy party 
of girls on board, especially as it was to 
many, coming from the West, the first sight 
of salt water. The morning was bright 
and cool, and Boston Harbor proved its 
right to being called one of the most beau- 
tiful bays in the world. 

Passing between Forts Winthrop and 
Independence, we were enabled to under- 
stand why our country is called so strong; 
for, certainly, passing there during war- 
times would not be a very pleasant pros- 
pect. A little further on, the story of Dix's 
Mate was listened to, and this little spot of 
land was immediately transformed to an 
object of wonderful interest. 

We landed at Hull — not a very imposing 
town, but looking as though it might be 
cool and pleasant in the summer. Half a 
mile farther on, we visited the signal-station 
of Boston Harbor, and were very much 
interested in the examination of its use 
and mode of working. Here, after enjoy- 
ing an excellent lunch, some of the party 
remained, while the others walked around 
Point Alderton, the entrance to the harbor, 
and found themselves on Nantasket Beach, 
in full view of the broad Atlantic. As this 
is a very fashionable place of resort, and 
much visited, there is no need of our de- 
scribing or praising it. 



The tide was coming in, and quite 
a number of the party entered into the 
spirit of the occasion, and took a sea-bath. 
Although rather late in the season for such 
a demonstration,' the salt water lived up 
to its reputation, and gave no one of us a 
cold. 

After gathering many beautiful shells 
and specimens of sea-mosses, and 'writing 
our names on various rocks, we walked 
back to Hull, where we found the remainder 
of the party equally loaded down with 
" souvenirs." 

Here, on a hill overlooking the entire 
harbor, the sea, Boston, and many smaller 
places around, we ate a second lunch, with 
a great relish, after our exercise. 

The numerous amusing incidents always 
attendant upon such an excursion, are bet- 
ter imagined than described, from want of 
space. 

Taking the steamer at Hull, we started 
for home at four o'clock, on the way pass- 
ing a Government ship and several vessels 
bound for foreign shores. Leaving Boston, 
we arrived home just in time for dinner. 



PiMiillig Association. 

The Lasell Publishing Association held 
its first regular meeting for the year, on 
the evening of September 28. Several 
new members were admitted, and officers 
for this term chosen as follows : President, 
Miss Carpenter ; Vice-President, Miss 
West; Secretary, Miss Thompson; Treas- 
urer, Miss Curtis. 



Oue new telescope has at last arrived, 
and is pronounced, by good judges, a 
" perfect beauty." It is mounted in ma- 
hogony and brass, and has three different 
eye-pieces — a celestial, a terrestrial and a 
sun-glass. 

Not many days after its arrival, the 
whole Astronomy class might have been 
seen assembled on the lawn, making the 
most frantic efforts to discover some new 
sun-spots, or at least to see those which 
have already been discovered. 

Almost any night now, these interesting 
young women may be seen star-gazing, 
after the most approved fashion. 

Scientists will do well to keep an eye on 
the Leaves, as we shall endeavor to keep 
our readers thoroughly posted in regard to 
late discoveries, or the formation of new 
Astronomical laws. 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer ,in 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 

LITOLFFS CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



In stock, a great variety of handsomely-bound books for 
the Holidays. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN MED ! 
A LADIES LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No. 30 Avon Street, Boston, 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Paeties served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 

100 DOLLARS SAVED 

Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

G. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 

BOSTON . 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea, 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 
Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, .... $9.00 
Pure Cream Tartar, . . . . .40 cents 

Pure Cassia 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger, 12 cents lb. 

Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1 00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses, 60 cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



G. D. GOBB & BROTHERS, 

726 and 728 Washington Street. 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. 



L A S E L L L EA V E S. 



WEBER PIANO. 



The first choice of every Great Vocalist, Pianist 
and Musician in the World. 



READ WHAT THEY SAY. 

"For tlie last six years your pianos have been my 
choice for the concert-room and my own house." — 
Kellogg. 

"I feel that every one is fortunate who owns a Weber 
Piano, because of its rich and sympathetic quality of 
tone."— Car Y. 

"I shall take every opportunity to recommend and 
praise your instruments."— Nilsson. 

" I have used the pianos of every celebrated maker, but 
give yours the preference over all." — Patti. 

"Your Uprights are extraordinary instruments, and 
deserve their great; success." — Lucca. 

''Your instruments surpass my expectations, and I rank 
you justly as the foremost manufacturer of the day." 
— Murska. 

" Your instruments have no superior anywhere. I 
certainly have not seen any pianos in America which 
even approach them " — Goddard. 

"I am not surprised that every great artist prefers the 
Weber Pianos; they are truly noble instruments, and 
meet every requirement of the most exacting artist." — 
Careno. 

"Your pianos astonish mo; t assure you that I have 
never yet seen any pianos which equal yours."— Strauss. 

"Mme. Parepa called your pianos the finest in the 
United States. I fully endorse that opinion. They have 
no rival anywhere." — Wehli. 

"Amongst the many excellent pianos made in the city, 
the Weber ranks the foremost." — Mills. 



WAREROOMS: 



FIFTH AVENUE, cor. SIXTEENTH ST., NEW YORK, 

3 BEDFORD STREET, BOSTON. 



W. G-. BAKER & CO. 

Window Shades, Upholstery Goods, Curtain Materials, 

LACE CURTAINS, 

DRAPERIES, ETC. 
23 Bromneld Street, Boston. 



f 



jM 1 * vk* |f'y¥V> W* I 




AUBURN DALE, MASS. 
Office Hours: 9-12 A. M. ; 1.30-5 P. M. 

SWA INT <Sc J\TEWTOJ>a\ 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Fanenil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

S. B. NEWTON. 

AUBURKDADE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Cnnned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 



MEAL AND GRAIN WHOLESALE & ItETAIZ. 



BRANCH CROCERY STORE, 
BOTTON BLO0K, NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASS. 



Agency for Mme. Demorest's Reliable Patterns. 




AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will And a choice 
Stock of Goods of the veiy best Quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

■8®*A11 orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

JAMES VICKERS, 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 



N. G. WOOD & SON 

Mtmlm mi sitomimtlf*, 



M4 Washington Street, 



Boston, 



Next door to .Jordan, Marsh & Co's. desire to call special 
attention to their large and beautiful stock of fine goods, 
consisting iu part of 

Diamond Ear-Drops, two stone, from $50 to $1000 per pair. 

Diamond Rings, set in 18 kt. gold, from $25 to $200. 

Gent's Diamond Pins, from $25 to $200, Ladies 

Lace Pins and Lockets, set with Diamonds, 

All of the best quality, which are selling at a very small 
advance from the cost. 

Also, an entire line of fine Gold Jewelry, Ladies' and 
Gents' Waltham Watchks, fine Gold Chains, Gokhim 
Silver Ware of every description, Silver Plated Ware 
from the best manufacturers in the country; French 
Clocks, Bronzes, and every other kind of goods usually 
found in a first-class Jeweiry store. 

All our goods marked in -plain figures, 

WM. WEST <5c CO. 

7 HANOVER ST,, BOSTON, three doors from Court St. 
Manufacturers of 

Pure Confectionery & Superior Wedding Cakes 

All kinds of Cake, of the finest quality, at wholesale 
and retail. 



J. H. ROBINSON & CO. 

Formerly Gregory & Robinson, 

Importers, To'b'bers arxd. ISetailers 
— OF — 

FORE /ON AND AMERICAN 

Paper Hangings, 

406 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 

JOHN H. ROIUNSON. 

CHAS. H. WH1TMARSH. 
CHAS. W. ROBINSON. 

FOB1IQM BOOKSTOBI, 

Very large stock of School and Miscellaneous 

Books, in ancient and modern languages. 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 
(Successor to Schoenhof & Moeller), 
40 Winter St., Boston. 

CROSBY & FOSS, 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS, 

Have Removed to 

421 WASHINGTON STUFF, 

Fifth store north of Winter Street. 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




USE THE ELEVATOR. 

PORTRAIT S 

In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon and Inlt. 

C. M. LITCHFIELD. w. LORING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Artists Material 

Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




ORIENTAL TEA CO. 

87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



coffee:. 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburndale, free 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LASELL L EA V E S. 



Abram French & Co. 



IMPORTERS OF 



C, IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII -Wr * */ 
iBOCKERY 

CHIN A, 

GLASS WARE AND FANCY GOODS, 

SILVER-PLATED WARE, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



89, 91 & 93 FRANKLIN STREET, Corner Devonshire 



ABEAM FKENCH. 
JOHN T. WELLS. 
L. E. CASWELL. 



|boston^ 



L. G. COBURN. 
TO, A. FKENCH. 
S.WALDO FRENCH. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 

PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



COPYING 

In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

Stationers and lank jfook Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAT. 



EDWIN W. GAY. 



N 



OTMAN 



yvi 



^2Ph oio0rapher 1 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CA.MPBELL, PARK STREET. 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 



THE EAGER MANUFACTURING- COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Fasts and Overalls. 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

3STIO£3I01_iS cfe; E3Z-A_T_iI_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufao nrers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street. - - - BOSTON. 
G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

II©®;igg) nils©.®' <ib lillti§ 

REPAIEING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDAIE, MASS. 




C. SARGENT BIRD, 



Patent Medicines, Fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 

rUSKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST, AUBURN-BALE, MASS, 

FRANK WOOD, 

—STEAM PRINTER— 

No. 352 Washington Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and Scliool Work. 

^WHITE, SMITH & CO. 

51G Washington Street, Boston, Music Publishers 

and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 

and Piano Studies, both Foreign and American, 

Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 

Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also 

Publishers [of "The Folio," the grea« 

Musical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

W. D. LATHROP, 

AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK & BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, WOOD, HA Y, STRA W, LIME, 

Cement, Plaster, Hair and Drain Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 
WEST NEWTON -and- AUBURNDALE, 

Chapin & Anderson^ 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 

UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 
BOSTON. 

THOMAS HALL, 

Manufacturing Electrician and Optician, dealer 
in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instruments, 
Wire, Batteries, Materials, etc. Hall's Patent Electric 
Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-house-, hotels, factories, 
steamboats, banks, and railroad depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 
Established in 1S35. See Hall's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



Frames, 

. Engravings, 
Albums, 

Passe-partouts, 
Etc., Etc. 

C. A. PERKINS & CO. 

Successors to 
COLLIER & PERKINS. 



Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 

LADIES AIV» e£NXL£H£IV 

Visiting Boston, either on business or pleasure, shonld 
not fail to call at 

Larned & Oo.'s new and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

413 Washington Street. 

EMILY METCALF, M. D. 

Corner Main &. Moody Streets, WALTHAM. 

Office hours, 1 to 5 p. m., and evenings usually. 



H 



F>LUTA 



DEALER IN 



PROVISIONS, 

CUE. AUBUEN & LEXINGTON STS, 

FURNITURE 

IMPORTED EXPRESSLY FOR 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S GIFTS. 

USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL. 

Now on Exhibition at Paine's Warerooms, 141 Friend St. 

PRICE-LIST, Wholesale and Retail. 
Bouquet Stands, new designs, $2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 15, 25, SO, to 

$50. 
Bible Stands, useful and ornamental, $4, 5, 8, 1C, 15, 18, 

20, 30, to $75. 
Pedestals, French, $7, 10, 15. 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and $50. 
Jardinieres, of most beautiful designs, entirely new 

styles, $5, 10, 15, 25, to $35. 
Work Tables, very pretty, new patterns, $2, 5, 8, 10, 12. 

15, 20, 25, $10. 
Writing Desks, convenient and elegant, $12, 15, 20, 25, 30. 

35, 50, 60, to $150. 
Camp Chairs, in every style, $2, 3, 3.50, 4, 6, 7.70, 8, 10, to 

$50. 
Folding Chairs, a very useful present, $6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 

18, 25, 30, to $45. 
Music Portfolios, Racks and Screens, $6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 

25, 30, 35 to $75. 
Clocks, French and Americau, $2, 2.50. 3. 5, 7, 8, 9,10, 12, 

15 and $25. 
Bronze Ornaments, French, $2.50, 4, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35, to $65. 
Alabaster, for Mantel Ornaments, from Italy, 50c, $1, 2, 

3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 16, to $35. 
Marqueterie Tables, from Paris, $30, 45, 75, 125, 150 and 

$200. 
Parlor Tables, very rich, $15, 18, 20, 25, 35, 45, to $100. 
Brackets new styles, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, 2, 2.50, 2.75, 3, 4, 5, 

6, 7, 8, 9 and $10. 
Fancy Reception and Turkish Chairs, $8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 

17, 19, 25, 35, 50, to $85. 
Foot Rests, $5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, $15. 
Blacking Cases, Black Walnut, with Drawers and Slide, 

$5, 5 50 and $6. 
Etageres, most elegant, $28, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, to $125. 
Parlor Cabinets, from Paris, $55, 75, 125, 150, 175, 250 and 

$300. 
Hanging Flower-pot Holders, $1.50 to $15. 
Piano Stools, $5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, to $50. 
Card Receiver*, $3, 4, 6, 8, to $25. Aquariums, $15. 
Shaving Stands for dressing-rooms, $15, 20, 25, 35, to $50 
Girls' and Boy's Chamber Suites, $22, 25, 28, 30, 35, to $75. 

Works of art, it> figures and bas reliefs, from Copen- 
hagen, making a most wonderful display, which we are 
now selling at the very lowest importing prices. 



141 Friend Street, ^ 48 Canal Street. 

J. S. PAINE.- 





TDTJJSL FEMINA PAOTI." 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE. MASS., NOVEMBER, 1878. 



Number 2. 



CARPETS! 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS * CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

In New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carnetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, ns we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, we can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



IV 



Beautiful faces are those that wear — 
It matters little if dark or fair — 
Whole-souled honesty printed there. 

Beautiful eyes are those that show, 

Like crystal panes where hearth-fires glow, 

Beautiful thoughts that burn below. 

Beautiful lips are those whose words 
Leap from the heart like songs of birds; 
Yet whose utterance prudence girds. 

Beautiful hands are those that do 

Work that is earnest and brave and true, 

Moment by moment the long day through. 

Beautiful feet are those that go 
On kindly ministries to and fro — 
Down lowliest ways, if God wills it so. 

Beautiful shoulders are those that bear 
Ceaseless burdens of homely care 
With patient grace and daily prayer. 

Beautiful lives are those that bless — 

Silent rivers of happiness, 

Whose hidden fouutains but few may guess. 

Beautiful twilight, at set of sun, 
Beaut i fid Igoal, with race well won. 
Beautiful rest, with work well done. 

Beautiful graves, where grasses creep, 
Where brown leaves fall, where drifts lie deep 
Over worn-out hands — oh, beautiful sleep! 



LitteWs "Living Age." 



M?ailsgis if a Wlo,te speat Sa tie 



BOSTON. 



We who have been born and bred in the 
country, shrink with horror from the din 
and roar of city life. Like our ancestors 
before us, we have been reared in the old 
homestead, and probably have not traveled 
more than ten miles in our lives. 

We have only a faint idea of what city 
life is. It is there, we think, all bad habits 
are formed ; all foul deeds committed ; and 
that we could not spend even a short time 
in this abode of crime and misery, without 
feeling its results in all our after life. 

But because we have always been kept 
in a narrow sphere, and have never seen 
any of the good of the city or obtained any 
of its advantages — is that any reason why 
our sons and daughters should not do so ? 
Very often they are possessed of the ma- 



terial which, if molded into its true form, 
would make some of the greatest men and 
women of the day. 

If we are poor, let them work their own 
way up, as many a man has done before. 
Self-reliance will make them strong, and 
better fit them for the struggle of the 
world. 

Let us lay aside all prejudice, and con- 
sider what advantages we would gain by 
spending a winter in the city, and in what 
manner we should gain them. We could 
obtain a house in a quiet part of the city, 
where we should be free from all noise and 
strife. Of course, our sons and daughters 
should at once be placed in the best of 
schools, and a certain course of study laid 
out for them. We should obtain access to 
some good library, and every week take 
out such books as will improve and 
strengthen our minds. 

Books of travel are very interesting ; and 
to read the life of George Washington and 
other great men of our country would be 
not only beneficial and instructive, but 
would afford us much pleasure. We do 
not wish to be too dissipated, but we are to 
improve all our time, and things must be 
taken as they come. It is hard to choose, 
out of so many lectures, what ones to at- 
tend ; but after hearing the subject of a 
lecture, a person can quite often tell if he 
thinks it will be instructive and interesting. 
Once having heard James T. Field and 
Mary Livermore lecture, we would never 
miss the second chance. They are so en- 
thusiastic, and so commanding in their per- 
sons, that they hold us almost spellbound. 
At a lecture we should always attend 
closely to the speaker, and it is often well 
to take notes. 

We cannot hear good speakers and lec- 
turers without deriving some benefit from 
them. It widens our sphere of knowledge 
and affords us a topic of conversation in 
society. Most persons experience a great 
deal of pleasure in hearing first-class read- 
ings ; and surely they can find them in the 
city. Mrs. Scott Siddons, Helen Potter, 
and many others will entertain an audience 
for hours with their humorous and pathetic 
readings, and at the end the hearers will 
not feel the least fatigued. Hearing others 



LASELL LEAVES. 



read cultivates our taste, and teaches us, 
even in ordinary conversation, to speak dis- 
tinctly. Both vocal and instrumental mu- 
sic are essential to a complete education. 
In the city we can attend all the grand 
concerts. We do not miss hearing our 
prima donna. Clara Louise Kellogg, with 
her grand soprano, and Anna Louise Cary, 
with her beautiful alto, will delight us for 
hours ; while the fine music of the Thomas 
Orchestra cannot be surpassed. We must 
not forget to mention the picture-galleries 
which all cities contain. Here great ad- 
vantages are afforded to students of art ; 
and a well-educated person enjoys nothing 
better than spending a day among elegant 
paintings in our first-class galleries. 

We folks who have been brought up in 
such a way that we cannot instill the ad- 
vantages into our own minds, and still 
think there is nothing to be gained, that 
we will not come out better educated men 
and women, let us not deprive our chil- 
dren of things which will make them use- 
ful members of society, and help them to 
leave behind a name revered and honored, 
by the world. 



Bi&atsi to &s Ssatoffs, Ij II© Glass 
ef "80. 

We Juniors saw our future well, 

When from " 27 " there fell 

Six voices loudly speaking : 
" The year will speed on flying feet, 

And soon the Senior class must meet, 

To think upon some badge ' real sweet! ' " 
" Shall it be a ring, or charm P " 
" A cross, or bracelet for the arm? " 
" An ear-ring, cuff-pin, locket, chain? " 
*' But we must look out in the main 

That we don't pay loo much ! " 

When we our Junior work have wrought, 
" Six souls, with but a single thought," 

Our class-badge we will have bought; 

For we're so cute, we don't get caught! 
" Fighting!" 



'•Died, Nov. 2d, at 1 r. M.,in Bell Rock, 
Mass., Dr. Anna Monroe." 

It was with sorrow that we heard of the 
death of one of our true, noble women, 
Dr. Anna Monroe, Lasell's former physician 
and friend. The kindly words which she 
had for every one, have often encouraged 
many of us ; and her sweet Christian influ- 
ence was not without weight here. Dr. 
Monroe will long be remembered by us 
with love and respect ; and although mourn- 
ing our loss, we cannot but feel glad in the 
thought that she is now rid of all pain and 
suffering, and gone to be with the Saviour, 
whom she has served so faithfully while 
hero below. 



"Married: On the 20th. inst., at the 

house of the bride's father, Miss Margaret 
A. Sanders, of Southbridge, Mass., to Mr. 
Charles Lincoln, of Hartford, Conn. Of- 
ficiating clergyman, Rev. A. B. Kendig, of 
Worcester, Mass." 

So another Lasell girl has " gone the 
way of all the world ! " This was no small 
affair, as the following facts go to prove : 
Caterers from Boston, house finely deco- 
rated with flowers, grand music, and all 
other accompaniments of a " wedding in 
high life." The bride was radiant in a 
cream-colored silk, procured for the occa- 
sion from the old world, and heavily 
trimmed with point applique lace. Miss 
Starks, Class of '76, stood up with the fair 
" Maggie," and we doubt not many a 
looker-on would have made the wedding a 
" double " one, had it been in his power. 
The bridal presents were numerous and 
very handsome, the usual number of silver 
butter-knives and castors being presented. 
Old shoes enough to set up quite an estab- 
lishment in that line, were thrown after the 
retreating couple. One boot actually accom- 
panied them to the depot, having landed 
on the top of the coach. Good-wishes, 
however, did not end here, for one of the 
bridesmaids tossed a baby shoe into the 
open car window where the happy couple 
were seated. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln are to reside in 
Philadelphia ; and we wish them many 
happy years together. 



)omg gQhc 



ItaMsMis, 



Age. — Average age of the school, 17 1-3 
years. The youngest of our " young 
women " is 14 years, and the eldest one, 
22. We warn you, privately, not to say 
anything to the latter about her age, for 
she is very sensitive on that point. 

Weight. — Average weight, 115 1-2 
pounds. The lightest weight is 92 pounds, 
and the heaviest is 151 pounds. This last 
weight belongs to one of the young women 
in the Senior class. You girls who have 
any slight grudge against the said .class, 
beware of her, for she almost exceeds 
Samson in strength. 

Height — Average height, 5 feet 3 1-2 
inches. The shortest young woman is 
5 feet, and the tallest one 5 feet 6 3-8 inches. 
Lucky we have some one to keep up the 
reputation of the school. 



Qii? totogss, 

We welcome our old exchanges as very 
desirable, and almost necessary, adjuncts to 
the Reading-room. The following have 
thus far been received: "The Tripod" 
and " Vidette," from Evanston ; " Oberlin 
Review," " News Letter," " Exonian," ' ' The 
Greylock Monthly," "Literary Notes," 
"Dickinson Liberal," and "Chronicle." 
Also the "Woman at Work;" from the 
South, the "Crimson," and "Tufts Colleg- 
ian," and the " Beacon," from the "Hub." 

We are glad to number among our 
new exchanges the " Central School Jour- 
nal," published at Keokuk, Iowa. Many 
hints valuable to both teacher and pupil 
may be found in it. The article entitled 
"How to Commence School," especially 
attracted our attention ; and many of its 
spicy sayings and pithy remarks are well 
worth remembering. 

Several copies of " The Canadian Spec- 
tator " lie on our table. Literature from 
the good Queen's realm is always gladly 
received ! 

What could a girl do less than welcome 
"The Reveille" as an exchange? We 
judge from the copy now before us that 
this paper will prove an invaluable addition 
to our Reading-room. 

We shall eagerly consult "The Oracle" 
each month for complimentary (?) remarks 
concerning our sex. 

With pleasure we add to our exchange 
list "The Juniata Sentinel and Republi- 
can," and the "Maine Parmer;" for although 
we have little need of agricultural knowl- 
edge just at present, it is well to prepare 
for an emergency. Also, "The Southern 
Collegian " and the " Richmond College 
Messenger." Guess we shall not quarrel 
seriously, even though we are staunch 
" Northerners ! " We add, too, the " Acad- 
emy, " from Salem. 



AtWatioB. 

Who knows what is for sale in the little 
brown cupboard, in the room between the 
parlor and office ? We, of course,- know 
there is a book and stationery store there ; 
but who ever thought of going there for 
ribbon, fans, pictures, cord, perfumes, 
tooth-powder, soap, and almost anything 
else girls ever want ! Now, if you want to 
see a stock of nice goods, call there a little 
before eight in the morning, and not many 
will go away empt}'-handed. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



"That's all ! " 

The most popular French phrase of the 
day is "j'ai" ! 

"There was a stone on the Hudson." 
Was there, indeed ? Thanks for your val- 
uable information ! 



Prof. 



Miss 



-, how many vocal 



chords are there ? " Miss (taken unawares), 
*,' Fourteen, sir ! " 

Our lectures in Vocal Physiology are 
progressing finely. We have reached 
the " Posterior-Crico-Arytenoid" and the 
" Thyro-Epiglotidean ! " 

Call upon Dr. Metcalf for "cold water 
treatment! " Sixty (more or less) shiver- 
ing girls can testify to its efficacy. 

A strike in the Logic class ! Wholly 
due to a paucity of brain or — not enough 
fish ! 

A few rheumatic flies still cling to life ! 

Thanksgiving just ahead ! Keep up 
courage ! 

Our recent Concert so excited the minds 
of the Juniors, that they found it impossi- 
ble to sleep that night without holding a 
class-meeting. In consequence, residents 
on Happy Hall were entertained, for the 
space of half-an-hour or so, by various 
exclamations of joy and woe issuing from 
No. 4. 

When a bell taps for attention at the 
close of dinner on Monday evenings, we 
all know about what is coming, and pre- 
pare to enjoy (?) ourselves. Ralph Waldo 
Emerson is quoted as authority on " the 
subject in hand," however, so " Criti- 
cisms " have come to be duly appreciated ! 

" S. D." pins for the new members of 
the said literary circle have at last arrived, 
and about twenty "young women" are 
added to the number of those who bear 
these mystic symbols ! 

The students' prayer-meetings, which are 
held on Sabbath evenings, are increasing 
in interest, and a large" majority of the 
girls attend. 

A heated discussion on the propriety of 
wearing car-rings was decided by the pres- 
ident of our society, the other evening, in 
the negative. All gentlemen friends please 
take notice, and act accordingly! 



From half-past eight to nine, every even- 
ing, "we girls" occupy the gymnasium, 
and " make night hideous" with efforts to 
exercise our lungs. The usual cry at these 
times seems to be, " The March ! " 

The Seniors have met in solemn council 
upon several occasions, this term. Ques- 
tions of the highest importance have been 
gravely discussed, and officers elected for 
the ensuing year. 

Members of the astronomy class were 
greatly disappointed that the recent con- 
junction of Jupiter was rendered invisible 
by dark clouds and rain. But they felt 
somewhat repaid by a fine view of Saturn 
in conjunction on the evening of Nov. 5. 
The planet presented a beautiful appear- 
ance, with its rings looking like a rod, and 
several of its satellites in full view. 

Girls, beware of stragglers ! A few 
mornings ago, at an hour before light had 
dawned upon the world, one of the "young 
women " of this establishment was awak- 
ened by a strange noise in her room. 
Upon opening her eyes, she saw what 
appeared to be a person " clawing " upon 
the wall with his hands. She was so 
scared she immediately enveloped herself 
in the bed-clothes ; but her brave chum 
came to the rescue, and the following scene 
was enacted: Chum — " What do you 
want?" Answer : "My overcoat !" Chum : 
" Why, little boy, you are in the wrong 
room. Up one flight more." He at once 
vanished, and Morpheus again reigned 
among the inmates of the room. 

Do visions of turkey dinners, mince pie 
and plum pudding fill your dreams of late, 
girls? Let the thought of "Saturday 
night, the 30th," cool your enthusiasm on 
the subject. You who are so fortunate as 
to be nearer these " classic shades," think 
for a moment of Monday, Dec. 2nd at 4 
o'clock A.M 

Secret Societies multiply ! The " Quar- 
tette," which meets nightly in recitation- 
room No. 4, is certainly an august assem- 
blage, in a jihi/sical point of view. Cupid 
has surely entrapped in his snare, thus 
early in their lives, these innocent maid- 
ens ; for they wear his " Dart," as a badge, 
with the utmost assurance. A Sem "Trio" 
has also been organized. Where are the 
two brave girls who will form a rival 
"Duo?" Here is a chance for immortal 
fame ! 



News of old girls and teachers is earnestly 
solicited. 

Miss Belle Phelps is still at home, sick ; 
but we hope she will be able to return 
after Thanksgiving. 

We are glad to welcome in our midst 
Miss Steele, of Omaha. May she find 
Eastern people all they are reported to be ! 

Miss Ida Hull will continue her studies 
in the city, under a governess. 

We are afraid Miss R. did not appreci- 
ate the applause given her on the evening 
of the grand concert. 

Not long ago, Lila Dickson, Lizzie Whip- 
ple and Ida Smith made us a call. We are 
always glad to welcome the old girls, and 
may it not be long before they again 
gladden our eyes by their presence ! 

Miss Ella Stocking, who was with us 
two years, and who graduated from the 
High School in Hyde Park, is now making 
a tour through the cities of Philadelphia 
and Washington. 

Nothing gladdens our hearts more than 
to see the old graduates among us; audit 
was with great pleasure that we welcomed 
Miss Mary Starks, of '76, and only wish 
that her stay among us had been longer. 

The other day, Lasell's halls again re- 
sounded with the voices of five of its old 
girls. We were glad to see among us 
Annie White of "78, and Grace Perkins of 
'77. The other three were Lizzie Emer- 
son, who wears well the dignity of her 
new position, Emma Cutter and Nellie 
Ferguson. We wish others of our old 
school-mates would follow suit, and early 
pay us a visit. 

Those of us who received an invitation 
to the Literary Exercises of the Lyceum, at 
Wesleyan College, Cincinnati, were glad 
to recognize in its President, Miss Anna 
J. Howe, formerly a prominent member of 
the class of '79. We congratulate Anna 
upon the successful career which seems to 
be opening for her, and congratulate our- 
selves that Lasell assisted in her early 
training. 

We would like to inform our friends of 
the Milford Journal, that, although we have 
their "authority as to the fact that mos- 
quitos are beginning to fly South, yet 
really they have gone no further than 
Auburndale, where we have them in 
abundance ; and by sad experience we can 
prove that they are nightly "collecting 
their bills." 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



■ BY THE — 



Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBUKNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
CARRIE KEND1G, '79- 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
CORA B. FLINT, '79. ANNIE M. HOLBROOK, '80. 

PUBLISHER, 
LILLIE R. POTTER, 'So. 



ASSISTANT FUBLISHER?, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '80. MINNIE HOPKINS, '8o. 

TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

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Single Numbers, ----- 10 cts. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 



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m 

In one of Miss Frances Willard's inim- 
itable " Talks to Girls," she says : " First 
of all, I would say, keep to your speciality 
— to the doing- of the thing you accom- 
plish with most of satisfaction to yourself, 
and most of benefit to those around you. 

Keep to this, whether it is raising turnips 
or tunes ; painting screens or battle-pieces : 
studying political economy or domestic re- 
ceipts. For," she remarks in closing, "in 
creating each of us with some peculiar 
talent, God has given us each a call to 
some peculiar work." 

These are noble sentiments, expressed in 
words worthy of the woman who is de- 
voting time and talent, yea, and even her 
life, also, to the good of others ! But, 
although we feel inspired with an ardent 
desire to accomplish something in the 
world, — to leave a name whose lustre the 
lapse of ages cannot dim, — still we are dis- 
couraged by reading the very article 
-which, we feel assured, was written for a 
directly opposite effect. 

That any human being is so unfortunate 



as to have no talent in any direction, we 
hardly dare assert, especially after quoting 
the authority given above ; but that very 
many of us are so unfortunate as to be still 
ignorant in regard to the thing we could 
by any possibility consider a talent, we 
feel assured. 

We look about us, and see, in our small 
family of sixty or seventy girls, those 
whose genius is even now visible to the 
dullest perception. AVe admire and re- 
spect them. 

In imagination we can sec them, years 
hence, holding immense audiences spell- 
bound by their eloquent diction, or en- 
chanted by their exquisite musical rehears- 
als. Or, it may be, that some of these 
girls are destined to excel in the depart- 
ment of art ; and, after years of patient 
labor, the masterpiece will be held up to 
the world's millions for criticism. 

Lovers of Art will travel over land and 
sea to behold the world-renowned wonder, 
and gladly join the throng of worship- 
ers at the shrine of the artisan. We wish 
you God-speed in your work, girls ; and 
may glorious success crown your efforts ! 

But, meanwhile, what are we to do who 
have no such grand future in view ? 
Could we but penetrate the depths of 
Fairy-land, and draw thence Aladdin's 
magic lamp, wherewith to learn our des- 
tiny, " all might still be well ! " 

But hope in that direction vanished long 
ago, with Spenser and his " Queen," and 
we must rely upon the penetration of kind 
friends or upon our own good fortune for 
aid. 

We have about reached the conclusion 
that our specialty is something akin to 
that of the precocious child, whose father, 
upon being urged by a phrenologist to 
" Find out your child's specialty," re- 
marked : " We have tried this, and find it 
not so easy. Sometimes rock-candy seems 
to be the favorite, and then again there is 
a marked tendency to taffy." 

Surely, there must be some place in this 
great busy world for each of us to fill ; 
and, that we may be fitted for the position 
when it comes, let us perform well, present 
duties, and fully appreciate present priv- 
ileges. 

A word to you, girls, in closing! This 
is your paper, not the editor's paper ; and it 
is for your interest to do all in your power 
for its aggrandizement. Join the " Pub- 
lishing Association," and thus aid it with 
your influence ; or, at least, add some item 
of interest or more weighty article to each 
issue of the " Leaves." 



Afteraoans. 

Two hours of this afternoon are spent by 
the literature classes, under the guidance 
of Professor Hudson, in the study of the 
two greatest Williams of English Litera- 
ture : William Shakespeare and William 
Wordsworth. 

Although they stand side by side, yet 
they wrote on entirely different subjects : 
Shakespeare of men, and Wordsworth of 
inanimate nature. They seem fit compan- 
ions, as they each read aright the part 
they were to take. 

The first hour is spent with Shakespeare, 
" the greatest, wisest and sweetest of 
men," as Professor H. says. We find him 
capable of personating the human character 
in all its forms ; he read aright every emo- 
tion, and put into the mouths of his char- 
acters thoughts that will live forever. His 
delineation of character is perfect, and 
there is no kind of person that we do not 
find somewhere in his works. He seems 
to abound in wit of the richest kind, and 
there is hardly a play in which we do not 
find it. He is the greatest poet that ever 
lived, and will be loved as long as his books 
are read. His works are a never-failing 
source of study ; and, after spending years 
upon them, it seems as if we had just 
begun. 

" What needs my Shakespeare for his honored 

bones? 
The labor of an age in piled stones, 
Or that his hallowed reliques should be laid 
Under a starry-pointed pyramid? 
Dear son of Memory, great heir of Fame, 
What need'st thou such weak witness of thy 

name? 
Thou, in our wonder and astonishment, 
Hast built thyself a living monument; 
For whilst, to the shame of slow-endeavoring 

art, 
Thy easy numbers flow; and that each heart 
I lath, from the leaves of thy unvalued book 
Those Delphic lines with deep impression took; 
Then thou, our fancy of itself bereaving, 
Dost make us marble with too much conceiving; 
And, so sepulchred, in such pomp dest lie, 
That kings for such a tomb would wish to die." 

The above lines seem to express all we 
would say ; and as we all love him, there 
will be no need of saying more. 

After a little recess, we take up our 
Wordsworth ; and this hour is like spend- 
ing a day in the woods and fields. We see 
the little flowers that bloom by the way- 
side, and 

" Behold, within the leafy shade, 
Those bright blue eggs together laid ; 
On me the chance-discovered sight 
Gleamed like a vision of delight." 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Oh, it is even better ; for, unless we go 
with very observing eyes, we do not see 
many of the beautiful things that he has 
described in his charming manner. 

His whole being seems bound up in na- 
ture ; he first contemplates the object, then 
puts it aside, and reproduces it in the beau- 
tiful thoughts which it suggested to his 
mind. Not only is he a great lover of 
nature, but he has entered the deeper 
r ecesses of the human soul, and has great 
reverence for both God and man. He 
makes the hills have life, and the flowers 
breath, endearing them to the heart. 
There is nothing so lowly but that he can 
find beauty in it, or so grand but he can 
bring it within the reach of all. He brings 
to the notice of the world many obscure 
and lowly things, making them monuments 
to keep his memory green in the minds of 
his readers forever. 

Our Wordsworth is a book to keep by 
the side of our Bible, as it draws our at- 
tention to, and teaches us of, nature in its 
highest sense ; and in studying this, our 
minds are naturally drawn to their Creator. 



Bursts of applause and exclamations 
were not wanting when, some Saturdays 
ago, Professor Dole kindly offered to take 
us for a row. Here was a chance to show 
our oarsmanship ! We left the Seminary 
about two o'clock, and, after a short walk, 
arrived at the wharf. The boats soon 
came, and we started down the river. 
Those which were in the rear had the 
pleasure of remaining there during the 
entire time. But the girls in said boats 
affirmed that they did not care to row all 
the time ; they wanted to practice "resting 
on their oars!" Our joy was increased 
when we found that our destination was 
Mayor Fowle's watch factory. 

Arriving there, we passed through the 
many rooms, and saw watches in different 
stages of construction. We were as much 
delighted as little Budge, in watching ''the 
wheels go round." Then we returned to 
our boats : the party divided, as some 
seemed desirous of a longer row down the 
river, while others were ready to go home. 
Landing at the wharf, we were soon seen 
wending our way up the Seminary Hill. 
The rest followed in due time, and we all 
agreed that we had a very enjoyable time. 



Let us direct the attention of our read- 
ers to the fact that the best place to got 
their music is Arthur P. Schmidt. 



We were very pleasantly entertained, 
Wednesday evening, Nov. 13, by the 
Messrs. Behr, assisted by Miss Mehlback. 
At an early hour the Chapel was crowded, 
and at half-past seven the gentlemen 
played the opening piece : a trio on violin, 
violincello and flute. Mr. Charles Behr 
performed finely on the zither ; and, as en- 
cores, played several familiar airs, such as 
"Old Folks at Home," "The Sweet Bye- 
and-bye," etc. The duets and trios were 
admirably rendered ; and the closing piece, 
a quartette on violin, cello, flute and piano, 
was heartily applauded. At the close of 
the entertainment the audience gave a vote 
of thanks to the Messrs. Behr. We hope 
that when the gentlemen come this way 
again, they will certainly not forget to 
make us a call. 



On the afternoon of Nov. 21, Miss Bur- 
beck, the teacher in dressmaking by the 
Taylor system, gave a lecture before the 
students, illustrating her method of work. 
She chose one from those assembled, tak- 
ing the measure, cutting the lining, and 
fitting the waist ; and we were glad to see 
that there was no need of the slightest 
alteration. It seems that now we shall be 
released from that most tedious operation 
of trying on -dresses; and it will be wel- 
comed by mothers who have large families, 
and have to be dependent upon a dress- 
maker to cut their dresses. 



lecture. 

On Wednesday evening, the 20th of 
November, the first lecture of the Student's 
course was delivered in the Seminary Chap- 
el, by Dr. A. P. Pcabody, of Cambridge. 
He took for his subject, " The Needs, Duty 
and Methods of Self-culture." To those 
who have ever had the pleasure of hearing 
the lecturer, no word of commendation is 
needed ; but for the benefit of others, let 
us say that his words of advice and warn- 
ing, his apt figures, and his original say- 
ings, are "worth their weight in gold" to 
every boy and girl about to graduate from 
active school-life. 

Readers may expect extracts from the 
lecture in our next issue. 



The " Alumni " of our last issue was 
the printer's mistake ; a Boston printer at 
that, where even the street-sweeps and 
boot-blacks are supposed to be familiar with 



the dead languages ! 



On the first Tuesday in this month, we 
Lasell girls, together with other (?) politi- 
cians of the Commonwealth, voted for 
Governor. The ballot, when counted, gave 
the following results: Miner — 1; Abbott 
— 1; Butler — 6; Talbot— 58. Immense 
applause! We vowed to "toss" the But- 
ler girls that night, but they wisely kept 
pretty "dark," and accordingly we were not 
"sure enough of our men" to attempt 
anything of the kind. Besides, we judged 
that some of the General's adherents voted 
from a financial point of view, and not 
according to political favoritism, from the 
fact that two of the said partisans affirmed 
that they voted for " Ben" because they 
were " wearing their purses out carrying 
silver money ! " 

We are glad that we can number one 
decidedly temperate girl among us, even 
though it does "divide the party." As 
for the "Abbott voters" — that is right; 
stick to your principles under all cir- 
cumstances ! The Republicans bear off the 
palm in this school, as they do in every 
well-regulated institution ; and consequent- 
ly Talbot is elected by an overwhelming 
majority. 

By-the-way, if Butler had only given us 
girls, for the Seminary, a little bit of the 
money they say he has wasted in getting 
votes, what good it might have done ! 
There is the new telescope to be paid for ; 
the Library wants some new books ; the 
Seminary building needs an addition to 
accommodate applicants for admission, 
etc., etc. 

General, can't you send us a check, — a 
modest check, — to help clear your con- 
science for spending so much money for 
nothing? 



Extract from a Senior Essay, Subject, 



u 



Mi 



"Cow! Thou art an ancient being; 
more ancient, indeed, than the Pyramids, or 
the original thoughts of a Junior. In 
beauty of form, and grace of motion, thou 
art not equalled by the goat ; while thy 
piercing light eyes see better, even at 
noon-da} 7 , than the owl or mosquito at 
night. 

" Cow ! " — Here our friend is interrupted 
in her eloquence by the noble head of a 
Junior which appears through the half-open 
door. The Junior, demands if she knows 
that it is only 17,465,400 seconds to Com- 
mencement Day I 



6 



LASELL LEAVES. 



" Much learning shows how little mor- 
tals know." 

" A poetess is said to be among the new 
inmates. Deliver us!" Ditto. Ed. 

" Heaven gave women tongues to ask 
questions with, and eyes to give answers 
with." Canadian Spectator. 

Taken from the " Harvard Advocate " 
of May, 1870, and inserted for the especial 
benefit of the Vocalists ! 

" The pharynx now goes up ; 
The larynx, with a slam, 
Ejects a note 
From out the throat, 
Pushed by the diaphragm." 

" Meaning, goes but a little way in most 
things ; for you may mean to stick things 
together, and your glue may be bad — and 
then where are you ? " Geo. Eliot. 

This is a boy's composition on girls : 
"Girls are the only folks that has their 
own way every time. Girls is of several 
thousand kinds, and sometimes one girl 
can be like several thousand girls if she 
wants to do anything. This is all I know 
about girls ; and father says the less I know 
about them the better off I am." 

Wonder if this is the sentiment of that 
boy's older brothers? Ed. 

Fob the Seminary logicians ! — " Let me 
give you my definition of metaphysics. 
It is, when two folks get together, each 
admits what neither can prove, and both 
say ' Hence we infer.' " Ingersoll. 

" A mother upon being told by the prin- 
cipal of the boarding-school which her 
daughter attended, that all the young lady 
lacked was capacity, innocently remarked 
that "she would send for one immedi- 
ately ! " D. 

It would be cheaper to buy at whole- 
sale ! Ed. 

Girls, if you want to prove to your 
friends the beautifying effect of Boston air, 
have your pictures taken at Clark's. 

Nothing need be said to the members of 
the " S. D." society in favor of N. G. Wood 
& Son, as they have proved for themselves 
their work and worth. But let us remind' 
the public that " They can't be beat ! " 

Girls, when getting fancy goods or 
worsted, don't think of going anywhere 
but to J. W. Davis, Auburn dale. We 
believe in patronizing home-trade — par- 
ticularly when they advertise with us ! 



When buying furniture for those " cas- 
tles in the air," go to J. S. Paine, and you 
will go no farther, as they have a better 
assortment than any other place in the 
"Hub," and are also very polite and at- 
tentive to all strangers. 

We wish to remind "our girls," that 
when they get married, — whenever that 
time shall be, — to buy their sets of china, 
glass, etc., of Abram French & Co. For 
fear he might get tired of waiting, let us 
buy our holiday gifts there this Christmas ! 

All who want a piece of wedding-cake 
to dream on, go to Wm. West & Co. See 
second page of advertisements. 

We call the attention of our readers to 
the advertisement of John H. Pray, Sons 
& Co., which appears on our first page. 
Those of our friends who have called upon 
them are delighted. Santa Claus would do 
well to make a note of this fact. 

Several of the bashful girls would like 
to suggest to their parents, through the 
columns of the Leaves, that the Weber 
Piano would be a lovely Christmas gift. 
(Ahem !) So say we all of us ! 

Learned & Co.'s Dining Saloon is a favorite 
place of rendezvous for the Seminary girls. 
Readers of the Leaves would do well to 
give them a call, at 413 Washington St. 

How can we better keep up the acquaint- 
ance with our old school friends, than by 
visiting ? And we are glad to write that 
Miss Ida Philips' class of '77, is now 
visiting Gertie Orelup, of Troy, New York, 
a former pupil at Lasell. 

The girls who have so lavishly provided 
themselves with barrels of apples may 
find a sense of satisfaction in being as- 
sured that, on authority, " apples are very 
poor this year, and will in no wise last 
until you can consume them." So fai'ewell 
to fruit and — your greenbacks ! 

We have heard of October mosquitoes, 
and have seen a poem dedicated to said 
insects. But what is their fame compared 
to that of midnight vocalists of the last 
week in November. Anxious days and 
.sleepless nights are our portion at present. 

Mrs. O. S. SMITH, 

FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKER 

Rooms over the Post-Office, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 

LITOLFF'3 CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 40 Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



In stock, a great variety of handsomely-bound books for 
the Holidays. 

JH5T WHAT HAS BEEN M1ED ! 
A LADIES LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No. 30 Avon Street, Boston, 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Parties served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



100 DOLLARS SAVED 



Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 



LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea, 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 

Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, .... $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar, 40 cents 

Pure Cassia, 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger, . . . . .12 cents lb. 
Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1.00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses, . . . . .GO cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



G. D. GOBB & BROTHERS, 

726 and 728 Washington Street. 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



WEBER PIANO. 



The first choice of every Great Vocalist, Pianist 
and Musician in the World. 



READ WHAT THEY SAY. 

"For the last six years your pianos have been my 
choice for the concert-room and my own house." — 
Kellogg. 

" I feel that every one is fortunate who owns a Weber 
Piano, because of its rich and sympathetic quality of 
tone."— Caky. 

"I shall take every opportunity to recommend and 
praise your instruments."— Nilsson. 

" I have used the pianos of every celebrated maker, but 
give yours the preference over all." — Patti. 

"Your Uprights are extraordinary instruments, and 
deserve their great success."— Lucca. 

"Your instruments surpass my expectations, and I rank 
you justly as the foremost manufacturer of the day." 
— MUKSKA. 

" Your instruments have no superior anywhere. I 
certainly have not seen any pianos in America which 
even approach them." — Goddard. 

"I am not surprised that every great artist prefers the 
Weber Pianos; they are truly noble instruments, and 
meet every requirement of the most exacting artist." — 
Careno. 

"Your pianos astonish me; I assure you that I have 
never yet seen any pianos which equal yours."— Strauss. 

"Mme. Parepa called your pianos the finest in the 
United States. I fully endorse that opinion. They have 
no rival anywhere." — Wehli. 

"Amongst the many excellent pianos made in the city, 
the Weber ranks the foremost."— Mills. 



WAREROOMS: 

FIFTH AVENUE, cor. SIXTEENTH ST., NEW YORK, 

3 BEDFORD STREET, BOSTON. 

W. G-. BAKER & CO. 
Window Shades, Upholstery Goods, Curtain Materials, 

LACE CURTAINS, 

DRAPERIES, ETC. 
23 iiroinfield Street, Boston. 

flint III 

AUBURN DALE, MASS. 
Office Hours: 9-12 A.M.; 1.30-5 p.m. 

SWAN <5c NEWTON, 

!)'•: \LKItS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. ISOSTO.V. 

S. B. NEWTON. 

J". "W- ID .A."V I S 3 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
cry, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 



MMAt, AND GRAIN WHOLESALE & RETAIL. 



BRANCH CROCERY STORE, 

BOYTON BLOCK, NEWTON LOWER FALL?, MASS. 



Agency for Mme. Demcrest's Reliable Patterns. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

#§" All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 
DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 
J" -A. :VE IE S VIGKEHS, 
Auburn St., Auburudale. 

N. G. WOOD & SON, 

tytwlm ami JfKtomttritlis, 



444 Washington Street, 



Boston, 



Next door to Jordan, Marsh & Co's, desire to call special 
attention to their large and beautiful stock of fine goods, 
consisting in part of 

Diamond Ear-Drops, two stone, from $50 to $1000 per pair. 

Diamond Rings, set in 18 kt, gold, from $25 to $200, 

Gent's Diamond Pins, from $25 to $200. Ladies 

Lace Pins and Lockets, set with. Diamonds, 

All of the best quality, which are selling at a very small 
advance from the cost. 

Also, an entire line of fine Gold Jewelry, Ladies' and 
Gents' AValtham Watches, fine Gold Chains, Gorham 
Silver Ware of every description, Silver Plated Ware 
from the best manufacturers in the country; French 
Clocks, Bronzes, and every other kind of goods usually 
found in a first-class Jewe'ry store. 

All our goods marked in plain figures. 

W JVI. WEST <3t CO. 

7 HANOVER ST,, BOSTON, three doors from Court St. 
Manufacturers of 

Pure Confectionery & SuperiorWedcling Cakes 

All kinds of Cake, of the finest quality, at wholesale 
and retail. 



J. H. ROBINSON & CO. 

Formerly Gregory & Robinson, 

Importers, To"b"bers and. Retailers 
— OF — 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Paper Hangings, 

406 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 



JOHN 1L ROBINSON. 

CHAS. H. WHITMARSH. 
CHAS. W. ROBINSON. 



9H 



* 



Very large stock of School ami Miscellaneous 

Books, in ancient ami modern languages. 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

(Successor to Schoenhof & Moeller), 
40 Winter St., Boston. 

CROSBY & FOSS, 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS, 

Have Removed to 

421 W1SMI1©T@M ST1I1T, 

Fifth store north of Winter Street. 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




PORTRAITS 



In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon, and Ink. 

C. M. LITCHFIELD. w. LORING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Actliti IktnMi 

Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




ORIENTAL TEA CO. 

87 Court Street, Boston, 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburudale, free 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Abram French & Co. 



IMPORTERS OF 



C\ IIMIIIIININIIIIIIIINMIIINIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIiinimilllllllllllllNIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIIillMllllllllillll -WrWs 
IrockebT 

CHINA, 

GLASSWARE AND FANCY GOODS, 

SILVER-PLATED WARE, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



89, 91 & 93 FRANKLIN STREET, Corner Devonshire, 

ABRAM FHENCH. -\ f L. G. COBURN. 

JOHN T. WELLS, i BOSTON \ WM- Xm FRENCH - 
L.#;. CASWELL. J IS.WA 



S.WALDO FRENCH. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 

PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. riiiladeipliiii (fentennial), 1876. 



4|)las8 pitofagrajlurs* 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink 
Water Color and Oil. 



Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

stationers and |laak look Manufacturers. 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



8. S. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAY. 



N 



OTMAN 



% M 



^2Ph oio0raphcr^ 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, Park Street. 

STTJDIO z 

99 Boylstnn Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on lirst floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 



THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Alio, Sole Manufacturers cf "The Ironclad" Paits and Ovoralls. 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

NICHOLS dfc EJ-A.I_jXj 7 

Publishers, "Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers cf BLANK BOOZS, 
32 Bromfield Street. - - - BOSTON. 

G. HENRY HAKPIN, 

Dealer in 

REPAIEIN& PE0MPIL7 ATTENDED TO. 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNOALE, MAS?. 




C. SARGENT BIFID, 

Patent Medicines, fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 



HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST. 



AUBURNOALE, MASS. 



FRANK WOOD, 

— STEAM PRINTER — 

No. 352 Washington Street. Neakly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

^WHITJS, SMITH & CO. 

51G Washington Street, Boston. Music Publishers 

and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 

and Viaiio Studies, both Foreign and American, 

Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 

Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also 

Publishers of " The Folio," the grca+a 

Musical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

■W. D. LATHROP, 

AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK I BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, WOOD, HA Y, STRA W, LIME, 

Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 
WEST NEWTON -an.,- AUBURNDALE. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 
UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 

BOSTON. 

THOMA8 HA.lL.rv, 

Manufactuking Electrician- and Optician, dealer 
in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instruments, 
Wire, Batteries, Materials, etc. Hall's Patent Electric 
Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-house , hotels, factories, 
steamboats, banks, and railroad depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

JYo. 19 Itroiiilielcl Street, Boston, mass. 
Establish^.! in is:ir.. Si-t- Hsill's illustrated Telegrajili Cnta]ngne 



Frames, 

Engraving?, 
Albums, 

Passe-partouts 
Etc., Etc. 

C. A. PERKINS & CO. 

Successors to 
COLLIER & PERKINS, 

No- 361 Washington Street. 

^HjIF'IrFJ.IEID 1^ RUSH, 

iPOIiECIRY, 

Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Sreets,. 
AUBURNDALE. 

LADIES A1VD <;Er¥Tl.E*IHV 

Visiting Boston, cither on business or pleasure, should 
not fail to call at 

Learned & Oo.'s new and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

4-1 S Washington Street. 

EMILY METCALF, M. D. 
Corner Main & Moody Streets, WALTHAM 

Office hours, 1 to 5 p. m , and evenings usually. 

DEALER IN 

PEOVISIONS, 

COE. AUBURN & LEXINGTON STS. 

FURNITURE 

IMPOKTED EXPRESSLY FOR 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S GIFTS.. 

USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL. 

Now on Exhibition at Paine's Warerooms, 141 Friend St. 

PRICE-LIST, Wholesale and Retail. 
Bouquet Stands, new designs, $2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10," 15, 25, £0, to 

$50. 
Bible Stands, useful and ornamental, $4, 5, 8, 1C, 15, 18, 

20, 3f, to $75. 
Pedestals, French, $7, 10, 15. 2P, 25, 30, 35, 40 and $50. 
Jardinieres, of most beautiful designs, entirely new 

styles, $5, 10, 15, 25, to $35. 
Work Tables, very pretty, new patterns, $2, 5, S, 10, 12, 

15, 20, 25. $40. 
Writing Desks, convenient and elegant, $12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 

3f, 50, (50, to $150. 
Camp Chairs, in every style, $2, 3, 3.50, 4, 6, 7.70, 8, 10, to 

$.i0 

Folding Chairs, a very useful present, : 

18, 25, 30, to $45. 
Music Portfolios. Racks and Screens, 

25, 30. 35 to $75. 
Clocks, French and American, $2, 2.f0, 3, 5,.7, 8, 9,10, 12,. 

15 and $25. 
Bronze Ornaments, French, $2.50, 4, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35. to $65. 
Alabaster, for Mantel Ornaments, from Italy, 50c, $1, 2, 

3, 5, 7, 10, 12, lfi, to $35. 
Mar(|iieterie Tables, from Paris, $30, 45, 75, 125, 150 and 

$200. 
Parlor Tables, very rich, $15, 18, 20, 25, 35, 45, to $10". 
Brackets new sty es, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, 2, 2.50, 2.75, 3, 4, 5,. 

6, 7, 8, 9 and $10. 
Fancy Reception and Turkish Chairs, $8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 

17. 19, 25, 35, 50, to $85. 
Foot Rests, $5, 6, 7, S. 10, 12, $15. 
Blacking Cases, Black Walnut, witrfDrawers and Slide,. 

$5, 5 50 and $0. 
Etageres, most elegant, $28, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, to $125. 
Parlor Cabinets, from Paris, $55, 75, 125, 150, 175, 250 and 

$300. 
Hanging Flower-pot Holders, $'.50 to $15. 
Piano stools, $0, « 7, S, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, to $50. 
Card Receivers, $3, 4. 6, 8, to $25. Aquariums, $15. 
Shaving -Stands for dressing-rooms, $15, 20, 25, 35, to $5fl- 
Girls' and Boy's Chamber Suites, $22, 25, 2S, 30, 35, to $75. 

Work* of art, in figures and has reliefs, from Copen- 
hagen, making a most wonderful dis lay, which we are 
now selling at the very lowest importing prices. 



3, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 
6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20,. 



141 Friend Street, ^ 48 Canal Street.. 

—J. S. PAINE. 





ZDTT.3SL ZE-'EJVLIINr^ PAOTI." 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUKNDALE, MASS., DECEMBEK, 1878. 



Number 3. 



CARPETS 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS * CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers . 

In New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a spocialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, ns we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, wo can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BOSTON. 



TIb Ifttis,, Itoty ani litlsii ef 
Sdf-Cttltire. 



EXTRACTS FROM A LECTURE DELIVERED BY DR. 
A. P. PEABODY, AT LASELL SEMINARY. 

There are those who, so far as is possi- 
ble while in school, and entirely on leaving 
school, give themselves up to pleasure. 
They make a work of play. Their business 
is to invent ways of killing time, new 
amusements, fresh gayeties. These persons, 
while they are very young, are very fasci- 
nating. But they do not last long. They 
fade out. They do not exactly grow old, 
— there is not substance enough in them 
for that ; they never really seem like grown 
women ; but they pretty easily lapse into a 
sort of superannuated girlhood. They are 
thrown aside. Their places as leaders in 
fashionable dissipation are taken by the 
least profitable members of a newer gener- 
ation ; while they cling to the skirts of the 
society of which they were once thought 
the ornaments, till they are shaken off into 
neglect, loneliness, or the grave. Except 
absolutely vicious people, I know hardly 
any who are so much to be pitied. 

I was familiarly acquainted with the 
young ladies' school (the Mount Vernon) 
kept by that Nestor among teachers, the 
well-known Jacob Abbott ; and, it seemed 
to me, of pre-eminent excellence, simply be- 
cause thinking was the chief work done 
there. The range of text-books was so 
small, and the lessons were so few and 
short, that the school stood very low in the 
estimation of those who measured its work 
by the square foot of printed page ; but 
whatever was studied was thoroughly di- 
gested, assimilated, made a portion of the 
living substance of the minds of the pupils. 

5}t JjC 3f! t* 'iS 

There is such a thing as overloading the 
mind. I have seen little coasting sloops 
and schooners so full of luggage — with 
freight not only stowed away in the hold, 
but thrown about the cabin-floor and litter- 
ing the gang-ways — that it seemed utterly 
impossible to work the vessel. In like 
manner, there are minds that have taken in 
more freight than they can stow properly. 



They do not, indeed, know too much ; but 
what they know has not been arranged or 
methodized. It lies around loose, and is in 
their way when they try to think, if ever 
they do try. Such are the Mrs. Nicklebys — 
of whom you have, no doubt, known many 
— who never put two things together that 
belong together; never give a reason for 
anything ; and, at the same time, can never 
be convinced that they are in the wrong, 
though you give them full and plain proof 
that they are so. 

* ^ * * * 

The old idea of education was, the pack- 
ing the mind with names, dates and facts, 
as a trunk is packed with clothes. Words 
used to be committed to memory, without 
any idea of what they meant ; and there 
were what were called good schools, in 
which the scholar who substituted his own 
words for those in the book, lost rank. 
This literal memorizing was always very 
foolish ; but there was formerly more apol- 
ogy for it than there is now. When I was 
of your age, we used to carry a great deal 
in our heads, because there was nowhere 
else to keep it. But now there are refer- 
ence books of all kinds within the reach ot 
every well-educated person, and if you 
know where to find any item of informa- 
tion that you need, it may be better for 
you to leave it on your shelves, than to 
carry it in your memory. 

* * * * * 

I would have you make mental vigor 
a foremost aim in your self-culture. While, 
not in mere professional phrase, but in 
my inmost soul, I regard piety toward 
God, with its attendant graces, as worth 
immeasurably more than the highest intel- 
lectual culture ; yet it cannot be denied 
that there are many excellent women who 
have very weak and shallow minds, and 
whose goodness does not do half the good 
it might if their minds were stronger. 
***** 

Read not only for amusement, but for in- 
struction ; and for instruction, choose not 
easy reading, but such books as will tax 
your powers to understand them. Do not 
acquiesce in what you read. Do not have 
the easy confidence which some show in 
the infallibility of print. There is but one 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Book in the world that is above you, and 
demands your implicit faith. All the rest 
crave your judgment upon their contents, 
and will be of service to you only as they 
stir your minds to action. 

***** 

The question is ripe now, whether young 
men and young women shall have the same 
education. I would say, Yes, if they have the 
same mental endowments and proclivities, 
are destined for the same places in the 
household, the church and the State. But 
if there be a different tone and staple of in- 
tellect, and if they must fill unlike posi- 
tions, and perform unlike offices, in the 
economy of life, then should there be cor- 
responding differences in their school-cul- 
ture and their self-culture. The women 
who appear on the platform as the cham- 
pions of their sisterhood, are louldy claim- 
ing equality. Would not equivalence be a 
truer and better word? I cannot for one 
moment admit that woman is in any sense 
or degree inferior to man; but I do not be- 
lieve that she can learn or do the same 
things as well — nor yet can he learn or do 
certain other things as well as she. His is 
the wider, hers the richer field. His is 
the stronger power of reasoning ; hers, the 
quicker intuition and clearer insight. His 
is the more easy mastery of abstract sci- 
ence ; hers, the finer aesthetic nature, the 
keener sense of the beautiful in art and in 
literature, the larger capacity of culture 
in all that contributes to the grace, orna- 
ment and charm of society. 

Our college curriculum is precisely what 
may best fit men for the pulpit, the bar, 
the construction of public works, the man- 
agement of mercantile and financial inter- 
ests, but it is deficient in grace and amen- 
ity ; and with women so educated, home-life 
would be barren of its most attractive in- 
fluences, and the parlor would be but the 
chilling and repulsive duplicate of the of- 
fice or the counting-room. 

There are cares and duties which men 
will not, cannot undertake. There are 
queenly social positions which no conceiv- 
able training could fit men to fill. Shall 
they be left vacant ? There are many pro- 
fessions and places in society which women 
have not the bodily strength to occupy ; 
many which would bring them into rough 
collisions, in which they must sacrifice all 
their instinctive modesty and delicacy ; 
many in which, from their very nature, 
they would compete unsuccessfully with 
men ; many for which, if otherwise fitted, 
they must, as a pre-requisite to success, 
abandon forever those domestic relations in 



which they will be immeasurably happier 
and more useful. Let, then, the order of 
Providence be held sacred ; and it is an 
order which gives woman by far the larger 
influence and power for good. Home, 
which is her throne, is the prime force of 
the civilized world. Men are, for the most 
part, what their native homes and the 
homes that they have established make 
and keep them ; and home is what woman 
makes it. 

I earnestly advise you to cultivate a 
growing familiarity with the languages 
other than your own, of which you have ac- 
quired the rudiments. There is no so essen- 
tial aid in clear thinking, fluent speaking 
and ready, accurate and elegant writing. 
You understand your own language only 
through other tongues. As, by comparing 
the bones of two or more animals, one 
learns more of the anatomy of either of 
them than if he had bestowed thrice the 
time on that alone, so does he who can 
compare two or more languages under- 
stand his own tongue, as no student of but 
one language can possibly understand it. 
I feel the truth of this so strongly, that, had 
I the control of a school, no member of it 
should ever look into an English grammar 
till after studying French or Latin, or both. 
Indeed, what is called English grammar, is, 
most of it, fictitious — kept up for the bene- 
fit of book-makers and publishers. It con- 
sists of the forced application, to the Eng- 
lish, of principles and rules borrowed from 
other languages ; and the shams are de- 
tected, and the truth perceived, by those 
who have studied other tongues. 

5JC 5J^ *fr ^]> *<r> 

As for the Latin, it may present difficul- 
ties at the outset ; but if you will only sur- 
mount them, you will learn to love it — will 
take a lively interest in its perfect and 
beautiful structure, and will acquire for 
your own diction and written style some- 
thing of its marvelous terseness, direct- 
ness and energy. At the same time, its 
multiform relations to your own tongue 
will constantly excite and reward your in- 
telligent curiosity, and will open to you, in 
almost every English sentence, depths of 
meaning which the merely English reader 

does not begin to sound. 

***** 

Not as a minister, but simply as an edu- 
cator, I would say, Study the Bible — not 
merely read it, but study it, and what- 
ever may illustrate its history and its con- 
tents. Apart from its religious uses, it pos- 
sesses an unequaled literary interest. The 






Old Testament is a repertory of curious 
history, of wonderfully quaint and piquant 
biography and anecdote, and, at the same 
time, of poetry of unparalelled beauty and 
grandeur. In the New Testament, beside 
the life of Him whose advent is the most 
momentous epoch in the history of our 
race, you have in St. Paul the greatest 
man that God ever made ; in his epistles, 
some of the most eloquent passages in the 
literature of the ages ; in the epistle of 
James, the most perfect ethical treatise ever 
written ; in the Apocalypse, a prose-poem 
whose gorgeous and glorious imagery has 
been an unexhausted fountain of inspira- 
tion for all these Christian Centuries. As 
well-educated women, you must make 
yourselves conversant with these records 
above all others ; and Heaven grant that 
they prove to you the means of the yet more 
essential nurture of heart and life in virtue 
and piety ! 



News of old girls and teachers is earnestly 
solicited. 

Miss Kate Ellis is spending the winter 
in Boston, where she will continue her 
study of French and painting. 

We were all glad to welcome Prof. Brag- 
don back, after his brief absence in New 
York. 

We are always glad to have the school 
full, and it was with pleasure that we wel- 
comed Miss McColl, of San Francisco, as a 
member of our family. 

Miss Belle Phelps has returned to us 
fully recovered in health, after her few 
weeks of rest at home. 

Miss Lizzie Bacon, after suffering for sev- 
eral days with a severe toothache, has gone- 
home. We wish her a speedy recovery, 
and hope she will be able to return after 
the Christmas vacation. 

Miss Anna Lovering, "79, has been 
obliged to discontinue all study for awhile, 
on account of serious trouble with her eyes. 
Her classmates extend their warmest sym- 
pathies, and assure her that the Seniors can 
never learn to live without her I 

Our fleshy young women do not like to 
resort to " Anti-fat," but they will try most 
anything else, even starving to death I 
Not long ago, Miss Mattie Ransom and 
Miss Rouette Bowen made a wager that 
they would go a week without eating. 
Their commencement was very encourag- 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



ing; but, of course, such conduct could not 
be allowed in the young women of Lasell 
Seminary, and, through the efforts of inter- 
ested friends, they were induced to partake 
of some light food — and since then have 
found it very beneficial to their delicate 
constitutions. 

The new blackboard is quite an im- 
provement to the Chapel, and we are sure 
that Professor Wheeler gladly welcomes, 
for his vocal class, that of which he has 
long felt the need. 



" The Academy " for November contains 
too many articles on " Thanksgiving Day." 
We advise you not to be so exclusive in 
your choice of subjects, at least until your 
sheet is somewhat enlarged ! 

The "Richmond College Messenger" 
comes to us in a very neat and compact 
form. We congratulate you on your paper, 
Messrs. Editors. 

" Comparisons are odious," but we feel 
called upon to make one for the benefit of 
our friends of the " Greylock Monthly." 
Bear witness to our statement, you who are 
versed in such matters, that the average 
college student is an entirely different spe- 
cies of the genus homo, from the average 
military cadet. It is impossible to slide 
through a U. S. military school and bear 
off the laurels of Commencement and Class- 
day, knowing a little of either books or 
life, as a deplorably large number of our 
college students do. 

We see on our table the first issue of the 
"Randolph Macon Monthly," and, judging 
from this copy, we doubt not that the 
wishes for its success expressed in the ed- 
itorial will be abundantly realized. We 
like the size and general style of the 
paper. 

The November " Aurora," containing a 
full and interesting account of Commence- 
ment week exercises, lies on our table. 

The " Argosy " is brought to our atten- 
tion, for the first time, this month. We 
shall consider it a valuable exchange. 



Snow, at last ! 

" Try it again, please." 

Colds are all the style at present — espe- 
cially among the vocalists ! 

The Junior's cry : "An apple ! an apple I 
My kingdom for an apple ! " 



Great excitement among the girls ! The 
end of the term draws nigh, and aspirants 
for the Self-Governed list still "hope 
against hope." 

The promptness of our girls in returning 
after Thanksgiving vacation, was some- 
thing admirable and wonderful. Every 
pupil was in her place for morning pray- 
ers, with but one or two exceptions, and 
those were cases of dire necessity. 

Odr skaters have finally found opportu- 
nity to try their skill on an Auburn dale 
" pond I " There are some very fine skat- 
ers among us; and, on the other hand, sev- 
eral who are quite as likely to skate on 
their heads, as their feet ! 

Time, 9.33 p. m. Unmistakable sounds of 

suppressed laughter issue from No. 

Miss T , knocking upon the door: 

" Young ladies, please put a period to that 
till to-morrow morning." Silence reign- 
eth! 

How are these definitions of "motion" for 
originality of thought and expression? — 
"The result of force ; " "Equilibrium re- 
sisted;" " Absence of rest ; " " Change of 
place." 

Christmas shopping — what a charm there 
is about it ! Quite a number of the girls 
have spent a Saturday in Boston indulging 
in this occupation, — and also in "cara- 
mels," just for the sake of variety, — and 
have come back laden with mysterious- 
looking packages. Let not the inhabitants 
of the " Hub " be alarmed — there are some 
few articles of merchandise left in the city ! 

A certain Junior has " given away the 
class," in a most heart-rending manner. In 
what age do we live, under what flag do 
we stand, that these things should be?" 
" Fairs " are an abomination! Beware of 
them, ye who would keep young and inno- 
cent maidens free from contact with the 
vile world and the "vulgar crowd" in 
general ! 

At some future time, when the finances 
of the " Association" are in a little better 
condition, we purpose to improve our paper 
by the insertion of illustrations. This will 
be done entirely for the benefit of our mas- 
culine readers I 

The usual amount of fancy work is in 
process of construction among the " Sems." 
Fathers and mothers, sisters, brothers and 

friends, you may expect to be kindly 

remembered on Christmas-day! For the 
benefit of the latter, we will say, that sev- 
eral handsome "Cigarette Cases" adorn 



certain rooms at present ; we judge they 
are not intended to remain there perma- 
nently. But, girls, we should not encour- 
age tobacco ! 

The girls who spent the Thanksgiving 
vacation at the Seminary, are loud in their 
praises of the good time they enjoyed. A 
hearty vote of thanks is due to Professor 
and Mrs. Bragdon, for the many pleasant 
surprises which they prepared. It will be 
long before the girls forget the home-like 
Thanksgiving dinner ; the candy-pull, un- 
der the direction of the Misses Ransom ; 
and the many other enjoyable occasions. 

We would like to ask that member of the 
Astronomy class who was racking her 
brain the other day to think of the tele- 
scopic appearance of the earth, from what 
position she would take her observations. 

Our society is very prosperous, and has 
a larger number of members than ever be- 
fore. 



Taste Pluta's provisions once, and you 
will want to do so often again. 

Girls, when you are in town, go to 
Cook's for your lunch, and you will eat, 
whether you are hungry or not. 

W. G. Baker & Co. will show you as 
fine an assortment of goods in his line as 
you can see anywhere. 

If you want your room to look like a 
conservatory, an]art-gallery or an Egyptian 
tomb, go to J. H. Robinson & Co., and he 
will do it for you. 

Let the Class of "19 get their pictures 
taken at Notman & Campbell's, and they 
will be astonished to find themselves such 
a handsome class — as will we all ! 

Now when we are having so many fine 
lectures, and taking so many notes, let us 
remember the best place to get our blank 
books, etc., is at Aaron B. Gay & Co. 

Go to Chadwick's for all the lead you 
want. 

If you want a fine rig to take the Semin- 
ary girl riding, get it at Lathrop's, and she 
will go — if she can. 

Persons desiring frames, engravings, al- 
bums, etc., please call upon C. J. Perkins 
& Co., No. 361 Washington St. Mr. Per- 
kins's art rooms are too well known to Bos- 
tonians to need further mention. 

The friends of Crosby <£• Foss, Jewelers 
and Silversmiths, will be pleased to find 
their advertisement in our columns. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 



— BY THE- 



Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOB, 
CARRIE KENDIG, '79- 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
CORA B. FLINT, '79- ANNIE M. HOLBROOK, '8o. 



PUBLISHER, 
LILLIE R. POTTER, '80. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '80. MINNIE HOPKINS, '8o. 

TERMS,. IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage), 75 cts. 

Single Numbers, ..... 10 cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


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Frank Wood, Printer, 352 Washington Street, Boston. 

As we sit in our cosy sanctum to-day, 
we think, with a sort of mazed, wondering 
feeling, that it is December ; that winter is 
already upon us, with its flying snow-flakes 
and frozen streams Then, gradually, it 
dawns upon us that, with this month, our 
first term of school closes, and that, with 
the dying of the old year, we shall lay aside 
many a well-worn book — not without a 
tinge of regret, for " there is a touch of 
pathos about doing even the simplest thing 
for the last time." 

How the days and weeks have glided 
away, leaving us in doubt as to whether 
they have ever had an existence, so busy 
have we been ! Yet the approaching ex- 
ercises usual to the close of a term, bear 
witness to the fact that already three 
months of study have come and gone since 
our return to school in the fall. 

With this issue we close our duties as 
editor of the " Leaves"; and gladly resign 
our position to one who may more worthily 
fill the editorial chair. 

It is a fact, conceded by all, that a per- 
son learns to love that for which he works, 
and in which he takes an interest. And so 
we find that our feelings toward the Sem- 
inary paper are somewhat different from 



those with which, only a few months ago, 
we entered our new field of labor. We 
shall always have a hearty hand-shake and 
a cordial welcome for the "Lasell Leaves ; " 
and " long may it wave ! " 

With a "Merry Christmas" and a 
" Happy New Year " to you all, our read- 
ers, we make our editorial bow, and grace- 
fully (?) retire. 



On the evening of Dec. 4. we were 
favored with the second lecture of our 
course, by Professor Butterfield, on " Visi- 
ble Speech." He began by speaking of the 
need that had long been felt for something 
by which a person could understand and 
get the pronunciation of different lan- 
guages. For this purpose a convention 
was held in Europe ; but, after spending 
three weeks, it had come to no decision. 
Mr. Alexander Melville Bell, who had been 
a member of said convention, went home 
with the belief that an invention could be 
made, and with a plan which he brought 
before the public in 1854. 

The lecturer then drew a diagram of the 
mouth on the board, explaining the meth- 
ods of sound, and giving the different char- 
acters that represent the sound. After il- 
lustrating, he requested some members of 
the audience to suggest foreign words, 
which he wrote on the board in the techni- 
cal characters, and pronounced them per- 
fectly. To prove that he did not pro- 
nounce them from the remembrance of their 
sound, he had Mrs. Butterfield retire from 
the room , then more words were given, 
and she, upon returning, spoke them with- 
out difficulty. He then spoke of the bene- 
fit Visible Speech had been to deaf mutes 
and what it would be if introduced into the 
schools ; not as something more for the over- 
worked pupils to attain, but as a means to 
facilitate the acquirement of languages. 



Climb the stairs just as high as you can, 
then turn to the right, and here, away in 
the top of the house, you will find our 
studio. The saying is, "Out of sight, out of 
mind." To this we can never consent, and 
assure our friends that, notwithstanding 
we are away up as near the clouds as we 
can get, we are doing some of the work of 
the world, as any one will see if they will 
take the trouble to find us. Our studio is 
in a very flourishing condition, every easel 



being occupied, and the classes in this de- 
partment are as enthusiastic as any in the 
school. The different departments of cray- 
on work, water-colors and oils, are here 
studied in all their variations, the tendency 
of the students being toward oils. Look 
around our room ; besides sketching in oils 
and crayons, we see casts of Julius Csesar, 
the Greek Slave, cherubs, and, among other 
studies, those of the human features, the 
mouths of which are large enough to 
frighten most small children ; and, perhaps, 
after spending hours in trying to represent 
a nose, some one may ask you if it is a 
lamp-chimney. But after passing through 
the elementary studies, we are promoted to 
heads and landscapes ; and here it is that 
we see the beauties of crayon. Our water- 
color class is not large as to numbers, but 
very correct as to style. In oils, as I said 
before, we find the largest number at work. 
Flowers, landscapes and marines, of various 
descriptions, are in process of completion. 
We do not neglect the decorative line, as 
we have plates, tiles and vases of different 
kinds and styles of ornamentation. Under 
the guidance of our excellent teacher, Miss 
West, our Christmas work is progressing 
rapidly. High above us perches the owl, 
looking as wise as Minerva herself, and 
seeming to smile approval upon our pro- 
ceedings . 



On the evening of Nov. 22, the " S. D." 
Society changed its programme, having 
a mock trial, in place of the debate. 
The case to be tried was that of Miss Wal- 
lace, who was accused of having caused 
the death of Mr. Jenkins, by her designs 
upon his heart. The case was sustained 
with great power on both sides, and the 
gravity of the judge would have done 
credit to a much older and more experi- 
enced one. 

Between the testimony of the witnesses 
and the efforts of the usher to keep the 
small boys on the back seat quiet, the soci- 
ety was kept in a roar of laughter. The 
verdict of " guilty " was brought in by the 
jury ; and, with the room as still as death, 
the judge read the sentence: "One night's 
solitary confinement." 

On the evening of Dec. 6, we had the 
election of officers. The following is the 
result : Miss Atkinson, President ; Miss 
Hatch, Vice-President ; Miss Curtis, Sec- 
retary ; Miss Sanford, Treasurer ; Miss 
Annie Kendig, Critic ; and Miss Boon, 
Usher. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



ill Iigliik 



Mtota 



We know that there are two different 
plans carried on in regard to these studies, 
and that both sides present advantages. 

We know the course pursued by our 
school to be the best, and think we can 
bring its superior merits before the minds 
of our readers by comparing the two plans. 
Imagine ourselves seated in one of the pop- 
ular schools of the day, eagerly attending 
to a class in history, which is to do itself 
honor. One of the pupils is called upon to 
recite the lesson, and goes on, from begin- 
ning to end, without a flaw ; and so they 
all do. But if asked to enlarge upon any 
topic, they utterly fail to do it. Now what 
good is their "Poll-Parrot" style going to 
do them ? A case similar to this lately 
came under our observation. A teacher 
jrom this vicinity was one day visiting a 
school where the teacher was considered 
to be very smart. A pupil in history was 
called upon to recite, and she went through 
the lesson perfectly. At the end, the 
teacher turned to the visitor, and asked if 
she would like to question the pupil ; the 
visitor replied " Yes," and asked her about 
some point in the middle of the lesson ; 
and just because the girl did not have time 
enough to begin the lesson in her own mind, 
and go through until she reached this point, 
she could not answer the question, and had 
no idea what it was. Literature is pursued 
after the same plan ; the different charac- 
ters are taken up, and their lives thorough- 
ly studied about ; but they go no further. 
They do not read any of the author's works, 
thus becoming critics for themselves. 

Here, a history lesson of a certain length 
is given out, and a topic is assigned to each 
one, or the lesson is made shorter, and every 
topic given to all. In this way we know 
every part of the lesson, and when called 
upon can start at the beginning, middle or 
end, to recite. In after years, if ever ques- 
tioned on these things, if we have studied 
faithfully, we shall be able to give a satis- 
factory answer. 

This method requires a great many refer- 
ence-books ; but we have a good library, and 
wish still further to increase our number 
of books. In literature, a character is 
given to us one day, and by referring to as 
many text-books as possible besides our 
own, we learn all wo can about it. The 
next day, or often a longer length of time, 
is employed in reading the works of the 
author; and in this way we learn all the pe- 
culiarities of his or her style, and can crit- 



icise the works in language of our own. 
It may seem to some as if this took too 
long a time ; but we accomplish considera- 
ble, and that is done thoroughly. This 
plan has been, and will continue to be, a 
success with us. 



m l p. a." 

On the 18th of December, a meeting of 
the " Lasell Publishing Association " was 
held, to elect officers for the ensuing term. 
The reports of the retiring officers were 
read and accepted, and some other business 
was transacted. The following officers were 
then elected : President, Miss Flint ; Vice- 
President, Miss Annie Kendig ; Secretary, 
Miss Smith ; Treasurer, Miss Whipple ; 
Editor, Miss Sanford ; Publisher, Miss Cur- 
tis ; Subscription Agent, Miss Colburn; 
Auditing Committee, Misses Morrill and 
Crane. We congratulate ourselves that 
we have obtained capable officers for the 
ensuing term, and we assure our readers 
the association was never more flourishing 
than now. 



The Chapel was comfortably filled on the 
evening of Dec. 18, when the musical re- 
hearsal, usual to the end of each term, took 
place. On account of several vocalists suf- 
fering with colds, a part of the programme 
had to be omitted ; but those who took part 
did credit to themselves and their teachers. 
Misses Hatch and Lane played fine piano 
solos. Misses L. Fisher and M. Phelps ren- 
dered an instrumental duet with good taste. 
" The Storm," a song by Miss Bowen, and 
" A Serenade " by Miss Morrill, were re- 
ceived with great applause. Misses Brown, 
Gowing and Turner, received well-deserved 
encores for their exquisitely rendered in- 
strumental solos. The Chorus Class sang 
twice, under the direction of Professor 
Wheeler, " Let us twine," and " Rest 
thee." 



Fairs seem to be an established fash- 
ion now-a-days ; and, of course, Auburndale 
could not be guilty of such conduct as to 
allow her little Methodist Church to be un- 
fashionable ; so on Wednesday, Dec. 11, 
a Fair was opened in the church, and was 
held afternoons and evenings during the 
remainder of the week. The church was 
beautifully decorated with evergreen, flags 
and bunting. The tables showed that a 
great deal of care and labor had been be- 
stowed upon them, and the wants of all 



were carefully attended to. We congratiu. 
late the young women of the Seminary, on 
their good luck in disposing of their fancy 
articles so well. The first night every- 
thing was carried on in an old-fashioned 
way. From six to eight o'clock, people 
were invited to partake of a regular old- 
fashioned supper. At eight o'clock we 
were favored with an "Old Folks Con- 
cert," which was well carried out, and 
seemed to please all present. On the other 
three nights there were also suitable musical 
entertainments. We must not forget to 
mention the Art Gallery, which was gotten 
up with so much care. Many of the things 
were obtained from abroad ; but from the 
frequent explosions of laughter that were 
heard inside, we are afraid that this fact 
was not fully appreciated. The refresh- 
ment-room was filled each night with lovers 
of ice-cream. Of course, there was the 
usual amount of guessing and electioneer- 
ing ; and the latter was well carried out by 
one of our young women. We add, in 
conclusion, that the Fair was a decided 
success. We were glad no raffling was 
allowed. The Seminary table netted over 
$160 ; the entire Fair, over $600. 



The third lecture in the students' course 
took place on Thursday, Dec. 19. The 
lecturer was Dr. Hamilton, of Saratoga 
Springs. He took for his subject, "The 
Temperaments." 

His genial face appeared among us as 
itself an inspiration to health and happiness. 

A brief introduction, touching upon the 
importance of physiology as a study, and 
of the harmony existing throughout nature, 
so that we may judge of one part by an- 
other, led the way to a careful description 
of the different temperaments, and the 
physical characteristics whereby we can 
know them, at a glance, in different indi- 
viduals. How these may be changed by 
proper methods of treatment, added much 
to the interest. The fact that we are the 
arbiters of our own fortunes, just as we live 
in accordance with the laws of our nature, 
is humiliating, while it is encouraging. 

Three-fourths of all our trouble comes 
from over-taxation of the stomach, and 
want of breathing. 

After the lecture, so intensely interesting 
to the listeners, a happy hour was passed 
in the parlor, where, notwithstanding the 
Doctor had traveled twelve hours, without 
a moment's rest, before the lecture, he por- 
trayed so perfectly the characters of dif 



6 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



ferent students, telling which parent they 
most resembled, and in what particulars, 
the longevity of ancestors and the proba- 
bilities in their own case, as to cause much 
wonder and excitement. 

The unwelcome bell at last caused a com- 
pany of unwilling girls to turn toward 
their rooms ; but they went filled with the 
determination to make the most of them- 
selves in every possible direction. 

la Mimsfiim, 

Lasell Seminary is called, in the order 
of Providence, to mourn the loss of one of 
her former pupils, Mrs. Burlen, of Boston, 
formerly Miss Carrie Damrell. She died 
at her home on Tuesday, Dec. 9, after a 
long and severe illness, which she bore 
with patience and sweetness. Her disease 
had taken a favorable turn, and she was 
radidly improving, when the summons of 
death came suddenly ; but we are told that 
it found her ready, triumphant in her hope 
and trust in Him who would carry her 
through the darkness safely. 

Teachers and pupils who were members 
of this institution four years ago, remem- 
ber her as a quiet, gentle girl, whose fidel- 
ity to duty, and amiability of character, 
made her many frieuds. The Seminary not 
only sorrows for the loss of one of her 
children, but extends its hearty sympathy 
to the bereaved husband and family. 



itiaiitiens, 

Whereas, It has seemed best to the All- 
wise God, to sadden the heart of our school- 
friend, Miss Hattie Haskill, by the death 
of her father ; 

Resolved, I. That we, the members of 
the " S. D." Society, extend to her our 
sympathy and kindliest feelings, in this 
time of sorrow. May she be consoled and 
strengthened by the unfailing promises to 
the fatherless, and receive the divine com- 
fort which only He " who doth not willing- 
ly afflict," can bestow. 

Resolved, II. That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to our bereaved friend, and a 
like copy be inserted in the " Leaves." 

Lucy E. Curtis, 
Lillie R. Potter, 



,} 



Committee. 



Ghrittmas.. 

Christmas is fast approaching, and the 
year of 1878 will soon be gone. As we 
wend our way along the busy streets, we 
cannot help studying the different faces 
around us. The little children are clus- 
tered at the shop windows with frequent 



exclamations of surprise or delight, as they 
spy one beautiful toy after another. They 
are joyous and happy, for they know Santa 
Claus will soon be here with his loads of 
presents, and they are longing for Christ- 
mas Eve to come, so that they can hang 
up their stockings ; and they constantly 
tease their mammas for one of her biggest 
ones. The mothers and fathers are hurry- 
ing along the streets, with anxious looks 
upon their faces, and at night come home 
with their arms full of bundles, which are 
quickly deposited in the closets, to lie there 
until the important day arrives. The elder 
people, our dear grandmothers and grand- 
fathers, are sitting in their large arm-chairs, 
side by side ; and it is with smiles upon 
their faces that they think and talk over 
the Christmas days that have long since 
passed, when they lived on the old home- 
stead, and their children were all gathered 
in one fold. Although they like to dream 
of the past, yet they do not regret that so 
many years have passed, and that they will 
soon be called home by their Heavenly 
Father. 

Christmas Eve the churches are all deco- 
rated with their trees, and the evening is 
spent in pleasant amusement. This cus- 
tom was introduced by the Germans, and 
has always been kept up. Of course all 
this is very delightful to us, and we are 
glad that our ancestors pursued the same 
plan ; but, in all our joy and comfort which 
God has given us, let us not forget the 
poor mothers and fathers who can give 
their children no token of affection. 

Let us think of these things more in the 
future, and try to bring about a more 
cheerful Christmas for those who would en- 
joy it as much as we do. On this day of 
all others, which is celebrated as the anni- 
versary of Christ's birth, should we thank 
God for all the goodness He has shown us 
during the year past, and make good reso- 
lutions for the one to come. 

A " Merry Christmas " and a "Happy 
New Year " to all our readers. 



Mr. Carl Schornhof advertises his " For- 
eign Bookstore" in the "Leaves." We 
speak from experience, when we say that 
he has one of the finest assortments in the 
city. Go and see for yourselves ! 

Mrs. C. S. SMITH, 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

^oxeEics-iT -&.:fcT3D -A.ivd:EEaic-a.asr 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE ACENT FOR 

LITOLFFS CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 4=0 Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



In stock, a great variety of handsomely-bound books for 
the Holidays. 

JUST WAT HAS BEEN WANTED ! . 
A. LADIES LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No, 30 Avon Street, Boston. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE?" 

T. D. COOK. Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Partdzs served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



100 DOLLARS SAVED 

Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

G. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 
BOSTON 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea, . . . . . 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 

Best Barrel of Flour in Boston $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar, 40 cents 

Pure Cassia 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger, 12 cents lb. 

Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1.00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses 60 cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



G. D. GOBB & BROTHERS, 



FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKER 726 and 728 Washington Street 

Rooms over the Post-Office, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



WEBER PIANO. 



The first choice of every Great Vocalist, Pianist 
and Musician in the World. 



READ WHAT THEY SAY. 

"For the last six years your pianos have been my 
choice for the concert-room and my own house."— 
Kellogg. 

"I feel that every one is fortunate who owns a Weber 
Piano, because of its rich and sympathetic quality of 
tone."— Cart. 

"I shall take every opportunity to recommend and 
praise your instruments."— Nilsson. 

" I have used the pianos of every celebrated mater, but 
give yours the preference over all."— Patti. 

"Tour Uprights are extraordinary instruments, and 
deserve their great success."— Lucca. 

"Tour instruments surpass my expectations, and I rank 
you justly as the foremost manufacturer of the day." 
— Murska. 

"Tour instruments have no superior anywhere. I 
certainly have not seen any pianos in America which 
even approach them."— Goddard. 

" I am not surprised that every great artist prefers the 
Weber Pianos; they are truly noble instruments, and 
meet every requirement of the most exacting artist."— 
Careno. 

"Tour pianos astonish me; I assure you that I have 
never yet seen any pianos which equal yours."— Strauss. 

"Mnie. Parepa called your pianos the finest in the 
United States. X fully endorse that opinion. They have 
no rival anywhere."— Wehli. 

"Amongst the manv excellent pianos made in the city, 
the Weber ranks the "foremost."— Mills. 



WAREROOMS: 

FIFTH AVENUE, cor. SIXTEENTH ST., NEW YORK, 

3 BEDFORD STREET, BOSTON. 



W. G-. BAKER & CO. 
Window Shades, Upholstery Goods, Curtain Materials, 

LACE CURTAINS, 

DRAPERIES, ETC. 
83 Bromfield Street, Boston. 



*- vL 



AUBURN DALE, MASS. 
Office Hours: 9-12 A.M.; 1.30-5 p.m. 

SWAN <5c NEWTON, 

HEALERS IX 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Fanenil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

8. B. NEWTON. 

J. -W- ID -A."V" I S , 

AUBURKDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 

MEAL AJfJ) GRAIN WHOLESALE & RETAIL. 

BRANCH GROCERY STORE, 
BOTTON BLOCK, NEWTON LOWER FALL?, MASS. 



Agency for Mme. Dcmorest's Reliable Patterns. 



G10C1BT STOBI, 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au" 
burndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

&£~ All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

JAMES VICKERS, 

Auburn St., Auburn dale. 

N. G-. WOOD & SON, 

tm\tt% ami %\\nt%w\\% t 

T t 

444 Washington Street, . . Boston, 

Next door to Jordan, Marsh & Co's, desire to call special 
attention to their large and beautiful stock of fine goods, 
consisting in-part of 

Diamond Ear-Drops, two stone, from $50 to $1000 per pair. 

Diamond Rings, set in 18 kt. gold, from $25 to $200. 

Gent's Diamond Pins, from $25 to $200. Ladies 

Lace Pins and Lockets, set with Diamonds, 

All of the best quality, which are selling at a very small 
advance from the cost. 

Also, an entire line of fine Gold Jewelry, Ladies' and 
Gents' Waltham Watches, fine Gold Chains, Gorham 
Silver Ware of every description, Silver Plated Ware 
from the best manufacturers io the country; French 
Clocks, Bronzes, and every other kind of goods usually 
found in a first-class Jewe.ry store. 

All our goods marked in plain Jigures. 

WIVI. WEST <Sc CO. 

7 HANOVER ST., BOSTON, three doors from Court St. 
Manufacturers of 

Pure Confectionery & SuperiorWedding Cakes 

All kinds of Cake, of the finest quality, at wholesale 
and retail. 



J. H. ROBINSON & CO. 

Formerly Gregory & Robinson, 

Xx3Q.porters, To'cbers a.ia.d. ISetailers 
— OF — 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Paper Hangings, 

406 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 

JOHN H. ROBINSON. 

CHAS. H. WH1TMARSH. 
CHAS. W. ROBINSON. 



Very large stock of School and Miscellaneous 

Books, in ancient and modern languages. 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 
(Successor to Schoenhof & Moeller), 
40 Winter St., Boston. 

CROSBY & FOSS, 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS, 

IIiivc Removed to 

421 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Fifth store north of Winter Street. 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




PORTRAITS 



In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon and Ink. 

C. M. LITCHFIELD. w. LORING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Aitliti' Material 

Of Every Description, 

N0S. 33 & 35 C0RNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




ORIENTAL TEA CO. 



87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters aud Dealers in 



COFFEE 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburndale, free 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Abram French & Co. 



IMPORTERS OF 



CIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII J^y, 
CROCKERY 

china, 

GLASSWARE AND FANCY GOODS, 

SILVER-PLATED WARE, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

89, 91 & 93 FRANKLIN STREET, Corner Devonshire, 

ABRAM FRENCH, f t L. G. COBURN. 

JOHN T. WELLS. S J3 Q STON \ WM ' A - FRENCH. 
L. E. CASWELL. ) (.S.WA 



I.WALDO FRENCH. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, & 4 PARK ST., BOSTON. 

PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. faris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



^lass plt0t0gra$Jt£rs* 



COPYING 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink 
Water Color and Oil. 



Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

Stationers and flank foot Manufacturers. 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAY. 



N 



OT/ViAN, 



IJPh oto0trapher^ 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, Park Street. 

STTTIDIO : 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 



THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls. 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

NICHOLS cfe; JE31-£^JLsJL> 7 
Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLAKE BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street. - - - BOSTON. 
G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO, 

auburn street, AUBURNOALE, MASS. 




C SARGENT BIRD, 

Patent Medicines, Fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 



HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST. 



AUBURNOALE, MASS. 



FRANK WOOD, 

— STEAM PRINTER — 

No. 352 Washington Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School "Work. 

"white, SMITH & CO. 

516 Washington Street, Boston. Music Publishers 

and Dealers in Sheet Music and Music Books, Vocal 

and Piano Studies, both Foreign and American, 

Instruction and Recreation Books, the New 

Cantatas of "Ruth" and "Joseph." Also 

Publishers of "The Folio," the great 

Musical Monthly, only $1.60 a year. 

W. D. X-A.THROr> T 

AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK & BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

WATERS & INMAN, 

DEALERS IN 

COAL, WOOD, HA Y, STRA W, LIME, 

Cement, Plaster, Hair, and Drain Pipe. 

Orders will receive prompt attention. 
WEST NEWTON -and- AUBURNDALE. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 

UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 
BOSTON. 

THOMAS HALL, 

Manufacturing Electrician and Optician, dealer 
in all kinds of Telegraphic and Electrical Instruments, 
Wire, Batteries, Materials, etc. Hall's Patent Electric 
Bells and Batteries, for dwelling-house;?, hotels, factories, 
steamboats, banks, and railroad depots. 

Stock, Instruments and Chemicals for Telegraph Lines, 
supplied at lowest rates. 

No. 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 
Established in 1835. See Hall's Illustrated Telegraph Catalogue. 



Frames, 

Engravings, 
Albums, 

Pa sse-partouts r 
Etc., Etc. 

C. A. PERKINS & CO. 

Successors to 
COLLIER & PERKINS, 

No. 361 "Washington Street. 

-. . g 

ALFRED DE^£=LXJSI3: 7 



Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 



LADIES AND GEWTLEHEJI 

Visiting Boston, either on business or pleasure, should 
not fail to call at 

Learned & Oo.'s new and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

413 Washington Street. 



EMILY METCALF, M. D. 
Corner Main & Moody Streets, WALTHAM 

Office hours, 1 to 5 p. m., and evenings usually. 

DEALER IN 

PEOVISIONS, 

COR. AUBUEN & LEXINGTON STS, 

FURNITURE 

IMPORTED EXPRESSLY FOR 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S GIFTS. 

USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL. 

Now on Exhibition at Paine's Warerooms, 141 Friend St. 

PBICE-IilST, Wholesale and Retail. 
Bouquet Stands, new designs, $2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 15, 25, SO, to 

$50. 
Bible Stands, useful and ornamental, $4, 5, 8, 1C, 15, 18,. 

20, 30, to $75. 
Pedestals, French, $7, 10, 15. 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and $50. 
Jardinieres, of most beautiful designs, entirely new 

styles, $5, 10, 15, 25, to $35. 
Work Tables, very pretty, new patterns, $2, 5, 8, 10, 12, 

15, 20, 25, $40. 
Writing Desks, convenient and elegant, $12, 15, 20, 25, 30,. 

35, 50, 60, to $150. 
Camp Chairs, in every style, $2, 3, 3.50, 4, 6, 7.70, 8, 10, to- 

$50. 
Folding Chairs, a very useful present, $6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14,. 

18, 25, 30, to $45. 
Music Portfolios, Racks and Screens, $6, 8, 10, 12, 15,20,. 

25, 30, 35 to $75. 
Clocks, French and American, $2, 2.50, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 

15 and $25. 
Bronze Ornaments, French, $2.50, 4, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35, to $65. 
Alabaster, for Mantel Ornaments, from Italy, 50c, $1, 2,. 

3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 16, to $35. 
Marqueterie Tables, from Paris, $30, 45, 75, 125, 150 and 

$200. 
Parlor Tables, very rich, $15, 18, 20, 25, 35, 45, to $100. 
Brackets, new styles, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, 2, 2.50, 2.75, 3, 4, 5, 

6, 7, 8, 9 and $10. 
Fancy Reception and Turkish Chairs, $S, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15 r 

17. 19, 25, 35, 50, to $85. 
Foot Rests, $5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, $15. 
Blacking Cases, Black Walnut, with Drawers and Slide, 

$5, 5 50 and $6. 
Etageres, most elegant, $28, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, to $125. 
Parlor Cabinets, from Paris, $55, 75, 125, 150, 175, 250 and 

$300. 
Hanging Flower-pot Holders, $1.50 to $15. 
Piano Stools, $5, 6. 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, to $50. 
Card Receivers, $3, 4, 6, 8, to $25. Aquariums, $15. 
Shaving Stands for dressing-rooms, $15, 20, 25, 35, to $50 
Girls' and Boy's Chamber Suites, $22, 25, 28, 30, 35, to $75. 

Works of art, in figures and bas reliefs, from Copen- 
hagen, making a most wonderful display, which we are 
now selling at the very lowest importing prices. 



141 Friend Street, «fe 48 Canal Street. 

J. S. PAINE. 





FIE IVLUXT^. FACTI.' 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBIJRNDALE, MASS., JANUARY, 1879. 



Number 4. 



CARPETS! 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS 4 CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

In New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as we do, largo quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, we can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regaiMs quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BOSTON. 



The same evening that this poem was 
read in Boston, our favorite lecturer, James 
T. Field, read it before an attentive audi- 
ence in Worcester, Mass. 

BAYARD TAYLOR. 

LONGFELLOW'S POEM, BEAD AT THE BOSTON 
MEMORIAL MEETING, FRIDAY EVENING. 

Dead he lay among his books! 
The peace of God was in his looks. 

As the statues,* in the gloom, 
Watch o'er Maximillian's tomb, 

So those volumes, from their shelves, 
Watched him, silent as themselves. 

Ah ! his hand will never more 
Turn their storied pages o'er ; 

Never more his lips repeat 
. Songs of theirs, however sweet. 

Let the lifeless body rest! 

He is gone who was its guest — 

Gone as travelers haste to leave 
An inn, nor tarry until eve. 

Traveler, in what realms afar, 
In what planet, in what star, 

In what vast aerial space, 
Shines the light upon thy face? 

In what gardens of delight 
Rest thy weary feet to-night? 

Poet, thou whose latest verse 
Was a garner on thy hearse, 

Thou hast sung with organ tone 
In Deukalion's life thine own : 

On the ruins of the Past 
Blooms the perfect flower at last. 

Friend, but yesterday the bells 
Rang for thee their loud farewells : 

And to-day they toll for thee, 
Lying dead beyond the sea — 

Lying dead among thy books, 
The peace of God in all thy looks. 
* In the Hof kirche at Innsbruck. 



Em, L®eh laMi© to lew Yosts. 

Our trip from the Scottish lakes to Glas- 
gow was not very pleasant, as there were 
several disagreeable things to contend 
with. For instance : after leaving the Loch 
Katrine steamer at Ballock, a small town 
on that lake, we were to take the railway 
cars for Glasgow. We had, all through 



the summer, traveled as second-class pas- 
sengers ; so to save trouble and confusion, 
we purchased our tickets before leaving 
the steamer. When we arrived at the 
train we found no second-class carriages, 
so, as usual, stepped into first-class carriages. 
The train was about to start, when the con- 
ductor came and defnanded our tickets ; and 
when he saw them, ordered us out into a 
third-class carriage. Of course, we were 
very much provoked, and thought that he 
had no right to make us travel third-class. 

Arrived at the Hotel Minerva, Glasgow, 
where we met our leader, early in the 
evening ; and, after a hearty dinner, assem- 
bled in the parlor, to say our adieus to 
those whom we were to leave. 

Of Glasgow I can say but little, as I did 
not see much of the city ; but I am certain 
that it is the most filthy place, next to Liv- 
erpool, that we visited all the time that we 
were abroad. 

Left Glasgow at nine o'clock Tuesday, 
a.m., with the anticipation of a pleasant 
sail down the Clyde to Liverpool. Al- 
though the day was very cloudy, and it 
rained somewhat during the forenoon, we 
enjoyed ourselves very much ; especially 
when we stopped at Greenoch, and stayed 
four hours, loading freight. 

When we entered the Irish Sea the 
water became rougher, and we were afraid 
of being sick ; but, by singing and joking, 
managed to keep well. 

In the evening those who remained on 
deck enjoyed the singing of Scottish songs, 
by some young men. The next morning 
dawned bright and clear, and by eight 
a. m. we arrived at the Liverpool dock. 

After some trouble, and much walking 
through mud and water, wc arrived on 
board the " Queen ; " and, depositing our 
baggage and arranging our state-rooms, 
went on deck to view the city. 

At four o'clock the steamer started, 
and we were finally on our way home 
again. Although we had had such a pleas- 
ant trip, and regretted to leave Europe, 
none of us were sorry to turn our faces 
toward home. 

At Queenstown more passengers came 
on board, and once more we were on our 
journey. None of us were sea-sick until 



LASELL LEAVES. 



the third day ; but then well, I will 

leave the sensation to your own imagina- 
tions. Profiting by the experience, we 
knew better than to remain down stairs, 
so stayed on deck, through all kinds of 
weather. 

The fourth day out was just perfect — a 
calm sea, and the sun shining gloriously; 
but after that, the next five days were fear- 
fully rough. 

A young gentleman, on seeing a young 
lady sick, remarked, " The idea of being 
sea-sick on a river ; " but not long after he 
was taken sick, and we turned the tables, 
and made fun of him. 

The captain was a very pleasant gentle- 
man, and tried his best to make everything 
pleasant for us ; but one thing that he in- 
sisted upon was promenading. He obliged 
every gentleman to take a lady, or two if 
he liked, and promenade just before, and 
immediately after, dinner. 

During the last half of our journey we 
had a full moon, and the beautiful scenery 
was enjoyed by one and all. On all the 
ocean steamers the captains are bound to 
have religious service of some denomina- 
tion on Sunday ; so, as there were three 
ministers on board, Episcopal service was 
appointed for the first Sunday ; but, as 
none of the passengers could muster cour- 
age to remain below long enough to listen 
to a sermon, it was postponed until the 
next Sabbath. When Sunday came, the 
day was so pleasant that the service was 
held on deck, and every one attended. 

Sunday evening, when we came up from 
dinner, and caught the first glimpse of land, 
we all burst out as of one accord, singing, 
" America," and sung it over and over 
again. 

At eleven o'clock we anchored off Sandy 
Hook, and did not start again until the 
next morning at two o'clock, when we 
sailed into New York bay. But there 
were Custom House papers to be signed, 
trunks to be packed, and " Good-bys " to 
be said ; so it was eight o'clock before we 
could land. Saying " good-by " is the 
hardest of all ; we had formed so many 
pleasant acquaintances that, of course, we 
were sorry to leave them, probably never 
to see them again. 

Although our friends were on the wharf, 
they could not come to us until our bag- 
gage had been examined by Custom House 
officers. After remaining a few hours in 
the city, we all left for our respective 
homes, and perhaps we were not glad to 
get home again. 



I guess I'll abscond ! 

" Oh, for a sleigh-ride ! " 

What does Dr. Wayland say on the sub- 
ject ? 

Popular song of Happy Hall : " She's 
a darling, she's a daisy." Ask . Miss T. 
for the rest. 

Now is the time that you see terror and 
disgust depicted on the face of the Juniors 
at mention of the 20th of March. 

We expect, by the end of the term, the 
Seniors can give all the " evidence" neces- 
sary. 

If you want to know the date of any 
event, ask Lucy. She will come within a 
century of it, at least. 

The poor girls who were in such sus- 
pense as to whether they were on the 
" Self- governed," or not, have had their 
hearts set at rest at last. 

The snow detained many of our students 
who were on their way to " Saints' Rest." 
" It's an ill wind that blows nobody any 
good." 

The Seniors think of petitioning for a 
new recitation-room, for their especial use, 
as they are about disgusted with having to 
move around, to make room for some one 
else, every time. 

Teacher — " Where is Pittsburgh ?" Jun- 
ior — "Some where between Mexico and 
the Mississippi." O-o-o-h ! We recommend 
said junior as assistant teacher in geogra- 
phy- 

The halls look natural once more, and are 
quite safe now that the trunks have been 
removed ; but for a short time after re- 
turning, it was rather " dangerous passing," 
as the torn dresses and lame ankles will 
prove. 

Teacher — "Miss , is the 'iEneid' 

written in Greek or Latin ? " Miss , with 

great decision — "In Greek." Teacher — 
"What are you now reading in Latin?" 

Miss , with a little less assurance — 

" 'Virgil's iEneid.' " 

We are to be pleasantly entertained on 
Saturday afternoons, by Miss Parloa's cook- 
ing lectures. There is also to be a private 
cooking class, for any pupils desiring in- 
struction in this useful branch, for which 
class we expect there will be a large num- 
ber of students, who will be, at the end of 



the term, proficient cooks, under the skillful 
training of Miss Parloa. 

Prof, gave a number of the "young 
women," the other Saturday, a very pleas- 
ant sleigh-ride through West Newton and 
Waltham. And the look of envy seen on 
the faces of those poor girls who were left 
at home, as they saw them depart, drawn 
by the "fiery steed "(?) of Lasell, was simply 
indescribable. 

Girls, be on your guard ! for we should 
not be surprised if, the next Monday morn- 
ing question, apropos to the one, "Name 
the presidents in order," should be, "Give 
the books of the Old Testament." It 
would be well to be prepared. We thought 
so ; and, alas ! we were unprepared. 



Pmoiiili. 

We gladly welcome the new girls who 
come to us this term, and hope that they 
may gain both pleasure and profit from the 
school. Miss Curry seems like one of our 
old girls, her name is so familiar, and we 
think she will soon occupy her sister's 
vacant place among us. 

It seems a little strange to see any one 
so young as Miss Small occupying the 
place of a student ; but we are sure " The 
Child of the Regiment" will find her way 
into all our hearts. 

We hear, through some of our Boston 
friends, that Miss Josie Adams, lately of 
this school, is soon to be joined " in the 
holy bonds of wedlock " with the hand- 
somest and richest gentleman now at 
Harvard. We would like to see the man ! ! 

A short time ago we received a call 
from some of the " old girls" — Miss Smith, 
of Boston, and Miss Miller, of Auburndale. 
We are glad they still think of us. 

Miss Alderman cheered us with her 
happy face a few days since. We hope 
she arrived home safely, although there is 
hardly room for a doubt, as the gentleman 
she was with looked capable (?) of taking 
care of her. 

We learn through correspondents that 
Miss Alice Dunsmore, of '78, is now visit- 
ing one of her class-mates in Kentucky. 
We know she will have a good time, for 
"our little rebel" has the real Southern 
hospitality. 

Is it "better to have loved and lost, than 
never to have loved at all ? " We almost 
doubt it, as we look around for a few famil- 
iar faces of last term, but do not find them. 



L A S E L L LEAVES 



The " S. D.'s" greatly feel their loss, for 
most of them were members ; but the magic 
pin is a bond of union between us, and we 
can never be entirely separated. 

Marriage bells have rung again, and the 
late Miss Louise Hawley is now Mrs. James 
Sanders. So the old girls leave us ! The 
wedding, which was quite a grand affair, 
took place at the bride's home in Aurora, 
111., but their permanent home will be in 
Southbridge. 

Some of the old girls will remember Miss 
Wheelock, our former teacher in Vocal, and 
will be glad to hear of her success abroad. 
A London paper speaks of her in very high 
terms, by saying that "she is the finest 
American singer now upon the lyric stage." 
We shall hardly recognize our old friend 
when she returns. 



We find several new exchanges on our 
table this term, which hail from different 
parts of the globe. We are glad to receive 
them, and to learn about our brother and 
sister schools, who are working with us to 
climb the " hill of knowledge." 

The Acta Scholasiica, which has just had 
birth in New York, is a bright little jour- 
nal, and, we think, will be quite an addi- 
tion to our exchange table ; but, as it is 
their first attempt, and they wish "to be 
very mildly criticised," we will reserve 
further remarks for another time. 

Another journal, from which both teach- 
ers and scholars may gain useful informa- 
tion, is the Randolph Macon Monthly, which 
hails from Virginia. 

We include the Vidette in the list of our 
best exchanges. But we think they must 
have been dreaming of "home and mother," 
when, under the heading, "A Letter from 
Lasell Seminary," they told us about that 
wonderful telephone, purchased by the 
school, which had both a terrestrial and 
celestial eye-piece, besides a sun- glass. Such 
telephones have not yet reached the "Hub." 
Would the editors please send us a fuller 
description ! 

We should judge our friends of the 
Argosy supposed the young women of the 
Seminary to be "woman's rights" — or 
that it were "leap-year;" but as neither 
supposition is true, the criticism which was 
made falls harmless to the ground. 

The first telescope was probably used in 
England in 1608. 



During the reign of the Roman Em- 
peror whom the people of those times 
were pleased to st3'le""the delight of man- 
kind/' there were two beautiful cities sit- 
uated at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius and on 
the Bay of Naples. 

We can surely say, "Beautiful for situa- 
tion ; " for, at that time, before Vesuvius 
had opened its mouth and poured forth that 
fiery stream which caused death and de- 
struction wherever it went, its slopes were 
cultivated by the inhabitants who lived in 
villages at its base ; and it added beauty to 
the surrounding country, for its sides were 
covered with vineyards, whose luxurious 
fruit was gathered in harvest-time by the 
dark-complexioned boys and girls of that 
eastern clime. 

Although hundreds of years ago, the sun 
shone just as brightly on that May morning 
as it does now. Children were playing in 
houses and streets ; mothers were at their 
daily tasks ; young ladies at their toilet ; 
and men in their places of business, discuss- 
ing city and state affairs then, just as they 
are to-day in our many cities. 

All was rife with life and enthusiasm, 
when suddenly the sky grew black and 
cinders began to fall thick in the streets. 
Before children could run to parents, or 
husbands reach their wives, the fiery flood 
was upon them, fixing each man, woman 
and child where they stood. 

Silent cities ! the tramp of many feet, 
passing to and fro through their thorough- 
fares, is heard no more ; music and laughter, 
ringing through the streets, is hushed for- 
ever; the mother's song, cooing her babe to 
sleep, and the lover's sweet story, will never 
again be heard in those homes ; for all is 
silent now, and the hundreds who inhabited 
those towns fell asleep together. 

But these are not the only cities I should 
call silent. Are not ancient Rome, Athens 
and Sparta comparatively silent now to 
what they used to be ? Think of the Eter- 
nal City, in its ancient glory and magnifi- 
cence ! The " Forum," which was then filled 
with the business and traffic of the day, is 
empty now. Grand old palaces, which 
were beautiful for their architecture, are 
crumbling. Capitols and courts which 
were frequented by Virgil, Cicero, Homel- 
and other great men, who lived in the time 
of Rome's glory, are disappearing. Can- 
not we say, silent cities ? Their grandeur 
and splendor are all gone, and they lie, to- 
day, like ruined castles, under this autum- 
nal sky. 



" Go thou to Rome, at once the 
Paradise, the grave, the city and the wilderness, 
And where its wrecks like shattered monuments 

rise, 
And flowering weeds and fragrant copses dress 

the bones of Desolation's nakedness." 



Beauty of the face is what most people 
mean when they use the word. But, in 
truth, beauty is seldom seen in a human 
face. I call beauty a spiritual perfection, 
which is sometimes visible in the form and 
countenance ; it is essentially a part of life, 
feeling, character ; a result of their harmoni- 
ous combination. — Davis. 

If beauty were lasting, it would be the 
most tyrannical influence in life. Luckily 
for us poor slaves, it is a despotism which 
never endures. Hence, the feverish anxiety 
of beauty to wield the scepter betimes, and 
to enjoy the good things that were designed 
for it. 

" Beauty when unadorned is adorned the 
most" is an old saying ; but, if it were prac- 
tically applied in our daily lives, most of us 
would not only attain much nearer true 
beauty, but save much time, gain far greater 
comfort for ourselves, and exert an influence, 
by our example, worthy of imitation. The 
most beautiful women detract from their 
beauty by cosmetics, ungraceful contortions 
of the hair, and numerous conformities to 
outlandish fashions which do much to de- 
tract or destroy the beautiful contour of the 
most lovely face and figure ; while the 
homely faces are made almost repulsive by 
the weakest of men's silly inventions to 
make a perhaps noble, or good, homely face 
handsome. To study real grace or adorn- 
ment, and simple becoming styles that are 
best suited to the individual, is the only 
safe rule for adornment. ~ E. B. G. 

A man who has no enemies is seldom 
good for anything. He is made of that 
kind of material which is so easily worked 
that everyone tries a hand in it. If you 
stop to dispute, you do but as they desire, 
and open the way for more abuse. Let the 
poor fellows talk. There will be a reaction, 
if you do but perform your duty ; and hun- 
dreds who were once alienated from you 
will flock to you, and acknowledge their 
error. — Selected. 



Scientific and Industrial. 

The first sun-photograph of the human 
face was made in 1839, by Prof. J. W. 
Draper, of New York. 



L A S E L L LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE — 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
IRENE G. SANFORD, ' 7 g. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '80. S. ROUETTE BOWEN, "8i. 

PUBLISHER, 
LUCY CURTIS, '8o. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
NELLIE WHIPPLE. MATTIE RANSOM. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 



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W 



We venture to assume that it is not too 
late to wish all our readers a " Happy New 
Year," teachers, pupils, friends, and may 
none of our pleasant relations together be 
disturbed. The record of another year, for 
good or ill, or both blended, is closed. We 
may look back with regret on many actions, 
and think if we could only live the year 
over, how much better we would live it. 
But that cannot be ; 1878 has gone forever. 
In writing for the first time the figures 
1879, what suggestions arise in our minds 
concerning the trials and happiness that 
the New Year may bear in its hands for us. 
To the young, there seems nothing but 
pleasure in the transit from the old year to 
the new ; for it brings them so much nearer 
the longed-for manhood or womanhood. 

To the middle-aged and old, each year is 
one nearer to their "home over. there," 
" where the weary are at rest." 

How many of . our schoolmates and 
friends, we wonder, have made their first 
entry on the fresh white page of their 



diaries, solemnly promising themselves to 
continue in the practice until the 31st of 
December, each night writing down the 
day's experiences. How many, too, have 
carefully ruled off their expense books, de- 
termining to put down the minutest items, 
and make the balance at the end of the 
year so correct, that the most expert book- 
keeper could find no flaw. And it would 
be positively unkind, I am sure, for any of 
us to look over their shoulders at the end 
of the year, and ask, " Why so many 
'blank pages' in the diary?" "Why so 
many sundries in the account book ? " 

But I suppose it will still continue to be 
so through all the years to come. I have 
noticed that the people of to-day seem to 
think there is no day but New Year's in 
which, new resolutions can be made. The 
recording angel has his book full of resolu- 
tions made on New Year's day ; but many 
of them, I am afraid, he remembers much 
longer than the person who made them. 

If the " new leaf" becomes blotted soon 
after it is turned, another year must elapse 
before a fresh resolution can be made. 
Many, however, I am happy to say, do ad- 
here to their resolutions until the end of 
the year ; the others only proving the truth 
of the saying, " There are exceptions to 
every rule." 

Is our new year to be a new one indeed, 
or only an old one repeated ? Are we to 
be controlled by new purposes, or are we to 
be governed, as before, by aims that our 
true self tell us are unworthy of us ? In 
closing I would say, that the eventful year 
for the "glorious class of '79" has at last 
arrived, the year so long looked forward 
to as the one in which they would bid fare- 
well to their school-days ; and only too 
soon will the time come when they 

" Will stand, 
With a scared look on their faces, 
An essay in their hand," 

make their bow, and retire gracefully (?) 
from the classic halls of their Alma Mater. 



i' J § 1st 



Dear Mrs< — We have had our floor var- 
nished Can Jennie stay to thanksgiving 
and you come to and bring your Father to 
I have had a good time with Jennie Joe 
and Charlie and I was walking out in the 
fields and we found a stick that looks like 
a monkey I dressed it up it has a neck- 
tie it has a coat and a vest and Mother is 
going to make it a pair of pants so good 
by. from 



j if On liiikr 

There are two lives — one earthly, the 
other heavenly ; one born of the flesh, the 
other of the spirit. Things real minister 
to the first, things ideal to the last. There 
are two worlds — one, gross, material ; the 
other refined, spiritual. There are two uni- 
verses — one breaks on the outward senses, 
the other shines only on the spiritual sight ; 
but they are related to each other, as nut 
and shell, as body and soul. That which 
belongs to the outward life we would de- 
nominate the real ; that which rises before 
our minds and glitters on the walls of the 
spirit's chambers, we call the ideal. Be- 
tween these forces all men are suspended, 
as planets hung in the sky ; earth is on 
one side, heaven on the other : the evil one 
holds on from below ; God invites from 
above. 

It has been said, " Man is an animal and 
something more." This " something more " 
is mind, or soul. This soul is wondrously 
constructed ; it is a little world within 
itself, and within it is a hall where memory, 
by a curious law of her own, brings all 
relics of the past, and hangs them on her 
walls. This power is called the imagina- 
tion, because the image-making faculty is 
involved. The results accomplished maybe 
compared to the architect in his work : 
when he begins he uses the raw materials 
nature furnishes. Whether they be mar- 
ble or stone, he can create nothing out of 
which to shape his plan. He may polish 
the marble until it reflect his image ; he 
may carve the stone into more beautiful 
shape — yet they remain only marble or 
stone. Thus he is limited in the material 
he may use ; yet out of them he can build 
a palace or a hovel, a temple or a prisoner's 
cell; he can span Niagara with its suspen- 
sion bridge, or throw a foot-path across the 
meanest stream. 

Thus we find the power ever busy map- 
ping and planning ; it is the draughting- 
room of the mind. Out of all these plans 
the thinking power, the Treason, picks those 
that are useful or beautiful, and throws the 
useless aside. This selection gives us our 
ideal standards — the model from which the 
sculptor carves his statue, the artist pic- 
tures his canvas. The ideal is in advance 
of the real ; it paints ahead of the brush ; it 
carves in advance of the chisel. These 
ideals are not dreams ; they are not fancies : 
they have an existence as real as the rocks, 
a use as necessary as iron or food : they 
are not confined to poets and novelists ; 
they exist just as truly of a dinner as of a 
poem, of a head-dress as of a novel. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Now, how does a good housewife get up 
a dinuer? Would she send a "heathen 
Chinee " into the kitchen, and await the 
result in the parlor ? The result would be 
a bowl of rice and a set of chop-sticks; and 
the " heathen " would not set them out as 
the first things he could find, but would 
hunt them from a full pantry. And why ? 
Because they express his ideal of what a 
dinner ought to be. And why would her 
guests be disgusted ? For the simple rea- 
son that they have a very different idea 
of a dinner. 

Would she send a blind man to bring out 
the contents of the pantry, filling the table 
with anything he could grasp ? Why, the 
result would be a confusion of dishes. 
But why not have a confusion of dishes ? 
They would taste as well for dinner as for 
breakfast ; they would nourish as well for 
supper as for dinner — simply because we 
have an idea of sense and propriety about 
a dinner, as we have about a painting, or a 
party dress. The lady had in her mind, be- 
fore entering the kitchen, a general plan for 
preparing dinner — an idea of what it ought 
to be. So, too, she has for all her house- 
hold duties, as the decoration of her parlor, 
the furnishing of her sitting-room, the ar- 
rangement of her kitchen. 

Now, we shall find for everything, from 
the common daily duties up to the building 
of St. Paul's Cathedral, men act under these 
general rules, these ideals. They form the 
great line that separates us from the heath- 
en, who have no conception of progress. 

These ideals are derived from our past 
experiences ; and since they are derived 
from them, they are good or bad, high or 
low, according to the nature of that expe- 
rience. 

We are ever striving to attain to these 
ideals ; they become our standards, the end 
of our ambition. Rising as they 'do from 
the past, they cast a shadow that is ever 
fleeing before us, which we are ever pursu- 
ing, but cannot overtake. 

If we form these ideals correctly and 
well, no matter what occupation we follow, 
each will be the better and the holier. 

Adam called his house "heaven and 
earth;" Caesar called his " Rome ;" you 
may call yours a cobbler's trade, or a 
scholar's garret ; yet, line for line and point 
for point, your dominion is as great as 
theirs. Build, therefore, your own world, 
as fast as you conform your life to the pure 
idea in your minds; that will unfold its 
great proportion. 



Through the columns of the Aurora Even- 



ing Post, we were able to obtain a more 
extended account of the marriage of Miss 
Louise Hawley. It was one of the most 
brilliant weddings that had taken place for 
some time in that city. The residence of 
the bride, being appropriately decorated, 
was filled with invited guests, all on the 
qui vive for the entrance of the bridal par- 
ty, which took place about 1 p. m. The 
bride was attired in white gros-grain silk, 
with brocade overdress, trimmed with 
Duchess lace and the customary orange 
blossoms ; her only jewelry being a neck- 
lace and ear-rings of pearls, the gift of her 
husband. There were about thirty-five ele- 
gant presents, both useful and ornamental. 
The wedded pair started on the evening 
train for their future home in Southbridge, 
attended by the good wishes of all their 
friends. 

Two men were riding in the cars on the 
Danbury railway the other morning, when 
one asked the other if he had a pleasant 
place of residence. " Yes," was the reply; 
" we have seven nice large rooms over a 
store." " Over a store! I shouldn't think 
that would be a quiet place." "Oh, it is 
quiet enough ; the folks don't advertise." 
" Ah ! I see," said his friend, in a tone of 
relief. 

For the last few weeks one of our favor- 
ite lecturers, Mr. James T. Fields, has 
been giving a course of six lectures before 
large and attentive audiences in Worces- 
ter. His subjects were Tennyson, Sidney 
Smith, Keats and Shelly, Hood, Longfellow, 
and Fiction and its Eminent Authors. Al- 
though he was greatly appreciated by our 
friends in Worcester, yet we are sure not 
more than by the Lasellites. We shall be 
much disappointed if he does not give us 
one of his charming lectures this winter. 



tie IfrsI, 

" One morn :i Peri at the gate 
Of Kden stood, disconsolate; 
And, as she listened to the springs 
Of life within, like music flowing, 
And caught the light upon her wings 
Through the half-open portal glowing, 
She wept to think her recreant race 
Should e'er have lost that glorious place." 

This Peri thought of the happy angels 
within heaven, who wandered by flowers 
that never fade ; who sipped from streams 
that never grew stagnant. Then she be- 
gan to compare this earth's beauties with 
heaven's ; she spoke of the 

•• Sunny lake of cool Cashmere, 
With its plane-tree isle reflected clear; " 



of the beautiful stars that send down such 
showers of light from above. " But," she 
exclaimed, 

"One minute of heaven is worth them all." 

The angel who kept the gates of the 
Beautiful City beheld the Peri weeping, 
and, pitying her, thus spoke : 

" 'Tis written in the Book of Fate, 
The Peri yet may be forgiven, 
Who brings to this eternal gate 
The gift that is most dear to heaven." 

As soon as the morning star ushered in 
the day, the Peri flew down the " blue vault 
of heaven." But whither could she go ? 
She knew where rubies, diamonds and other 
rare jewels could be found ; but, surely, these 
were not gifts to carry to that gate of 
light. She aroused herself from her med- 
itation, and saw beneath her the beautiful 
land of India — a land where mountains 
rise into towering peaks which protect 
fertile valleys rich in sandal groves and 
bowers of spice, and rivers whose waters 
run o'er golden sands ; but now these 
streams are tainted with human blood, and 
this sweet Indian land lies trembling at 
the feet of a stranger, a base conqueror. 

The Peri saw this sad scene of battle. 
But oh ! most sad, she saw a youth stand- 
ing by his native river, with a broken blade 
in his hand, and the last arrow in his 
quiver. The conqueror looked at him, 
and said, " You can live to share my tro- 
phies and crowns." The youth pointed to 
his native river, crimson with his country's 
blood, then sent his best arrow toward the 
coward's heart. The dart, well aimed, 
missed the intended mark : 

" The hero fell, the tyrant lived." 

So, when the battle ended, the Peri de- 
scended on the first ray of the rising sun, 
and caught the last drop of blood the 
hero shed. Then she thought, " This must 
be the gift the angel requires of me ; " for, — 

" If there be, on this earthly sphere, 
A boon, an offering Heaven holds dear, 
'Tis the last libation Liberty draws 
From the heart that bleeds and breaks in her 
cause!" 

But the angel said, 

* * * "holier far 
Than e'en this drop, the boon must be 
That ope's the gates of heaven for thee." 

After the Peri's first hope was blighted, 
she winged her flight to the south, in 
Africa's sunny land. Oh ! the beauties 
she beheld here — the golden fruit — the 
date-trees, softly bending in the gentle 
breeze; and the wonderful lilies, who, all 



6 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



night long, bathe in some pure stream of 
water. But, even in this paradise, a plague 
had broken out ; on rich and poor the sun 
arose : on rich and poor he sent his last 
rays ; then the moon came forth so sadly, 
and shed tears of dew upon the deathly 
scene 

As the Peri stood, gazing, pitying, she 
saw a youth walk, from the heated room 
and glaring light, to the cool bed that 
Nature gives to one and all alike ; there, 
alone, this youth laid down to die — not 
one to slake his thirst; not one to say, 
" God bless you ! " Oh, what a death ! But 
one thought alone made him happy; and it 
was this: that she whom he loved was 
safe from this foul "midnight breath" — 
was under the tender care of a loving 
father. But lo ! within that bower of spice 
a maiden steals ; and, flinging herself at 
her lover's feet, she cries : 

" Oh, let me only breathe the air, 

The blessed air that's breathed by thee ; 
And whether, on its wing, it bear healing or 
death, 
'Tis sweet to me." 

With one last, fond look, the lover dies : a 
kiss — and the maiden "sleeps the sleep 
that knows no waking on this river's shore." 
" Sleep," the Peri said, as she stole the 
last sigh the maiden gave : 

" Sleep on, in visions of odor rest! " 
Morn was breaking. So the Peri carried 
to the gate of heaven the sigh the maiden 
died in giving. The angel said: 

" True was the maiden ; 
And her story, written in light on Allah's head, 
By seraph eyes shall long be read. 
But, Peri, see! the crystal bar moves not; 
Holier far than e'en this sigh the boon must be, 
That ope's the gates of heaven for thee ! " 

Now upon " Syria's land of roses " the 
Peri stood. Oh! what beauty, what sub- 
limity she found here ; the towering castles, 
untainted shrines and altars sweet and 
pure. It was the hour of sunset, a time 
when every bud and blossom, every living 
thing on earth is hallowed with a flood of 
light so pure, so bright, that the criminal 
drops his head overpowered ; the haughty 
man feels humiliated, the innocent bows his 
head as if awed. But even here the Peri 
felt sad and discouraged, until, glancing 
toward the temple sun, a bright thought 
passed through her- brain, that perhaps 
here, where the sun had shone for thousands ' 
and thousands of years, she might from 
his source find the gem, the gift that would 
unbar for her the crystal gate of heaven. 
And lo ! soon the Peri saw a beautiful 
child at play, chasing blue flies through 
the wild flowers ; and upon his face such 



a sweet innocent look — the expression that 
God has given to the child alone ; a stamp 
that is divine. Near by the boy, a man 
dismounted his steed ; and, after stopping 
to drink from a clear fountain, threw him- 
self to rest upon the ground, showing a 
face so hardened by sin and crime ; so 

"Sullenly fierce, a mixture dire. 
Like thunder clouds of gloom and fire." 

But soon the vesper rang out sweet and 

clear, calling from scores of minarets and 

towers the sad and weary, the gay and 

happy, to evening prayer. Now the boy 

comes forth from the flowers, and kneeling 

on the 

* * * " fragrantiBod," 

with his face turned toward the south, 
" Lisps the eternal name of God." 
Oh, what a sight, what a sweet exam- 
ple ! " No life can be pure in its purpose 
and strong in its strife, and all life not be 
the purer and better thereby." What did 
the man do, when he saw this picture of 
spotlessness ? In heart-broken tones he 
said : 

"There was a time, thou blessed child, 
When, young and happy, pure as thou, 
I looked and prayed like thee; but now — " 

Then he hung his head and wept — yes, 

wept. 

" 'There's a drop,' said the Peri, 
' That, down from the moon, 
Falls, through the withering air of June, 
Upon Egypt's land, of so healing a power, 
So balmy a virtue, that e'en in the hour 
That drop descends, contagion dies, 
And health reanimates earth and skies.' 

Oh! is it not thus, thou man of sin, 
The precious tears of repentance fall ! 
Though foul thy fiery plagues within, 
One heavenly drop hath dispelled them all." 

All through the gates of the beautiful 
city, hymns of joy proclaimed a soul for- 
given ; and soon a light, 

" lovelier far 
Than came from sun or star," 

shone about the Peri ; and well she knew 

it was the bright smile the angel sent 

"To hail that tear, 
Her harbimger of glory near." 

The Peri, enraptured, cried, 

" ' Joy, joy, forever! my task is done; 
The gates are passed, and heaven is won.' " 

CIMC DJIDERC Allof our l ia P ers we sel1 D 7 the 
rlllC r Hi CliO pound at prices ranging from 25 



AND 



ENVELOPES 



cents to $1.00 per pound. Our 
assortment consists of the finest 
French English and American 
papers, and we are constantly 
making additions to our stock. 
On receipt of a three-cent stamp we will send to parties 
unable to visit our store from fifty to seventy-five samples 
of our cheapest as well as our best papers. As nearly 
every kind is to be had in several sizes, ruled and un- 
ruled, it gives an assortment of over two hundred and 
fifty varieties from which to select. With these samples 
we send full information as to sizes and sheets to the 
pound, and envelopes to match. WARD & GAY, whole- 
sale and Retail Stationers, 180 Dev mshire Street, Boston. 



L A.D I E S 

Wishing to have their 

Straw, Chip, Leghorn or Felt 

HATS AND BONNETS 

CLEANSED OR DYED, 

And made into the Latest Styles, will find at 

Guild's B%mmmhmTj f 

535 WASHINGTON STREET, 



Next Dour to Boston Theatre, 



A full line of samples, including the latest novelties, to 
select from. 
4®~Obliging attendants, and hats ready when promised. 



JUST WHAT HAS BEEN TOISD ! 
A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No, 30 Avon Street, Boston. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T It NICE?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Parties served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



100 DOLLARS SAVED 



Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

G. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 
BOSTON . 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 
Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, . . . . . $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar, 40 cents 

Pure Cassia 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger 12 cents lb. 

Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1,00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses, 60 cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



G. D. COBB & BBOTHEBS, 

726 and 728 Washington Street. 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 




First Award at the late M. C. M. Association Fair, 
for the Best Photographic Portraits. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 

353 Washington Streer, BOSTON. 

Personal attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 



We will open the finest and most varied stock of Val- 
entines, Jan. 27. Little girls and boys can make very 
pretty Valentine presents with our embossed pictures 
and paper, at cost of a few cents. 

J. JAY ttOULD, lO Bromfield St., BOSTON. 

ABRAM TPRKJSTCH & CO. 

Importers of 

CHINA, GLASS AND PLATE!) WAKES, 

Wholesale and retail, 

89, 91 and 93 Franklin Street, corner Devonshire, 

BOSTON. 

C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

And dealer in 
FRUIT, PRODUCE, POULTRY, Etc. 

No, 24 North Market Street, BOSTON, 

SWAN «5t ItfEWTOJXT, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

8. B. NEWTON. 

J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 



BRANCH CROCERY STORE, 

BOYTON BLOOK, NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASS, 



Agency for Mine. Demorest's Reliable Patterns. 



WEST NEWTON 

CASH GROCERY. 



We keep the finest goods, and offer them at 

prices as low as any firm in New England, 

in Boston or out. Ask your neighbors 

who trade with us, if our goods 

and prices are not perfectly 

satisfactory. 

AU BURNDAEE ORDERS taken every Tuesday 
and Friday, and delivered same day. 



ROBERTSON & SHERMAN, 

West Newton. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

POEEI&U ^-2<T3D ^.a^EEESICja.aST 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE ACENT FOR 

LITOLFF'S CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 40 Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



Liberal discount made to Teachers. 

Selecting music for Teachers' Seminaries a specialty. 

AUGUSTUS MORGAN, 

m a i m s aw iiif$ 

No. 357 "Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 

Hair Jewelry of all kinds. Pins, Ear-Kings, etc., made 
to order. All kinds of Jewelry repaired. 

Make your own Chromo-Photographs by 
the NEW METHOD of 

PHOTO-ENAMEL PAINTING. 

The difficulties of spotting, etc., overcome. 

Any person can, in two hours, produce, from a photo- 
graph, an ELEGANTLY- PAINTED PORTRAIT, far 
superior and more permanent than by the old method. 
FULL INSTRUCTIONS, and composition enough to do 
two dozen cabinet portraits, sent on receipt of Thirty- 
five one cent stamps. These pictures make handsome 
presents. Address 

HOME ARTS, 158 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

P. S.— Any Publisher desiring to insert the above, one- 
and-a-half inch, in his paper may send me a copy, stating 
price for six months. 



S. WING, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

425 Washington Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and Retail. 

JONES, McDUFFEE & STRATTON, 

Importers of the 

POTTERY AND GLASSWARE 

Of all countries. All grades, from the commonest 
ware to the richest specimens. 

61 to 69 Federal Street, oorner of Franklin, , . BOSTON, 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




PORTRAITS 

In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon atid Ink. 

C. M. LITCHFIELD. W. LORING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Artliti' XfttoUl 

Of Every Description, 

NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




ORIENTAL TEA CO. 



87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburudale, free 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
Imrndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, which he_ 
will sell at the lowest trices. 

4®~ All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

J" _^ HVL E S VIOKERS, 
Auburn St., Auburndale. 



N 



OTMAN 



yvi 



^2Ph olograph^ 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, PARK STREET. 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 

Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

Stationers and flank |ook Manufacturers. 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



8. 8. GAT. 



EDWIN W. GAT. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, 
And 4- Park Street, - - BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



COPYING, 



-A_i_i:f i :l=l:e]:d j^r.ush: 



Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 



I 



LADIES AJTD KEMTLEHEW 

Visiting Boston, either on business or pleasure, should 
not fail to call at 

Learned & C.o.'s Dew and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

413 Washington Street. 

i THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

! Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of " The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls. 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

ISriCHIO 1_iS cfc E^C^TjUj, 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street. - - - BOSTON. 
G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

EEPAIEIHG PE0MPIL7 ATTENDED TO, 



4§jhn% pitoiagrajher^ 



In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



AUBURN STREET, 



AUBURNOALE, MASS. 



C. SARG-EJWT BIRD, 



Patent Medicines, Fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 

HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST, AUBURNDALE, MASS 

-: 1 

FRANK WOOD, 

—STEAM PRINTER— 

No. 352 Washington Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 
AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK & BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 
UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 

wegwwwmb $m nini® 

GEO. S. BRYANT & CO. 
34 Bromfield Street, .... Boston. 



Framing Reasonably and Promptly Done. 



MRS. L. COOK, 




Washington Avenue, AUBURNDALE. 

GRAND EDUCATIONAL EXCURSION TO EUROPE 

Ilf TJETE SUMMER OF 1879. 

Extended Tours thkough Great Britain and 
the most picturesque and interesting Continental 
countries. Special Advantages of an extraordinary 
character. The cheapest and best Excursion ever 
planned. For circulars, giving full particulars, address 
JK. TOTJBJEE, Boston, Mass. 



For Student and all kinds of Lamps, 
Gas Fixtures, etc., call on S. Brotvnell 
& Son, 680 Washington Street, comer 
Beach Street, Boston. 

PIANO TEACHERS. 

The Boston Conservatory Method for the Piano-forte 
has been thoroughly revised, and enlarged 100 new pages, 
thereby making it the most easy, thorough, p-ogressive 
and complete instructor for the piano ever placed in the 
hands of teacher and pupil. The Boston Conservatory 
Method for the Piano-forte has no competitor, so far as 
grading and systematizing each lesson is concerned — a 
fact to which every teacher and pupil who has ever used 
it will testify. We should be glad to have every teacher 
and pupil in'America examine the revised and enlarged 
edition of this favorite Instruction Book, and ascertain 
for themselves whether it is not far superior to any of the 
old favorite methods of 25 years ago. Published with 
either foreign or American fingering, and sent, post free, 
on receipt of $2.50. WHITE, SMITH, & CO., Publishers, 
Boston, Mass. 

A FAVORITE YOUTH'S PAPER. ^ 

The Youth's Companion, of Boston, has steadily grown 
in public favor for more than fifty years, and is now one 
of the most admirably-conducted papers in the country. 
It employs the same writers as the best English and 
American magazines, and no other publication for the 
family furnishes so much entertainment and instruction 
of a superior order for so low a price. Among its con- 
tributors are Dinah Muloch Craik, Miss Tonge, J. T. 
Trowbridge, Louisa M. Alcott, Henry W. Long- 
fellow, James T. Fields, John G. Whittier, and 
nearly fifty of the best story-writers. 

F. H. PLUTA, 

DEALER in 

PROVISIONS, 

COK, AUBURN & LEXINGTON STS, 

FURNITURE 

IMPORTED EXPRESSLY FOR 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S GIFTS. 

USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL. 

Now on Exhibition at Paing's Warerooms, 141 Friend St. 

PRICE-LIST, Wholesale and Retail. 

Bouquet Stands, new designs, $2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 15, 25, SO, to 

$50. 
Bible Stands, useful and ornamental, $4, 5, 8, 1C, 15, 18, 

20 3C to $75. 
Pedestals, French, $7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and $50. 
Jardinieres, of most beautiful designs, entirely new 

styles, $5, 10, 15, 25, to $35. 
Work Tables, very pretty, new patterns, $2, 5, 8, 10, 12, 

15, 20, 25, $40. 
Writing Desks, convenient and elegant, $12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 

35, 50, 60, to $150. 
Camp Chairs, in every style, $2, 3, 3.50, 4, 6, 7.70, 8, 10, to 

$50. 
Folding Chairs, a very useful present, $6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 

18, 25, 30, to $45. 
Music Portfolios, Racks and Screens. $6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 

25, 30, 35 to $75. 
Clocks, French and Americau, $2, 2.50, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9,10, 12, 

15 and $25. 
Bronze Ornaments, French, $2.50, 4, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35, to $65. 
Alabaster, for Mantel Ornaments, from Italy, 50c, $1, 2, 

3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 16, to $35. 
Marqueterie Tables, from Paris, $30, 45, 75, 125, 150 and 

$200. 
Parlor Tables, very rich, $15, 18, 20 25, 35, 45, to $10\ 
Brackets new styles, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, 2, 2.50, 2.75, 3, 4, 5, 

6,7, 8, 9 and $10. 
Fancy Reception and Turkish Chairs $8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 

17, 19, 25, 35, 50, to $85. 
Foot Rests, $5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, $15. 
Blacking Cases, Black Walnut, with Drawers and Slide, 

$5, 5 50 and $6. 
Etageres, most elegant, $28, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, to $125. 
Parlor Cabinets, from Paris, $55, 75, 125, 150, 175, 250 and 

$300. 
Hanging Flower-pot Holders, $'.50 to $15. 
Piano Stools, $5, 6. 7, 8, 10", 12, 15, 20, 30, to $50. 
Card Receivers, $3, 4, 6, 8, to $25. Aquariums, $15. 
Shaving Stands for dressing-rooms, $15, 20, 25, 35, to $50 
Girls' and Boy's Chamber Suites, $22, 25, 28, 30, 35, to $75. 

Works of" art, in figures and has reliefs, from Copen- 
hagen, making a most wonderful disulay, which we are 
now selling at the very lowest importing prices. 



141 Friend Street, «S 48 Canal Street. 

J. S. PAINE. 





JDTJ^ZL IE^IEUM-HxT^. PAOTI." 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINAKY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., FEBRUARY, 1879. 



Number 5. 



CARPETS! 



JOHN E PRAT, SONS * CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

in New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, we can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BOSTON. 




lei of Itetss ." 

There is nothing more pitiful than the 
attempts which some persons make to pile 
up weakness in order to make strength. 

They have got a flimsy material to begin 
with ; they choose a fanciful and much- 
divided pattern, and then burden it with 
strange devices and attempts at ornamen- 
tation. 

We make a great mistake in endeavor- 
ing to create beauty in dress first, and sac- 
rificing truth and fitness and harmony to 
our crude ideas of what this beauty is. 
We never can reach real beauty in this 
way. We must make our dress true, then 
suitable ; then we may proceed to harmony, 
simple or complex, the musical sound or 
the musical symphony, and we shall have 
beauty as the natural outgrowth or evolu- 
tion of what has gone before. 

The beauty of dress, therefore, is both 
external and internal : its external quality 
attracts the eye ; its internal virtue consists 
of what Ruskin calls the "felicitous fulfill- 
ment of function" — that is to say, of its 
goodness and adaptability to its purpose. 

A dress that is true and suitable and har- 
monious must be beautiful. 

We have all seen people of whom their 
clothing was the best part of them ; and it 
is too much the habit of American women 
to talk and act as if their clothes were the 
only important part of their individuality, 
— the only part that was worth attention, 
or that their friends cared for. 

The great feature of the dress of English 
women is their indifference to it. It does 
not absorb their time and attention, as it 
does with us. They go out in clothes suited 
to the purpose, or, if not exactly suited, 
are, at least, not hurt by what they have to 
encounter ; and they do not stop to see or 
ask if they are becoming, — they do not 
seem to think of it, — and, naturally, they 
make those forget it with whom they come 
in contact. 

Their personality is so vivid, so fresh, so 
healthful, that you are impressed by it at 
once, and clothes become a secondary con- 
sideration. 



With American women it is exactly the 
opposite. Wherever they go they become 
distinguished for their elegance of costume. 
But, alas ! dress so often seems to be either 
the best part of them, or that they, them- 
selves, consider it so. Gotten up in style, 
they carry off all the honors ; but what an 
exhausting operation it is ! At what a 
cost of time, of labor, of strength, of 
money, is the result accomplished ; and 
what lassitude, ennui and disgust often 
succeeds. 

The dress, not the woman, made a sensa- 
tion ; and it is the dress, not the woman, 
which is held up for the admiration and 
envy of all other women, in the columns 
of the newspapers. 

******* 

To her dread of not being dressed be- 
comingly, or, rather, being seen in an 
unbecoming dress, the American women 
sacrifices some of her best opportunities. 

She will not do this, until she gets a new 
bonnet ; nor that, until she has made a new 
dress, or made over an old one. She will 
not go anywhere unless she can look like 
"other people " — a foolish ambition, for it 
would be infinitely better for her to look 
like herself; and she will not wear protect- 
ive garments, nor shoes for walking in the 
mud, because they are so ugly ; and so be- 
comes meagre and sallow, or fat and coarse, 
and, when youth is gone, a very unpleasant 
object to look upon. 

******* 

The dress of a pre-Raphaelite is soft and 
clinging, so that it follows the outlines of a 
graceful form, and adapts itself to its mo- 
tions. It is simple in cut, divided into 
very few parts, and the ornamentation, as 
far as possible, is executed upon, and there- 
fore seems to be a part of, the material. 

Hand work, hand embroidery, hand-made 
lace, are adored by the pre-Raphaelites. 

The pre-Raphaelite is always tall and 
slender, with a delicate profile, and serious 
though tender eyes. 

She is the favorite figure in the water- 
color pictures of English artists, and is 
always surrounded by summer foliage ; 
the long, unbroken sweep of her dainty 
gown trailing behind her ; her pretty arm 



2 



LASELL LEAVES. 



raised to tie up a vine or feed a bird ; her 
rippling hair, innocent of tongs, or "rats," 
or additional switches, braided neatly or 
curled naturally, leaving the perfect con- 
tour of the head to crown Nature's most 
perfect work. 



tm I 



fWM 4S.11J 



[Scene at Boston and Albany depot.] 
" To Newton, madam, do you wish to go? 
Which Newton, pray? there's eight of them, you 

know : 
The Centre, where the weary rind a rest? 
Or Newton-toward-the sunset, called the West? 
Newton-w7Ze ? or that newest Newton yet, 
Above the rest, on Newton Highlands set? 
Perhaps the Falls? which one? — your ticket, 

please. 
Oh, Newton ! Madam, that means none of these, 
This is the ti'ain for Newton ; that 's to say, 
Your ticket calls to go the other way. 
"Sir," she replied, "you've Newton on the 

brain ; 
If Newton means not Newton, please explain." 
" Of course, my lady ; that's my business here, 
To do my best to make this mystery clear. 
Of all the various Newtons reached by rail, 
E'en Lincoln's memory has been known to fail : 
There's Auburndale, and that's in Newton, too, 
And Chestnut Hill, the Reservoir and view, — 
You're bound for Newton, not some other spot; 
Newton is Newton — then, again, 'tis not; " 
The train was starting, and I could not wait, 
But left them there, still talking, at the gate. 
— O. in Boston Transript. 



Every Thursday afternoon girls are seen 
wending their way to No. 3, armed with 
measure, thread, thimble, and a number of 
queer-looking contrivances of which they 
alone are privileged to know the name. 
Here they receive instructions in dress- 
making from Miss Burbeck, one of Boston's 
ablest teachers in that department. We 
shall expect to see new dresses worn soon, 
which are cut and fitted in latest style by 
those young maidens who take. 



Pres:dent Lincoln used to tell this story 
of himself. He was riding one day on the 
stage-coach in Illinois, when the driver 
asked him to treat. 

" I never use liquor," was Mr. Lincoln's 
reply, "and I cannot induce others to do 



so, 



." 



" Don't chew, neither? " 

" No, sir." 

" Nor smoke ? " 

"No, sir; I never use tobacco in any 
form." 

"Well," replied the disgusted Jehu, "I 
hain't much opinion of you fellers with no 
small vices. I've allers noticed they make 
it up in big ones." 



Scheol !@i§if* 

" Why, that's all in your eye ! " 
What does Kant say ? We're sorry, but 
we Can't say. 

Do you see the point? 

One of the Seniors seems to need 
" another hour for study." 

All gladly welcomed Professor Bragdon 
back after his brief visit in Williamsport. 

We hope we shall have our annual 
sleigh-ride before the snow entirely disap- 
pears. 

Coasting seems to be a favorite amuse- 
ment with many of the young women just 
now. 

Remember, during these times of slippery 
sidewalks, that "Pride goeth before— a 
fall." 

We are anticipating, with much pleas- 
ure, the series of grand concerts to be 
given shortly by Professor Hills. 

Meetings of the Senior class occur quite 
frequently, just at present ; and each 
" grave and reverend " comes out looking 
so important over something. 

The persons rooming on Llappy Hall are 
favored (?) quite frequently, at 9.15 p. m., 
by passages from Marmion, issuing from 
No. 3. It seems to be quite well appreci- 
ated, too, as loud applause usually follows. 

We heard, the other day, that in one of 
the book-keeping classes an entry was 
made in an example as follows : " To Plow- 
ing with boy." We should like to ask if 
that is not a newly-invented machine for 
plowing? and if so, if it is one of Edison's 
latest inventions ? 

We overheard one of the young women 
remark, the other day, that "she remem- 
bered the Revolution quite distinctly." 
We were not aware we had such an aged 
person among us. We should not blame 
her for not wishing to tell her age. 

We wonder if the Seniors will say, after 
finishing Mental Philosophy, as did another 
collegian of whom we heard the other day. 
We are afraid they will, if they continue 
in the opinion they now seem to have. A 
student who had studied Mental Philoso- 
phy a year before, asked a young man who 
was about to study it, " Have you ever 
taken Mental Philosophy ? " " No." 
" Well, you believe there is such a thing 
as Mental Philosophy, do you ? " " Why, 
yes." " Well, you won't, after you have 
studied Haven." 

Young Miss. — " Oh, say, don't you like 
eels?" Younff Miss No. 2.— "Eels? Oh! 



those are what you fry their hind legs. 
Yes, I think they are splendid." We 
think we must ask Miss Parloa for the 
receipt to cook the hind legs of eels. 

We are pleased to find the girls so well 
versed in the Scriptures, as to be able to 
spell those hard names so correctly. It 
must have been not only a pleasure, but a 
profit, to look over the papers and find so 
few (?) mis-spelled words. We now see, 
to a certain extent, the great good arising 
from Lasell's persistence in having the 
useful branch of spelling taught. 



We are glad to welcome Belle Phelps 
to hwi place again. 

Miss Annie White and Miss Alice Lin- 
scott, class of "18, spent Sunday with us 
not long since. 

We are sorry to lose Miss Bridgeman 
even for a time, and hope that she may be 
better, and return soon. 

We are always glad to see the old girls 
back. Misses Brown and Taylor made us a 
short visit a few days ago. 

A loving wife, on the decease of her 
husband, sent the following thrilling tele- 
gram to a distant friend : " Dear John is 
dead. Loss fully covered by insurance." 

We hear, through correspondents, that 
Minnie Hopkins, after visiting friends for 
some time in Saratoga, has returned to her 
home in the West. We knew she would 
not find another Lasell. 

Something has been missing in the school 
for the past week ; and although our Prin- 
cipal needed rest, yet we all long to see 
him back again — even the Juniors, who 
expect an examination in Political Econ- 
omy on his return. 

We hear that Mrs. H. C Houghton, the 
late Ella Bacon, is rejoicing as mother of a 
beautiful little girl. It will be hard to de- 
cide upon a name, we are afraid, for every 
old girl in the Seminary is ready and will- 
ing to give cup, knife or spoon, if it will 
only be named for her. 

"Experience is the best teacher," some 
one says ; but we wish that one of our 
number had not met with the accident from 
which she is now suffering, even if it may 
give her experience in the matter. It may 
warn the girl, however, not to be careless 
on the ice. Miss Colburn has our hearty 
sympathy, and we hope we shall not miss 
her happy face long from among us. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



We devote a column this week to receipts 
from our notes of the Saturday afternoon 
lecture on cooking, by Miss Parloa, of the 
Boston Cooking School. For those who 
" have no idea how cooking can be taught 
in a boarding school," we will say that it 
presents fewer difficulties than the demon- 
stration in chemistry. 

Here, having as yet no practice-kitchen, 
or lecture-room, with semi-circle stepped 
seats, as is usual, the gymnasium is tem- 
porarily fitted for the purpose. 

On the low platform is the demonstrator's 
table ; at her right, another table for the 
utensils of the day's lesson, with material 
as it is furnished from the market; at her 
left, a cooking-stove of the usual pattern. 

In the public class Miss Parloa does the 
entire work, roasting, frying, stewing, 
freezing, explaining, all going on at once, 
without hurry, fretfulness, or fussiness 
in the demonstrator, or confusion in the 
mind of the thoughtful listner. 

The audience " assists," without diffi- 
culty, in disposing of the feast. 

Miss Parloa answers clearly all questions, 
understands the material and forces with 
which she deals, and believes in causes for 
effects in cooking, as much as in other 
things. "The most hardened are con- 
vinced," as the phrase goes, and, with 
experience, the real value and practicabil- 
ity of the work is apparent. 

There is no reason why cooking and all 
household offices should not be lifted into 
an order of intelligence and skill ; so only 
can the conscientious housemother substi- 
tute organization for personal activity, and 
direct without worry, because the whole 
subject stands, in complete order, first in 
her own mind and practical experience. 

Some say, "We do this at home." We 
think the housekeepers are extremely rare 
who can either execute or direct the prep- 
aration of an elegant dinner, as it is done 
here ; the succession of dishes requiring 
various time all ready at the moment when 
they succeed each other at a table ; the ice- 
creams packed and beaten by her own 
hand ; the sherbet, coffee and sweetmeats 
invariably excellent, as well as the bread, 
rolls, meats and vegetables. 

More than all, Miss Parloa is so strong 
in health and knowledge, that even Mr. 
Dickens could not say, "There is a cooked 
woman at the head of the best American 
tables." 

BAKED CUSK. 

This rule applies to almost any fish. Af- 
ter cleaning, rub a tablespoonful of salt 



over it, and then stuff it. For dressing, 
take three pounded crackers, one table- 
spoon of chopped pork, one teaspoon of 
salt, one of chopped parsley, one-quarter 
teaspoon of pepper, and water enough to 
moisten. Stuff fish, and then skewer it, 
or sew it up. Butter a tin sheet and lay in 
the pan ; lay fish upon it, and scoring it, 
place small strips of pork in the scores ; 
dredge with flour, and cook from three- 
quarters to an hour. Baste frequently with 
the water in the pan ; the last fifteen min- 
utes take one tablespoon of butter, rub 
over the fish, then spread thickly with 
flour. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 

One-half tea-cup of butter, juice of half 
a lemon, yolks of two eggs, cayenne pep- 
per enough to cover a silver five-cent piece, 
one-half cup boiling water, one-half tea- 
spoon salt. Beat butter to a cream ; then 
add yolks of eggs one by one ; then lemon 
juice, and then salt and pepper. Place the 
bowl in which it is mixed in basin of hot 
water ; beat until it thickens ; then add boil- 
ing water; continue beating until thick as 
cream. Now ready to be served. 

MACAROON ICE-CREAM. 

One pint of milk, one small half cup of 
flour, one small cup of sugar, two eggs. 
Put the milk on to boil ; beat flour, sugar 
and eggs together ; stir into boiling milk, 
cook twelve or fifteen minutes. Set away 
to cool ; when cool, add one large quart of 
cream and a very small cup of sugar, two- 
and-a-half-dozen macaroons which have 
been dried in the oven, and then rolled, the 
same as crackers. Freeze the same as any 
ice-cream. 

BREADED SAUSAGES. 

One egg well beaten, three crackers 
rolled fine, from five to eight sausages, fat 
enough to immerse the sausages ; prick 
them, then roll in the egg, and afterward in 
the cracker. Fry ten minutes ; the fat 
should be smoking hot from the center be- 
fore dropping them in. 

CORN DODGERS. 

Three tea-cups Indian meal, one teaspoon 
salt, one tablespoon of sugar. Pour on 
boiling water enough to thicken ; then 
make into small flat cakes, and fry brown. 
If using granulated meal, you must use 
three cups of boiling water; but with the 
ordinary meal, you only need use two and 
one-half cups of water for the three cups 
of meal. 



S, 8. Emkij, m 

Friday evening, Feb. 1, the S. D. Society 
met in the parlor, to celebrate the anniver- 
sary of the dedication of the Forum. The 
customary debate was omitted, and the 
programme varied to suit the occasion. 

The order of exercises was as follows : — 

Calling of the Roll, by the Secretary. 

Opening Hymn. 

Prayer. 

Instrumental Duet,— Overture, from Zampa. 

Misses Hatch and Turner. 

A Welcome to the New Members. 

Miss Hatch. 

Response in Behalf of New Members. 

Miss Bartlett. 

Dedicatory Hymn, by Old Members of Society. 

Presentation of Key to Miss Curtis. 

History of Society. 

Miss Bowen. 

Prophecy. 

Miss Boone. 

Song, — My Own Dear Heart. 

Miss Stedman. 

Recitation, — Knight's Toast. 

Miss Converse. 

After the exercises the new officers for 
the ensuing term of office were elected, as 
follows : — 

President, Miss Cora Flint ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Miss Lizzie Frost ; Secretary, Miss 
Emma Strong; Treasurer, Miss Louie 
Fisher ; Critic, Miss Annie Bartlett ; Usher, 
Miss Rouette Bowen. 

The society then adjourned, with many 
wishes that it might long remain in its 
present prosperous condition. 



Fail-fiMtig, 

Napoleon said that the man who never 
makes a mistake never makes war. Those 
who content themselves with standing 
aloof from revival and temperance work, 
and devote their energies to pointing out 
the mistakes and blunders of those who 
are in the struggle, are making, themselves, 
the greatest of all blunders. Nothing is 
easier than fault-finding. No talent, no 
self-denial, no brains, no character are 
required to set up in the grumbling busi- 
ness. But those who are moved by a gen- 
uine desire to do good have little time for 
murmuring or complaint. — The Advance. 



A little boy refusing to take a pill, his 
mother placed it in a piece of preserved 
pear, and gave it to him. In a few minutes 
she said, " Tommy, have you eaten the 
pear ? " " Yes, mother, all but the seed I '* 






L A S E LL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
IRENE G. SANFORD, '79- 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '80. S. ROUETTE BOWEN, '8i. 

PUBLISHER, 
LUCY CURTIS, '8o. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
NELLIE WHIPPLE. MATTIE RANSOM. 



TERMS. IN ADVANCE. 



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li it 



5S 



"Time and tide wait for no man," says 
the proverb ; the wheel has revolved again, 
another month has come, and our "Leaves" 
must put forth once more. 

But how can they keep their freshness, if 
only the editorial trio contribute to their 
make-up ? 

Let each one hand in her "mite," how- 
ever small. Every little helps; even the 
sea is made of " little drops of water." 
Don't wait, we entreat, to be asked, 
but bring in your contribution speedily 
and cheerfully. Each one ought to be in- 
terested in the amount of readable matter 
the paper contains. 

We should be pleased to receive remem- 
brances of our friends who have departed 
from Lasell. Indeed, we think they ought 
to take an interest, too, and not be so com- 
pletely involved in the " gay world " as to 
forget us entirely. 

Any one taking a peep at our busy life 
here would find a happy-looking assembly, 
with, I think, not a single face to sustain 



the reputation of the " starved boarding- 
school miss " we read so much about in 
those exciting romances of boarding-school 
life. 

We do our share of groaning in approved 
fashion over the 'ologies and 'ometries and 
the knotty passages in Greek and Latin, 
yet sober second thought assures us we 
are not too hardly taxed. 

We get our allowance of play, too, with- 
out which " Jack is a dull boy," or " Gill a 
stupid girl" — a truth in which we put im- 
plicit faith. And some of our work is 
amusing of itself; our dress-making-class 
and cooking-class are a sort of recreation 
to us after hard work over more abstract 
themes. 

We keep a sharp eye to the future. The 
daughters of Lasell, scattered here and 
there over the land, are brightening many 
homes. 

The wise old fogies say the homely ac- 
complishments of cooking and sewing are 
as serviceable in this way, as the more 
showy acquirements. 

Who knows whether we shall not make 
ourselves as cultivated in home missions, as 
a certain seminary in the State has done 
in the foreign field. 



(1 



m 



NOTES FROM A LECTURE, DELIVERED BY MISS 
SANBORN. 

The young ladies of Lasell Seminary 
spent a delightful evening, a short time 
ago, with the "Bachelor Authors," who 
were gracefully introduced to them by 
Miss Kate Sanborn. 

We think that our opinion of Miss San- 
born herself is fully contained in what 
Louise Chandler Moulton says of her : 
"She has a charming presence; a voice 
rich, sweet and exquisitely modulated, and 
the very unusual power of imparting alike 
the utmost expression to pathos and the 
keenest point to an epigram. Nor is her 
matter less excellent than her manner." 

She began her lecture by saying that it 
was a hard subject to manage, as " bachel- 
ors always are ;" bachelors in literature, 
as in life, being inscrutable, and that any 
one of them would furnish works enough 
for a life-time. To play critic to them 
would be an impertinence. 

The catalogue of bachelor authors in- 
cludes Goldsmith, Thompson, Cowley, 
Pope, Lamb, Cowper, Hume, Gibbon, 
Macaulay, Rogers and many others, a large 
share belonging to our own country. 

She told us men could be arranged in 
bundles, and therefore she would try to 



classify these authors, naming some few 
representatives. 

She mentioned first Congreve, "The 
Lady Killer." His last admirer was the 
Duchess of Marlborough, who, on his 
death-bed, had a wax doll made in his 
image, and kept near her during the re- 
mainder of her life. 

Then Swift, who might be called a 
"lady-killer" in a serious way. She then 
brought forward Lamb, whom she styled 
the "self-denying bachelor," and Gray, 
the "old-maidish bachelor;" Voltaire, 
who, on account of his thin face, was often 
called the "wicked mummy. " 

In speaking of Hume, she gave an ex- 
tract from a letter to a friend, in which he 
says, " Woman is the only heavenly body 
whose orbit cannot be determined." 

She told us that most philosophers and 
scientists had been bachelors — "probably 
thought that they could not take time to 
be married." So, also, the best letter- 
writers remained unmarried. 

In speaking of Halleck, she said that 
Bryant paid him a high tribute, by saying, 
on seeing his poem on Burns, " that it was 
the finest one poet ever wrote of another." 

Lastly, she mentioned what she termed 
the " Irresistibles ; " into which class, she 
said, every one was crowding, and " that 
she could do nothing with them, except 
talk about them — woman's last refuge." 

In conclusion she read a poem, entitled, 
" An Old Bachelor's Plea against Matri- 
mony." 

We have tried, and, I am afraid, have 
failed, to give an idea of what Miss San- 
born's lecture was, for one must hear her 
to appreciate it in any degree. We hope 
the time is not far distant when we may 
hear this charming lecturer again, in an- 
other of her lectures on literature. 



" What is this?" asked a proud parent 
of his little boy, producing a " kindergar- 
ten biscuit," shaped like the letter A. 
" A cracker," said young hopeful. "Yes," 
said the father, rather taken down, " I 
know it's a cracker ; but what does it look 
like?" — " A harrow," answered the boy, 
triumphantly, as he grabbed it and made 
for the door, while the father ruminated on 
the difficulties of object teaching. 



Bona fide scene in Prep, class-room. 
Long pause. Prof. — "Well, Mr. S., can 
you favor us with these principal parts ? " 
Mr. S. — " Fleo-fleo,"— rising to the occa- 
sion, — " fleo, skee-tere, bug-i, gnat-urn." 



LASELL LEAVES, 



5 



Gsad lilkifg. 

It is really a grand power to have some- 
thing to say, and to be able to say it. 

Good talkers, like truly good writers, are 
comparatively rare; not but that the num- 
ber is legion of those who think themselves 
possessed of this desirable talent of the 
"gift of gab," but something more than 
words is necessary to make a good talker. 

Dryden hit a large class of the talkers, 
when he said that men were prone "to 
think too little, and talk too much ; " but, 
after all, there is many a mistake made in 
imputing great wisdom to those who, in 
the social circle, sit silently by, looking 
"wondrous wise," as if the conversation 
was too trivial for their notice, but really 
lacking the necessary intelligence to join 
in it. 

The power to interest, please, amuse and 
instruct in conversation, at all times and 
in all places, requires more than the mere 
skillful use of words, more than a rhetorical 
flow of language ; the heart must be in 
union with the mind, as we know "out of 
the abundance of the heart the mouth 
speaketh," and sympathy and good-will are 
ever more welcome than cutting sarcasm, 
however witty it may be. 

That the feelings of others are to be 
considered is no new idea, and Plutarch's 
wise advice, " Do not speak of your hap- 
piness to a man less fortunate than your- 
self," is as valuable now as ever. There 
must be a divining instinct of what may 
best be said, and what best left unsaid. 

Not all whose writings are read with 
admiration can claim the double honor of 
being good talkers, nor vice versa. What 
Johnson tells us of Tom Birch illustrates 
this point ; he says : " He is brisk as a bee 
in conversation ; but no sooner does he 
take a pen in his hand, than it becomes a 
torpedo to him, and benumbs all his facul- 
ties. 

Somethingbesides the faculties that make 
a good writer is necessary to succeed in 
the " mutual game of tongues ; " and, on the 
other hand, how many have there been, of 
whom the world knows nothing, who were 
the center and sun of the circle in which 
they moved, by this very power, but who 
have passed away leaving no record. 

But fame has not been denied to them 
all. We read that far back, in the days of 
Pythagoras, knowledge was power; and he 
who spent thirty years in traveling, on pur- 
pose to collect all that was attainable, used 
the wisdom thus laboriously acquired with 
a charm and grace of speech almost un- 
equaled. 



Among the more modern celebrated con- 
versationalists are those famous French 
dames, Mesdames Recamier, Sevigne and 
DeStael, who drew around them the learned 
and noble of France by their vivacious, 
witty and brilliant converse. 

Scott's talent as a talker is world-re. 
nowned : his conversations are said to have 
resembled his novels ; and they were so 
thoroughly in sympathy with the persons 
in whose company he happened to be, so 
humorous, so imaginative, so graphic, and, 
withal, so generous, that he at once at- 
tracted the love and admiration of all. 

Perhaps Coleridge is one of the best 
examples of a wonderful talker that modern 
times has to show. It is said that his pub- 
lished volumes give but a faint idea of 
those extraordinary monologues which al- 
lured to his side vast numbers of thought- 
ful and admiring listeners. To commit his 
dreamy thoughts to paper was an irksome 
labor that he lacked energy to perform j 
but he needed but a circle of friends to 
loose his powers. We can judge of his 
discourse now, only by the effect it is 
recorded to have possessed upon the hear- 
ers ; but it was most magnificent and 
impressive, and the "Sage of Ilighgate " 
will not soon be forgotten. 



Miss Anna Brackett says of examina- 
tions, as a test of knowledge, that they are 
the unavoidable results of the present 
school organization ; that they are expedi- 
ents, honestly devised, but in how far they 
answer the purpose for which they were 
designed cannot now be determined. The 
result is in the future. The test of educa- 
tion is quality of mind, and not quantity of 
knowledge. " What function has memory in 
education ? " was discussed at some length. 

Disconnected facts are not what we want 
to show true culture. Mental process is 
what we want ; not facts, but relations of 
facts ; what a pupil can do, not what he has 
done. The highest impersonation of soul 
is not a memory. It loses memory and 
gains insight, and we desire to test, not 
memory, but insight. 

Special examinations for entrance to col- 
leges do not give the result of the mental 
development for which we seek, for they 
are often prepared in reference to the hob- 
bies of certain professors, to satisfy indi- 
vidual proclivities or weaknesses ; for they 
are men. We cannot put in figures the 
real growth of a mind. 

A recitation is only an examination. The 
teacher's decision, if she be mistress of 



questions, is far more definite than any per 
cent. 

" Statistical collectors " is the name given 
to the present corps of teachers ; and Miss 
Brackett read a poem, in closing, entitled 
"The Nineteenth Century Teacher." 

'Twas Saturday night, and a teacher sat 

Alone, her task pursuing ; 
She averaged this, and she averaged that, 

Of all that her class were doing. 
She reckoned percentage — so many boys, 

And so many girls, all counted ; 
And marked all the tardy and absentees, 

And to what all the absence amounted. 

Names and residence wrote in full, 

Over many columns and pages ; 
Yankee, Teutonic, African, Celt, 

And averaged all their ages ; 
The date of admission of every one, 

And cases of flagellation; 
And prepared a list of the graduates 

For the coming examination. 

Her weary head sank low on her book, 

And her weary heart still lower ; 
For some of her pupils had little brain, 

And she could not furnish more; 
She slept, she dreamed ; it seemed she died, 

And her spirit went to Hades; 
And they met her there with the question fair : 

" State what the per cent of your grade is?" 

Ages had slowly rolled away, 

Leaving but partial traces ; 
And the teacher's spirit walked one day 

In the old familiar places. 
A mound of fossilized school reports 

Attracted her observation — 
As high as the State House dome, and as wide 

As Boston since annexation. 

She came to the spot where they buried her 
bones, 

And the ground was well built over; 
But laborers, digging, threw out a skull 

Once planted beneath the clover. 
A disciple of Galen, wandering by, 

Paused to look at the diggers, 
And picking the skull up, looked through the 

eye, 
And saw it was lined with figures. 

" Just as I thought," said the young M . D. ; 
" How easy it is to kill 'em " — 
Statistics ossified every fold 
Of cerebrum and cerebellum. 
"It's a great curiosity, sure," said Pat.; 

" By the bones can you tell the creature? " 
"Oh, nothing strange," said the doctor; "that 
Was a nineteenth-century teacher." 



The following choice bit of conversation 
was caught on the fly on Tremont Street, 
the other day : A showily-dressed lady 
was telling a friend about her reasons for 
visiting town, and said : " I do so want to 
attend one of Messrs. Handel and Haydn's 
concerts. I am told they are very fine — 
especially one piece they give called the 
Oratorio." Fact. — Advertiser. 



6 



LASELL LEA V E S. 



Qlipgiap. 

Professor to Theologue — "Mr. K., 
here is your book." R. — " It is not mine, 
sir." Prof. — "I am surprised to find 
you so honest. Why didn't you keep it, 
and say nothing about it ?" R. — "I have 
been studying Moral Philosophy, sir." 

— Ex. 

"Little chunks of wisdom, 
Little grains of chaff, 
Make the tout ensemble 
Of a paragraph." — Ex. 

Inserted for benefit of the Geometry 
class. "What is an axiom?" asked a 
teacher of a Senior in Geometry. " An 
axiom is a — a thing that is plain at the 
first glance, after you stop to think of it 
awhile," was the lucid reply. — Ex. 

Junior, parsing — " Nihil is a noun. Pro- 
fessor. — " What does it come from ? " Stu- 
dent. — "It don't come at all." Prof.- — 
" Does n't it come from nihil ? " Student. 
— " No, Sir. Ex nihilo nihil fit." — Ex. 

Conscientious Greek Professor, remon- 
strating with Sophmore respecting disturb- 
ance in class-room, lays his hand upon 
refractory one's shoulder, and says, "My 
dear friend, the Devil has hold upon you." 

— Ex. 

Student in Political Economy — "In- 
stead of the beneficent system of free com- 
merce, there will arise an angry clashing 
of savage industries and — " Prof. — 
" You may confine yourself to molasses." — 
Ex. (Juniors, take warning, and don't soar 
so high.) — [Ed.] 

" Do editors ever do wrong?" — "No." 
—"What do they do ? "—"They do write, of 
course." — Ex. 

Professor, lecturing on Psychology — 
" All phenomena are sensations. For in- 
stance, that leaf appears green to me. In 
other words, I have a sensation of green- 
ness within me." Of course no harm was 
meant, but still the class would laugh. — Ex. 

" Find out your child's specialty" is the 
urgent advice of a phrenologist. We have 
tried this, and find it not so easy. Some- 
times rock-candy seems to be the favorite ; 
and then, again, there is a marked tendency 
to taffy. — Ex. The "Lasellites' " specialty 
seems (?) to be taffy. — [Ed.] 

For our Subscribers. — To owe is human, 
to pay up, divine. — Ex. So say we all of 
us who have anything to do with a paper. 
-[Ed.] 



in M?uUans* 

For the interest of all who do not know 
the excellencies of those firms advertising 
in our columns, we suggest that, by trading 
with these persons, they will receive both 
attention and satisfaction. 

Prominent among our advertisements is 
that of McCormick & Heald, whose work 
cannot fail to please. 

Ladies desiring to have their hats and 
bonnets made good as new, take them to 
" Guild's Bleachery," where they can be 
cleansed, dyed and made into the latest 
styles. 

The " West Newton Cash Grocery" you 
will find to be a cheap and reliable store to 
trade at. 

All who take that pleasing and instruct- 
ive paper, the Youth's Companion,' will 
gladly recommend it to any who may not 
know its merits. 

Call upon C. J. Littlefield, and see for 
yourself if the stock of fruit, produce, 
poultry, etc., which he advertises, is not 
all it professes to be. 

It is not necessary to commend the grand 
European excursion of Dr. Tourjee for the 
summer of 18*79. The success of his pre- 
vious tour speaks loudly in favor of the 
coming one. 

Let the North British Mercantile Insur- 
ance Company insure your life. 

If you look at the beautiful specimens of 
pottery and glass-ware which Jones, McDuf- 
fee & Stratton display, you will wish to 
go no farther for it. 

Send thirty-five cents to Alfred Sewell, 
158 Clark Street, Chicago, and you will 
receive, in return, full directions as to the 
manner of making your own chromo-pho- 
tographs, by a new and easy method. 
Try, and see if it does n't pay. 

^— ww — .-w. ^ m i l i ■ ■ i i n. in ii . ' iiiji] i. i. i ijg M^^—^— ^M 

Wholesale and Jtetail. 

JONES, McDUFFEE & STRATTON, 

Importers of the 

POTTERY AND GLASS-WARE 

Of all countries. All grades, from the commonest 
"ware to the richest specimens. 

51 to 59 Federal Street, comer of Franklin, . , BOSTON. 



FINE PAPERS 

AND 

ENVELOPES 



' All of our papers we sell by the 
I pound at prices ranging from 25 
cents to §1.00 per pound. Our 
assortment consists of the finest 
French, English and American 
papers, and we are constantly 
making additions to our stock. 
On receipt of a three-cent stamp we will send to parties 
unable to visit our store from fifty to seventy-five samples 
of our cheapest as well as our best papers. As nearly 
every kind is to be had in several sizes, ruled and un- 
ruled, it gives an assortment of over two hundred and 
fifty varieties from which to select. With these samples 
we send full information as to sizes and sheets to the 
pound, and envelopes to match. WARD & GAY, whole- 
sale and Retail Stationers, 180 Devonshire Street, Boston. 



L A^D IE© 

Wishing to have their 

Straw, Chip, Leghorn or Felt 

HATS AND BONNETS 

CLEANSED OR DYED, 

And made into the Latest Styles, will find at 

Guild's Bleaebeffy, 

535 WASHINQTOtf STKEET, 



Next Door to Boston Theatre, 



A full line of samples, including the latest novelties, to 
select from. 
4®"Obliging attendants, and hats ready when promised. 



JffST WHAT BUBBN TJWTED! 
A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No, 30 Avon Street, Boston, 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE-?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Parties served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



100 DOLLARS SAYED 



Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

G. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 
BOSTON .«= 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea, 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 
Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, .... $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar, 40 cents 

Pure Cassia, 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 
Pure Ground Ginger, 12 cents lb- 
Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1.00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses, 60 cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



0. D. GOBB & BROTHERS, 

726 and 728 Washington Street. 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered . 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 1 
prices. 



LASELL LEAVES. 




First Award at the late M. C. M. Association Fair, 
for the Best Photographic Portraits. 

S. W. BAkLEY, 

DEALER IN 

353 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Personal attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 



We will open the finest and most varied stock of Val- 
entines, Jan. 27. Little girls and boys can make very 
pretty Valentine presents with our embossed pictures 
and paper, at cost of a few cents. 

J. J.\Y GOULD, lO Broinfield St., BOSTOIV. 

ABRAM FRKNCH <Sc CO. 
Importers of 

mm® mmmmw® 

CHINA, GLASS AMD PLATED WAKES, 

Wholesale and retail, 

89, 91 and 93 Franklin Street, corner Devonshire, 

BOSTON. 

C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

And dealer in 
FJtVIT, PRODUCE, POULTRY, Etc. 

No. 24 North Market Street BOSTON. 

SWAN <Sc NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faupuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

S. B. NEWTON. 

J. W. DAVIS," 

AUBUBNDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 



BRANCH GROCERY STORE, 

BOTTON BLOCK, NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASS. 



Agency for Mme. Dcmorest's Reliable Patterns. 



WEST NEWTON 

CASH GROCERY. 



We keep the finest goods, and offer thein at 

prices as low as any firm in New England, 

in Boston or out. Ask your neighbors 

who trade with us, if our goods 

and prices are not perfectly 

satisfactory. 

AVBJJRNDAEE ORDERS taken every Tuesday 
and Friday, and delivered same day. 



ROBERTSON & SHERMAN, 

West Newton. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE ACENT FOR 

LITOLFF'S CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 40 "Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on, Application 



Liberal discount made to Teachers. 

Selecting music for Teachers' Seminaries a specialty. 

AUGUSTUS MORGAN, 

■ ▲IB #BJWM!Ia®W f 

No. 357 "Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 

Hair Jewelry of all kinds. Pins, Ear-Rings, etc., made 
to order. All kinds of Jewelry repaired. 

Make your own Chromo-Photographs by 
the NEW METHOD of 

PHOTO-ENAMEL PAINTING. 

The difficulties of spotting, etc., overcome. 

Any person can, in two hours, produce, from a photo- 
graph, an ELEGANTLY-PAINTED PORTRAIT, far 
superior and more permanent than by the old method. 
FULL INSTRUCTIONS, and composition enough to do 
two dozen cabinet portraits, sent on receipt of Thirty- 
five one-cent stamps. These pictures make handsome 
presents. Address 

HOME ARTS, 158 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

P. S. — Any Publisher desiring to insert the above, one- 
and-a-half inch, in his paper may send me a copy, stating 
price for six months. 



S. WIHG, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

425 Washington Street, Boston. 
BOSTON AGENCY 

HS&TB BRITISH and WILE INS, CO, 

OF LONDON AND EDINBURGH. 

J. W. PORTER, Agent, 

No. 27 STATE STREET. 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




PORTRAITS 

In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon and Ink. 

C M. LITCHFIELD. w. L0RING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Artists 1 Material; 

Of Every Description, 

NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 




OMENTAL TEA CO. 



87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE 



The Coffee used at Lasell Semiuary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburndale, freo 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 



JAMES VICKERS, 

RESPECTFULLY announces to the citizens of Au- 
Irarndale and vicinity, that they will find a choice 
Stock of Goods of the very best quality, -which he 
will sell at the lowest prices. 

#5" All orders promptly attended to and delivered free. 
DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 



N 



OTMAN 



yvi 



^2Ph oio0i~aphet^ 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, PARK STREET. 



ST-CT3DXO : 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 

Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

[Stationers and $luk lock Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAT. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, 
And 4 Park Street, - - BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



4§jhxz photographers. 



COPYING, 



:e^ iFi/cxsiEa: 



Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 

INDIES AlVD GEMTLEWES 

"Visiting Boston, either on business or pleasure, should 
not fail to call at 

Learned & Oo.'s new and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

413 Washington Street. 

THE EAGER MAKUFAOTUBHTQ COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Oreralls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers cf "The Ironclad" Paats and Overalls. 
39 K INGSTON ST., BOSTON. 
NIOHOLjS <& ZEI^-ILjI-i, , 
Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLAHS BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

II® ©i m® WMmmm 4k ItafefeeiPS 

REPAIRING; PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 

Patent Medicines, fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 

HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST, AUBURNDALE, MASS 



FRANK WOOD, 

— STEAM PRINTE R — 

No. 352 Washington Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

W. D. LATHROP, 

AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK & BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 
UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 



GEO. S. BRYANT & CO. 
34 Bromfield Street, .... Boston. 



Framing Reasonably and Promptly Done. 



MRS. L. COOK, 




In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



Washington Avenue, AUBURNDALE, 

GRAND EDUCATIONAL EXCURSION TO IlMFE 

IN THE SUMMER OF 1879. 

Extended Touks through Great Britain and 
the most picturesque and interesting Continental 
countries. Special Advantages of an extraordinary 
character. The cheapest and best Excursion ever 
planned. For circulars, giving full particulars, address 
E. TOCRJ1S1S, Boston, Mass. 



For Student and all kinds of Lamps, 
Gas Fixtures, etc., call on S. Brown ell 
& Son, 680 Washington Street, corner 
Beach Street, Boston. 

PIANO TEACHERS. 

The Boston Conservatory Method for the Piano-forte 
has been thoroughly revised, and enlarged 100 new pages, 
thereby making it the most easy, thorough, progressive 
and complete instructor for the piano ever placed in the 
hands of teacher and pupil. The Boston Conservatory 
Method for the Piano-forte has no competitor, so far as 
grading and systematizing each lesson is concerned — a 
fact to which every teacher and pupil who has ever used 
it will testify. We should be glad to have every teacher 
and pupil in America examine the revised and enlarged 
edition of this favorite Instruction Book, and ascertain 
for themselves whether it is not far superior to any of the 
old favorite methods of 25 years ago. Published with 
either foreign or American fingering, and sent, post free, 
on receipt of $2.50. WHITE, SMITH, & CO., Publishers, 
Boston, Mass. 

A FAVORITE YOUTH'S PAPER. 

The Youth's Companion, of Boston, has steadily grown 
in public favor for more than fifty years, and is now one 
of the most admirably-conducted papers in the country. 
It employs the same writers as the best English and 
American magazines, and no other publication for the 
family furnishes so much entertainment and instruction 
of a superior order for so low a price. Among its con- 
tributors are Dinah Muloch Craik, Miss Tonge, J. T. 

TROWBRIDGE, LOUISA M. ALCOTT, HENRY W. LONG- 
FELLOW, James T. Fields, John G. Whittier, and 

nearly fifty of the best story-writers. 

F. H. F>LtJTA, 

DEALER IN 

PKOYISIONS, 

COE, AUBURN & LEXINGTON STS. 

FURNITURE. 

THE WAY BUSINESS IS DONE AT 

Paine's Manufactory, 

141 TEIEND ST. and 48 CANAL ST., 

BOSTON. 



SALESMAN'S ORDERS. 



Date your memorandum book every morning. Sell 
strictly for Cash, at the marked price. Represent goods 
just as you know them to be. 

Enter on your book, and copy on delivery book, name 
of purchaser in full, where, when and how to be sent. 
Name each article, number and price. Hand your book 
to Entry Clerk to copy on to the Blotter, and to make 
bill; all bills to be receipted by Cashier. Have goods 
paid for before delivery, when yon can do so; only con- 
ditionally delivered until paid for. Unless bills are to be 
paid before delivery, request parties with whom we are 
unacquainted to give names to whom they refer. 

All goods to be delivered by Delivery Clerk of the 
Department. 

See that every thing on your book is charged up every 
day on the Blotter. 

See the Delivery Book every morning, that all your 
orders have been delivered promptly. 

Promise only vt hat you can fulfill. 

See that you have credit for all sales actually made by 
you. 

Be courteous to each other. 

Undertake to serve only one party at a time. 

By adopting these rules, and having the best-selected 
assortment of furniture to be found in America, this 
establishment is attracting the attention of customers far 
and near. See their new illustrated price list. 





XDTJ^Sl IF'IEJVLIIXr^. PAOTI. 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., MARCH, 1879. 



Number 6. 



CARPETS! 

JOHN H. PRAY, SONS 4 CO 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

in New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rnp, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as Ave do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, we can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BOSTON. 



A Loat tail. 

I do not know where I lost it, 
For it slipped from a broken string, 

And far and away from my sight to-day 
It lies, a neglected thing. 

Or worse, since it may be another 

Is wearing my pearl of price, 
And the gem that was mine, with its lucent shine, 

May be set in some strange device. 

I do not know when I lost it; 

It was just as the dawning burst 
Through-the crystalline bars of the lingering stars, 

With sorrow I missed it first — 

Perhaps in an opaline twilight, 

Perhaps when the moonbeams lay 
With their delicate quiver o'er field and river, 

And night was fairer than day. 

I never dreamed half how precious 

Was my beautiful pearl to me, 
Till the grief of its loss, like an aching cross, 

I bore over land and sea. 

You marvel ! You do not divine it? 

I have lost what I could not lend ; 
What I'll mourn while I live, for no art can give 

To my heart the lost heart of my friend. 

[By Maugauet E. Sangstek, in the Sunday 
Magazine."] 



A Yelcg Mm the City, 

Boston, Feb. 27. 
The Autocrat of the Breakfast-table re- 
marks, on one occasion : " The axis of the 
earth sticks out visibly through the center 
of each and every town or city." How- 
ever true it may be of other locations, the 
inhabitants of this Modern Athens do not 
entertain the faintest doubt concerning the 
revolution of our sphere about them. 

''Boston! where folks believe in just one thing — 
One unit; and that's why they're Unitarians — 
Boston's the unit in their 'rethmetics." 

Seldom has the "axis" been more 
plainly visible in this city than during the 
present season. Everyone, from the aristo- 
crat of Beacon Hill to the vendor of the 
street, seems to appreciate more than 
usual the value of being Boston-bred ; 
even the news-boy cries his paper with 
dignity ; and the very atmosphere seems 
laden with artistic and literary sugges- 
tions. 

Oratorical entertainment can be pro- 
cured in any style desired, from the chat- 
tering of the talkative parrot in Horticul- 



tural Hall, to the profound eloquence of 
our Monday lecturer at Tremont Temple ; 
while elocutionary skill is displayed in all 
its departments, Dundreary as well as Mac- 
beth. 

Devotees of Euterpe have enjoyed the 
rare privilege of weeping over the griefs 
of Lucia or Mignon, as depicted by Gers- 
ter, Kellogg and Cary. Why ! the entire 
list of adjectives at the command of Bos- 
ton reporters has been exhausted in each 
day's account of the evening performance 
of these musical artists ! 

In the way of art exhibitions we have 
been favored of late. The Boston Art 
Club opened its usual exhibit at the Club 
Rooms, where the public were permitted to 
examine the summer work of the members. 

Some extremely good works were dis- 
played, the collection being enriched by 
two loaned pictures, a large scene by Cour- 
bet, and a small Turner. 

We have had an opportunity, too, of 
studying some of the vague " symphonies " 
.of Whistler, who just now occupies a 
prominent position in the art world. 

His arrangements possess the rare merit 
of looking as well when upside down, as 
when in their natural position. What 
more can one say ? 

The pride of the Bostonian's heart of 
late was the Loan Exhibition, which was 
said to have surpassed, in some respects, 
that of which New York was so vain. 

The inevitable collection of " Keramics " 
occupied an important position, and really 
presented attractions even to those not 
afflicted with the "kraze." To indiviuals 
who were able to preserve their mental 
equilibrium in the presence of such articles, 
there was an indescribable delight in lis- 
tening to the ecstacies of bHc-abrac col- 
lectors over those bits of Wedgewood, 
French porcelains, Chinese relics and Jap- 
anese antiques. 

There was an interesting exhibit of old 
silver and jewelry, which rewarded one 
for study ; outlandish tankards, goblets, 
spoons, castors, Norwegian drinking-cups ; 
John Alden's mustard-pot; old diamond 
shoe-buckles, historic watches and fans; 
oddly set 2,-ems of everv kind. 

Embroideries of every description, and 



LASELL LEAVES. 



some capable of no description, filled an 
entire room ; the usual " applied " dragons 
and cupids ; flowers like nothing on the 
earth beneath, or in the waters under the 
earth; gorgeous decorations in scarlet and 
gold ; and some unmistakable blossoms 
finely executed on screens and panels. 
So on, ad infinitum — and that was the Loan 
Exhibition. 

Of course you have heard of the " Carni- 
val 1 " — of the brilliant success achieved by 
the ladies of Boston in their endeavor to 
increase the Old South Fund. On the four 
successive evenings Music Ilall was filled 
with a delighted throng, who were untiring 
in their praises of the novel entertainment 
provided ; processions representing noted 
authors and their famous characters, all in 
admirably designed costumes ; beautiful 
tableaux ; charming minuets of " ye olden 
time ; " and the wonderful fan drill, over 
which Bostonians rave yet. 

A gay carnival it was for our staid city ; 
and, best of all, was the financial success, 
thousands of dollars being added to the 
sum already obtained for the preservation 
of the historic church. 

All honor to good old Boston, whose 
efforts are put forth in so praiseworthy a 
cause ! Honor to the city who opens wide 
her doors to literary and artistic excellence, 
and who strives to raise amongst us the 
standard of moral and mental culture. 



Slf. 

" Snow, Snow, beautiful Snow ! " 

New kind of matches have been intro- 
duced. Fire-proof, now ! 

Letteks from the old girls are coming in' 
quite rapidly. 

The " original Old Prob. " has taken up 
his abode among us. 

Can any one tell the number of weeks, or 
even days, before the Fast vacation ? 

By the programmes now ready, we have 
the promise of a great treat before us at 
the elocution entertainment, which takes 
place on Tuesday evening, March 18. 

We heard the other day of a man who 
spelled " coffee " in rather a new-fashioned 
way. It was after this style: "kaugh- 
phy." We would recommend the above- 
named to the tender mercies of Miss G. 

We heard one young lady remark of 
another, the other day, "that some people 
have such an acute sense of hearing, that 
even if a fly was to sharpen its bill one 
thousand miles away, it would have to 
stop operations. 



The Kindergarten department has opened 
under very favorable auspices, there being 
a goodly number of pupils in attendance. 

If you wish for any "light reading," 
just call at No. 6. New stock of the 
latest novels received only a week or two 
since. 



We are glad to welcome Mrs. Bragdon 
and the " little ones " back ; we can hardly 
tell which was most missed. 

We deeply sympathize with one of our 
former sisters, Miss Frost, in the loss of 
her brother. 

We tremble for one of our teachers, for 
we hear she has another new picture of a 
certain young gentleman in her room. 
How lonely it will be without her ! 

Letters from the old girls are being re- 
ceived, and once in a while we girls hear a 
little from each to encourage and help us. 
How faithfully we shall keep up this pleas- 
ant habit when we are through, and have 
nothing (?) to do but write letters ! 

From reports we soon expect to have 
several columns in our paper filled with ac- 
counts of the brilliant marriages of former 
students. Why, Miss — but we must not 
mention names, " for there is many a slip 
between cup and lip " — But the class of 
"18 had better be watching. 

What shall we do without Miss Turner 
for a few days ? Some one will have to be 
unusually merry to fill her place. We 
hope she will enjoy the trip, and return 
looking as well as when she went away. 
How we do envy her, for a trip to New 
York is not disagreeable to any girl, I 
think ; and certainly not when a " big 
brother" is waiting to receive you. 

We are all very glad to see Miss Col- 
burn up again, and hope she will soon be 
able to walk without a support. 

We welcome the new teacher among us ; 
the "kindergarten" seems to be flourish- 
ing under her care. We shall have to be 
careful, and not get mixed on the Carpen- 
ter question, however. 

Another of our students is called to 
mourn the death of a cousin. She has our 
warmest sympathy in her sorrow. 

We were very glad to see the familiar 
faces of Misses Alice Linscott and Katie 
Miller among us again, and were glad to 
have them, by reading and singing, add so 
much to our evening's programme. 



The first which we examine is the Mor 
ris Avalore. The article which we partic- 
ularly notice is " Newspaper Poetry, ,r 
well written and amusing. Shorter con- 
tributions preserve the variety and spici- 
ness of the paper. 

We are glad to exchange with the Cam- 
pus. We like the style of the paper very 
much. The " Sword of Damocles," an 
historical sketch, is instructive as well as 
interesting. 

The Vidette for Februai-y contains but 
one literary article ; this, however, is long, 
and worth reading. 

We are always glad to welcome stran- 
gers. The first number of the Newton 
Gazette, a semi-monthly, is before us as we 
write, and we like it very much. We 
should say that it bids fair to create quite 
a sensation in the college world. " The 
Rhine and its Legends " is interesting, as 
are the locals and editorial. 



-b ypaioi oje is. 

COOKING AND CUTTING AT A YOUNG LADIES' 

SEMINARY. 

I took a trip to Massachusetts, the other 
day, and visited a young ladies' seminary 
of high character, at Auburndale, ten 
miles from Boston, where the experiment 
was just about being tried of teaching the 
young ladies the principles of cooking, 
and of cutting their own garments. 

There is no effort to adopt the plan of 
Wellesley College, which is only five 
miles from Auburndale, and make the 
pupils and teachers do regular and specified 
kitchen duty ; that is found to be imprac- 
ticable for teachers and scholars. It unfits 
them for continuous mental work ; it eats 
into their little leisure, and distracts 
thought, time and attention at seasons 
when they can be ill-spared. But classes 
for the acquisition of a knowledge of the 
principles upon which good cooking and 
correct dressing are based, have been 
formed with what promise to be excellent 
results ; and if they do not know practi- 
cally how to make fancy confectionery, 
they will see what are the essential condi- 
tions for good roasting, baking, boiling 
and stewing. In the same way, if they 
do not, as they will not, learn how to drape 
a la Worth, they will have been taught 
how to shape and cut to the form, and how 
to adapt the principles of correct form to 
any garment or article of dress in the 
future. I was sorry I could not stay to 
see the first lesson of this description ever 
given in a young ladies' school of high 



LA SELL LEA V E S. 



class, or of any class ; for the lessons in 
sewing given in some of the mission 
schools of Boston and New York are of a 
different description altogether. Auburn- 
dale is a continuation of West Newton, 
one of the loveliest suburbs of Boston, and 
the school is the one founded by a Mr. 
Lasell, one of a family of famous teachers 
in northern New York. It is the bright- 
est, most home-like and progressive board- 
ing-school I ever saw. — Baltimore Ameri- 
can, Feb. 8, 1819. (Mrs. Croly.) 

"Wlai in 111© Wili Wiv/is iiyligF 

Please give me an easy one. I was 
never good at guessing conundrums ; and, 
as I do not understand the wave language, 
am quite sure that I cannot answer this one, 
unless you are willing to wait until I can 
procure a teacher and take lessons. 

On second thought, I think best to say, 
"Give it up" without that condition; for 
I am afraid that no one but the natives can 
give such instruction ; and as swimming is 
not one of my accomplishments, I prefer to 
keep my distance from the briny deep. 

Besides, I see no reason why you should 
be so inquisitive ! Their conversation may 
be of a private nature ; and it certainly 
would not be very polite to report what the 
ladies say to their husbands when they 
come home late at night, or disclose the 
small talk which passes between some 
wave's brother and some other wave's sis- 
ter. Then, too, how do you know that 
they are not saying something about us? 
Of course, as long as it remains uncertain, 
we may imagine them to be speaking of us 
in the highest terms ; but if we should hap- 
pen to overhear — well, you may have heard 
the statement that listeners seldom hear any 
thing very complimentary to themselves. 

So, on the whole, do you not think it is 
best for us to be content, without knowing 
what they say? — following the example of 
the old lady, who, boasting of her obedient 
cat, told it to go out of the room ; where- 
upon the model feline made all haste to get 
under the bed. " Very well," said the old 
lady, "go under the bed ; I will be minded." 

But, now, here is a secret. You know 
they say, "actions speak louder than words. " 
Do you understand? Of course you do; 
so, if you are willing, I will tell you some 
of the things these same waves do ; and, 
perhaps, that may be as interesting as their 
conversation would be. 

In the first place, you must know that 
they are dreadfully irregular in their habits. 
They seem to have no order about any- 
thing, and their house-keeping must be 



shocking; for sometimes they sleep all 
day: watch as long as you may, you can't 
see one of them up and doing — at the very 
times, too, when we folks on land are the 
busiest ; it is very exasperating to see them 
so lazy, I assure you. 

Again, they will be up all night, danc- 
ing, singing and holding high carnival, and 
then it doesen't make one bit of difference 
in the morning ; they will be as gay as 
ever, and not seem at all tired, except 
sometimes when they have been unusually 
dissipated ; but then, I think it is because 
they are ashamed, and don't want people to 
know what dreadful things they have been 
doing. 

But you should see them in the morning, 
when the mothers all take their children 
up in their arms, kiss them, and send them 
off to play. 

Then how the little things dance away ; 
how they play tag and hide-and-seek ; 
how they laugh, and stop every now and 
then to kiss each other. 

At last they come up to the shore, and 
there play with the shining sands and pink 
shells, talking ever so quickly to them- 
selves, or dance over the rocks, and laugh 
so loud that they frighten themselves into 
standing still. 

By and by it is time to go home ; and 
away they go, now fast, now slow, leaving 
some of their pretty playthings on the 
shore, and taking away some that they 
found there. 

At night the babies are rocked to sleep ; 
their dainty little white night-caps are put 
on, and the first thing you know they are 
whisked off to bed, and you don't see them 
at all. But what do you see ? Why, on 
moonlight evenings there are the young 
folks walking or dancing on the shore, and 
one's eyes are dazzled by the foam which 
shimmers like rare, fleecy lace, and sparkles 
like diamonds. It is perfectly enchanting. 

You see, I think they are aware that 
they look well by moonlight, for they walk 
low and talk in just the lowest murmur, so 
that if you are not careful, you will be 
asleep in three minutes. But, alas ! they 
are not always so quiet and gentle — no, in- 
deed ! On the beach where the children 
played great angry giants march up, and 
seem to demand something of the land, or 
dash themselves against the rocks with 
such fury that they almost give way ; and 
farther on, where, a while ago, we saw a 
scene of peace and beauty, the strong 
waves are destroying the frail work of 
man's hands. But let us not look again; 
"Man's control stops with the land," and 



that is enough. Do you wish we could go 
below the surface, and see what they are 
doing in their palaces of coral and pearl ? 
No ? I agree with you, for they are un- 
trustworthy ; and if we can't understand 
what they say, we can content ourselves 
with the words of the doll dress-maker, 
" We know their tricks and their ways." 

For nearly a week before this memo- 
rable day, great preparations were being 
made for a fancy-dress party ; and consid- 
ering the difficulties, many appropriate cos- 
tnmes were made. 

At an early hour of that evening, Misses 
West, C. Kendig, Frost and Thomson re- 
ceived the guests in the parlors, and sus- 
tained their parts as hostesses throughout 
the evening. The programme consisted of 
readings, by Misses McKeown and Linscott ; 
recitations of German and French poems, 
by Misses Bailey and Garland ; a piano 
solo by Miss Turner ; a vocal solo by Miss 
Miller, and a vocal duet by Misses Stedman 
and Bowen. 

Perhaps the most conspicuous of all the 
guests was " Topsy," who persisted in an- 
noying every one. " Bo-peep " was search- 
ing all the evening for her sheep, but was 
obliged to return home without them. 
"Milkmaids," "fairies," "ladies of the 
period," " Pocahontas," " peasant girls," 
"nuns," "Spanish ladies," and last, but 
not least, the " cook," who during the 
evening was very much terrified by Topsy, 
were present, and though the costumes 
were well chosen, we will not attempt to 
describe them. 



We girls, with a goodly number of out- 
siders, gathered in the Chapel the other 
evening to hear the first of the course of 
classical concerts which Profesor Hills has 
been arranging. He was assisted by Misses 
Palmer and Washburn and Mr. Hayden. 

The first piece was a grand concerto, 
which had never before been rendered in 
America. It certainly met our greatest 
expectations. Professor Hills at one grand 
piano, accompanied by Misses Palmer and 
Washburn at another, made the hall re-echo 
with a kind of music it has not heard for a 
long time. 

Mr. Hayden's fine singing must have 
been highly appreciated, also, for his en- 
cores were frequent, and the length of the 
applause was something wonderful. We 
shall look forward with pleasure to the 
next concert, which will not occur until the 
first of next term. 



4 



LASELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

— BY THE — 

Lasell Publishing Association 

— OF — 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



EDITOR, 
IRENE G. SANFORD, ' 7 g. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS, 
ANNIE KENDIG, '8o. S. ROUETTE BOWEN, '8r. 



PUBLISHER, 
LUCY CURTIS, '8o. 



ASSISTANT PUBLISHERS, 
NELLIE WHIPPLE. MATTIE RANSOM. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 



One Copy, one year (including postage), 
Single Numbers, - 



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As we stop for a moment to reflect, it 
hardly seems possible that another term has 
nearly drawn to a close, and that we, in 
our turn, must vacate the editorial chair. 

We hope our successors may reap as 
much benefit from the work as we have 
done ; and where we have failed to inter- 
est, we beg to be judged leniently. 

Many of our companions shrink from 
this position of trust and responsibility. 
They say it is too much care, and too dis- 
agreeable, to feel one's self open to possi- 
ble censure. Well, it is somewhat difficult. 
We felt timid, also ; but duty resolutely 
done always brings much pleasure. Bat- 
tling with obstacles, and all good hard 
work may become pleasant. 

And why should we not derive some 
pleasure from everything ? 

Many people go through the world quite 
starved for enjoyment, simply because 
they fail to pick up the joys that lie in 
their way. 

We can see fine water colors and copies 



of the choicest paintings in the store win- 
dows ; we can pass the houses of the rich, 
and see, through the lace-draped windows, 
beautiful statuary and vases. They are 
ours, and we can enjoy them without care 
or money — for possession is not always 
the highest pleasure. 

The birds also sing all the year through. 
If it is not the robin and other birds of 
spring, it is the sparrows that are chirping 
to us, and bidding us to be up and about 
our work, as busy as are they. 

The flower-shops are filled with roses, 
violets, pinks and other varieties of choice 
blossoms. Why should we not look at 
them and delight in their beauty, as if they 
were in our own garden ? In this world 
of ours — God's world — there are myriads 
of blessings and pleasures that we might 
enjoy if we would only go through it with 
our eyes open. And doubly sad will it be 
if we fail, not only to get our eyes open to 
the joys of this world, but also to those 
of the next. 

It is now the first of spring, and we 
shall not have to wait so very long before 
we can watch the buds on the trees grow 
and swell from day to day, and at last 
burst forth in all their verdancy ; and see 
the crocuses and early violets peeping 
forth and bidding us a glad "good-morn- 
ing" after their long sleep. 

But we must lay aside our rambling pen. 
Another will take it up, we trust, with 
freshness and ability. And with this hope, 
we make our parting btfw and retire. 



4a I: 



The following is the exact copy of a sign 
hung out in a village in Wiltshire, Eng- 
land : — 

" Matty Miller, barber, perri-wig maker, 
surjon, parish clerke, school-master, black- 
smith. 

" Shave for a penne, cuts for two penc," 
and oyled and powdered into the bargain. 
Young Lady's gintlemen also taught there 
grammar, langwage in the neetest manner, 
and great care taken to there morils and 
spellin. Also salme singer and horse 
shoein by the rele maker. Likwise makes 
an mends all sorts of butes and shues, 
teaches the hubby and juse harp, cuts corn, 
bledes and blisters on the lowest terms. 

"Cowtillions and dances taut at home and 
abroad. Also deels holesale retale per- 
fumery in all its branches. Sells all sorts 
of stashunary wair together with blackin 
ball, red herrin, gingerbread and coles, 
scrubbin brushes, treycle, mouse traps and 



other sweet-meats. Likewise Godfrey's 
cordial, rutes, potatoes, sasages and other 
garden stuff. 

"N. B. I teaches joggrafy, and them out- 
landish kind of things. A bawl on Wed- 
nesday and Friday, all performed (God 
willing) by me." 



fit Bill to Bit. 

The true girl has to be sought for. She 
does not parade herself as show goods. 
She is not fashionable. Generally, she is 
not rich. But, oh ! what a heart she has 
when you find her! So large and pure 
and womanly. When you see it, you won- 
der if these showy things outside were 
women. If you gain her love, your two 
thousand are millions. She'll not ask you 
for a carriage, or a first-class house. She'll 
wear simple dresses, and turn them when 
necessary, with no vulgar parvenu to 
frown upon her economy. She'll keep 
everything neat and nice in your sky par- 
lor, and give you such a welcome when 
you come home, that you'll think your 
parlor higher than ever. She'll entertain 
your friends on a dollar, and astonish you 
with the thought how little happiness 
depends on money. She'll make you love 
home (if you don't, you're a brute), and 
teach you how to pity, while you scorn a 
poor fashionable society that thinks itself 
rich, and vainly tries to think itself happy. 

Now, do not, I pray you, say any more, 
" I can't afford to marry." Go, find the 
true woman, and you can. Throw away 
that cigar, burn up that switch cane, be 
sensible yourself, and seek your wife in a 
sensible way. — Oliver Wendell Holmes. 



In the still air the music lies unheard ; 
In the rough marble beauty hides unseen ; 
To make the music and the beauty needs 
The master's touch, the sculptor's chisel keen. 
Grent Master, touch us with Thy skillful hand; 
Let not the music that is in us die ! 
Great Sculptor, hew and polish us; nor let, 
Hidden and lost, Thy form within us lie! 
Spare not the stroke! do with us as Thou wilt! 
Let there be naught unfinished, broken, marred; 
Complete Thy purpose, that we may become 
Thy perfect image, Thou our God and Lord ! 

— Bonar. 



When Longfellow was presented to Mr. 
Longworth, of Cincinnati, the latter re- 
marked : " There is no great difference in 
our names." "Yes," replied Mr. Long- 
fellow, "but 'worth' makes the man, the 
want of it the ' fellow.' " 



LA SELL LEA V E S. 



fiUi§kf' J § IMas. 

The "sweet singers of Israel" and 
"players upon instruments," will do well 
to get their music at the store of Arthur 
Schmidt, who deals in all kinds of music, 
foreign and American, classical and mod- 
ern. 

Examine the fine display of crockery, 
china, etc., exhibited by Abram French 
& Co. It cannot fail to please. 

When the next season for valentines 
arrives, remember to patronize J. Jay 
Gould. 

Ladies wishing the services of a good 
dress-maker, we think will find satisfaction 
in employing Mrs. Linda Cook, of Auburn- 
dale. 

Girls, send your name and address for 
the " Ladies Hand-Book of Needle- Work ;" 
it will be an ornament to your work-basket. 

The patrons of James Vicker will be 
interested to know of his removal to a 
large, commodious store in the new block 
" down town." 

A nice assortment of stationery is always 
.found at the well-known store of Ward & 
Gay, on Devonshire Street. 

A new barometer hangs in the front hall, 
where all may gaze upon it who wish, and 
tell exactly what kind of weather we shall 
have during the day,- — provided they un- 
derstand how, — whether there will be 
snow enough for sleighing, or ice enough 
for skating, or, what is better still, whether 
the daily walk will have to be taken. 

Old Probability prophesied for March 4th 
warm weather and thaw ; for the 5th clear 
and thaw; for the 6th clear and frosty; 
for the '7th rain ; for the 8th clear and high 
winds ; for the 9th warm and thaw ; for 
the 10th cloudy — some rain. 



An old lady from the South, said she 
never could imagine where all the Smiths 
came from, until she saw in a New Eng- 
land town a large sign, "Smith's Manu- 
facturing Company." — Ex. 

Prof, in French to Soph., who has been 
brought up against the word " incompre- 
hensible : " — "Well, well, what is incom- 
prehensible?" Soph. — "The rest of the 
sentence. "• — Ex. 

A man froze the bottom of his feet, lately, 
and as he held them up to the stove, he re- 
marked, " Two soles, with but a single thaw 
-out." 



A gentleman recently about to pay his 
doctor's bill, said : " Well, doctor, as my 
little boy gave the measles to all my neigh- 
bors' children, and as they were attended 
by you, I think you can afford, at the very 
least, to deduct ten per cent from the 
amount of my bill for the increase of busi- 
ness we gave you." 

A school-boy being asked by his teacher 
how he should flog him, replied: "If you 
please, sir, I should like to have it on the 
style of penmanship — the heavy strokes 
upward, and the downward ones very light." 

How is it that a hot furnace is always 
coaled ? 

" There," said the shopman, pointing to 
a beautiful epergne, " there's a fine center- 
piece." "Cent apiece," gasped old Mrs. 
Bagster, who stood near; "cent apiece! 
you may wrap up two of them for me, if 
you please, Mr. Smith ; " adding, sotto voce, 
"I'd no idee them things was so cheap." 

• 

A Junior being catechised as to the 
nature of an oxide, murmured that he 
didn't see how an ox-hide should differ 
materially from a cow-hide. — Ex. 

Why was Noah never hungry? Be- 
cause he had Ham with him. — Volante. 



A Senslll© Wond fm lie @£ris. 

A Girl who makes herself too cheap is 
one to be avoided. No young man, not 
even the worst, excepting for a base pur- 
pose, wants anything to do with a cheap 
young lady. For a wife, none but a fool 
or rascal will approach such a woman. 
Cheap jewelry nobody will touch if he can 
get any better. Cheap girls are nothing 
but the refuse ; and the young men know 
it, and they will look in every other direc- 
tion for a life-long friend and companion, 
before they will give a glance at the pinch- 
beck stuff that tinkles at every turn for 
fascinating the " eye of any that will look." 
You think it quite the correct thing to talk 
loudly and coarsely ; to be boisterous and 
hoydenish in all public places ; to make 
yourself so bold and forward and common- 
place everywhere, that people wonder if 
you ever had a mother, or home, or any- 
thing to do. So be it. You will probably 
be taken for what you are worth ; and one of 
these years, if you do not make worse than 
a shipwreck of yourself, you will begin to 
wonder where the charms are that once you 
thought yourself possessed of, and what 
evil spirit so befooled you. Go on ; but 
remember, cheap girls attract nobody but 
fools and rascals. — Boston Transcript. 



Um Man iMtat 

It is harrowing to one's feelings to hear 
the insane manner in which raving poets 
write, have written, and probably will 
write, entirely regardless of facts, on the 
subject of spring. For my part, I wish 
they would show a little more regard for 
the truth, and state things as they really 
are, instead of trying to make us poor 
mortals believe that which is not, is. 

Don't talk to me about the bliss of watch- 
ing "mother earth weave her mantle of 
green," or of seeing trees put forth their 
buds and leaves, etc., etc. I do not dis- 
pute the truth of such statements ; indeed, 
I should think it might be quite a delight- 
ful occupation, provided one did not have 
to don waterproof and rubbers, wade 
through mud several inches deep, and go 
peering out from under an umbrella, in 
order to watch the above-mentioned opera- 
tions. 

"Gentle?" Well, perhaps it is, when 
the wind howls all night, the rain pours all 
day, the house is gloomy, every one has 
the blues, and is so cross one doesn't dare 
address a fellow- creature on any subject, 
for fear of being annihilated by a glance 
of contempt ; but if it is gentle, I should 
be pleased to have some one give me an 
an example of fierceness. 

Some deluded persons say it is an inter- 
esting and amusing occupation to watch the 
robins when they first come, and are build- 
ing their houses for the summer ; but I 
don't see how any one can find any amuse- 
ment in looking at -the poor little half- 
starved things, as they go hopping about 
in such a forlorn way, standing first on 
one foot, and then on the other, looking as 
if they meditated a return to warmer 
climes. It strikes me that they are foolish 
to come here, any way. Of course, they 
have their own opinion on the subject, and 
are at liberty to do as they please ; but it 
seems to me if I were in a comfortable 
place I should stay there, and not go hop- 
ping off into the midst of snow and cold, 
and troubling myself to hunt up materials 
to make a house. 

" Gome, gentle spring ! " Now what is 
the use of repeating that exhortation ? We 
might shriek come to the fickle creature till 
we were hoarse, and it would do no manner 
of good. Perhaps she did consent to let 
us enjoy a dash of " ethereal mildness " for 
one day; but she takes her revenge by 
making the wind colder, and the rain more 
rainy, the day after. 

Truly, now is the season " of our discon- 
tent," for our minds are much agitated with 



6 



LASELL LEAVES. 



the subject on which Mrs. Caudle waxes so 
eloquent — that of " spring clothes." You 
think, perhaps, it is so cold, that you will 
postpone the purchase of your spring gar- 
ments ; but in a few days the warm weather 
sets in, and finds you unprepared to receive 
it. Again, you take warning from your 
former experience, and get your spring 
wardrobe in good season ; but you wait in 
vain for a mild day. At last you become 
desperate, array yourself in your new 
attire, and experience the sensation of 
being regarded as a second edition of Rip 
Van Winkle, who fell asleep the summer 
before. And now approaches the time of 
house-cleansing. As soon as a few pleas- 
ant days appear, every good housekeeper 
begins to show symptoms of that frightful 
disease, and is frequently heard to say that 
the house must be put in order. The zeal 
with which they go to work is edifying in 
the extreme ; but it is a mystery to me 
why, to produce order, it is first necessary 
to produce such perfect chaos. Why is it 
not just as well not to turn everything up- 
side-down before beginning ? They will 
listen to no such logic, however, and it is 
something to terrify the uninitiated — the 
appearance which they present, as, with 
towels on their heads, and brooms in their 
hands, they stalk through rooms in which 
there is a prevalent odor of soap and water. 
It is not best to enter the house with too 
much freedom at these times, for you will 
never be able to find a chair ; and it is 
most humiliating to stand in the presence 
of these women as they dash at imaginary 
specks of dirt, looking at you, meanwhile, 
as if you were a disturber of the public 
peace, because you don't arm yourself with 
a broom, and make yourself hideous by 
wrapping a towel around your head. Your 
position finally becomes unbearable, and 
you endeavor to flee to some other apart- 
ment, but are greeted with a request not 
to go in there and upset everything ; so 
you again seek refuge out of doors, where 
you wander about in a most uncomfortable 
frame, not only of mind, but of body, for 
you begin to experience sensations of hun- 
ger ; but it seems to be the general opinion 
that one shouldn't think of eating in house- 
cleaning time. Words fail me, and I can 
only add — and it is my opinion — that 
spring is not gentle. 



At St. Anne's Sunday School, in Lowell, 
in answer to the question, " Which is the 
greatest Church festival ? " a little orphan 
of six years promptly responded, " The 
strawberry festival." 



Asklsg In Intaf, 

"Well, John, what did they do at the 
society meeting to-night ? " 

" Oh, not much. Business dragged." 

" Good many there ? " 

" About the same as usual." 

" But didn't they do anything about the 
furnace ? " 

"Yes; a committee was appointed to 
see about it." 

Poor Mrs. Ellis sighs, and wishes she 
could know just one thing that somebody 
said. She tries a more direct line of ques- 
tioning. 

" What did Deacon Jones have to say ? " 

" Oh, the deacon was on the opposite 
side, as usual." 

" Opposite side of what? " 

" Well, almost anything that was pro- 
posed." 

"Can't you -tell one thing?" Mrs. 
Ellis' tone showed a little irritation. 

John looks at his wife in astonishment. 
Poor fellow ! He thinks he has answered 
every single question she has asked, and 
what is there to be cross about ? 

Feeling a little rebuked, Mrs. Ellis says, 
more gently : 

" What was the principal thing that 
Deacon Jones opposed ? " 

" I don't know as I can tell," said John, 
slowly. "He seemed just about as much 
opposed to one thing as another." 

In silence Mrs. Ellis watched the roguish 
flames as they laughed at her among the 
bright coals, while John became absorbed 
in a newspaper. 

Oh, Paul, Paul ! if you had only known 
what a hard time the poor women would 
have had of it, you would never have said 
that they must ask their husbands at 
home. 



THE CENTEMERI GLOVE. 

Best of kid, best fit, and lowest prices. Sold only by 
the manufacturers. Send name and address for " The 
Ladies' Hand-Book of Needle-Work," and my Color 
Card and price-list. 

CIIAS. H. REED, Sole Agent, 
22 Winter Street, Room 5, 

Opposite Music Hall Entrance. 

Wliolfsale and Retail. 

JONES, McDUFFEE & STRATTON, 

Importers of the 

POTTERY" AND GLASS-WARE 

Of all countries. All grades, from the commonest 
ware to the richest specimens. 

51 to 59 Federal Street, corner of Franklin, . . BOSTON'. 

CINE DADEBC AI1 of olu "]> a Pe r s we sell by the 
"lilt iRl Cllw pound at prices ranging from 25 



AND 



ENVELOPES 



cents to $1.00 per pound. Our 
assortment consists of the finest 
French, English and American 
papers, and we are constantly 
making additions to our stock. 
On receipt of a three-cent stamp we will send to parties 
unable to visit our store from flf ty to seventy-five samples 
of our cheapest as well as our best papers As nearly 
every kind is to be had in several sizes, ruled and un- 
ruled, it gives an assortment of over two hundred and 
fifty varieties from which to select. With these samples 
we send full information as to sizes and sheets to the 
pound, and envelopes to match. WARD & GAY, whole- 
sale and Retail Stationers, ISO Dev mslrre Street, Boston. 



L A^D I E S 

Wishing to have their 

Straw, Chip, Leghorn or Felt 

HATS AND BONNETS 

CLEANSED OR DYED, 

And made into the Latest Styles, will find at 



GuLlldl 



Wtm^^Umt ji 



535 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Next Door to Boston Theatre, 

A full line of samples, including' the latest novelties, to 
select from. 
■flSTObliging attendants, and hats ready when promised. 



JUST WHAT HASJEEM WANTED ! 
A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No, 30 Avon Street, Boston, 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other partdss served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



100 DOLLARS SAVED 



Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

C. D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 
BOSTON 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, . . . . . . 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 
Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, .... $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar 40 cents 

Pure Cassia, . . ... . .35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, ... 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger 12 cents lb. 

Fine Mixed Teas, from . . . . 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1 00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses 60 cents 



BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 



-AT- 



G. D. GOBB & BROTHERS, 

726 and 728 Washington Street. 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. — 



LASELL LEAVES. 




mm* 




I 



First Award at the late M. C. M. Association Fair, 
for the JSest Pliotographic Portraits. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 

353 Washington StreeV BOSTON. 

Personal attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 



We will open the finest and most varied stock of Val- 
entines, Jan. 27. Little girls and boys can make very 
pretty Valentine presents with our embossed pictures 
and paper, at cost of a few cents. 

J. JAY «OUJLl>, 1<> Bromfield St., BOSTON. 

A.BR.A1VL WRKNCJX. «Se CO. 

Importers of 

mm© iiiii^ 

CHINA, GLASS AND PLATE!) WAKES, 

Wholesale and retail, 

89, 91 and 93 Franklin Street, corner Devonshire, 

BOSTON. 

C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

And dealer in 
FRUIT, PRODUCE, POUZTRY, Etc. 



No. 24 North Market Street, 



BOSTON. 



SWAN <Sc NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

S. B. NEWTON. 

J. W. DAVIS, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Canned Fruits, Pickles, Crock" 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 

BRANCH CROCERY STORE, 

BOYTON BLOCK, NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASS. 



WEST NEWTON 

CASH 6RQG1EY, 



We keep the finest goods, and offer them at 

prices as low as any firm in New England, 

in Boston or out. Ask your neighbors 

who trade with us, if our goods 

and prices are not perfectly 

satisfactory. 

AUBURNDAIjE ORDERS taken every Tuesday 
and Friday, and delivered same day. 



ROBERTSON & SHERMAN, 

West Newton. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

^OXeEIGr^T ^.3iTX) j&.^vCEIEaiC-A.iT 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE ACENT FOR 

LITOLFF'8 CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 40 Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



Liberal discount made to Teachers. 

Selecting music for Teachers' Seminaries a specialty. 



Agency for Mine.. Demorest's Reliable Patterns. 



AUGUSTUS MORGAN, 

MAIM # ^ W P In ® Wg, 

IN"o. 35*7 'Washington Street, 

BOSTON. * 

Hair Jewelry of all kinds. Pins, Ear-Rings, etc., made 
to order. All kinds of Jewelry repaired. 

Make your own Chromo-Photographs by 
the NEW METHOD of 

PHOTO-ENAMEL PAINTING. 

The difficulties of spotting, etc., overcome. 

Any person can, in two hours, produce, from a photo- 
graph, an ELEGANTLY-PAINTED PORTRAIT, far 
superior and more permanent than by the old method. 
EULL INSTRUCTIONS, and composition enough to do 
two dozen cabinet portraits, sent on receipt of Thirty- 
five one-cent stamps. These pictures make handsome 
presents. Address 

HOME ARTS, 158 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

P. S.— Any Publisher desiring to insert the above, one- 
and-a-half inch, in his paper may send me a copy, stating 
price for six months. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 




Cards and Cabinets, Letter Stamps and 
Tintypes. Copying (torn otlier pictures, 
larger or smaller, for Autograph Cards, <fec. 
None better or cheaper than at 425 Wash- 
ington St., Boston, only up one flight. I am 
now giving my personal attention to opera- 
ting; have had over thirty years' practice. 

S. WING, 

425 Washington St., Boston. 



BOSTON AGENCY 



U BRITISH and UNTIL? IE CO, 

OF LONDON AND EDINBURGH. 

J. W. POETER, Agent, 

No. 27 STATE STREET. 



W. L. CLARK & CO. 

Successors to 




PORTRAITS 



In Oil, Water Colors, Crayon and Ink. 

C. M. LITCHFIELD. W. LORING CLARK. 



FROST & ADAMS. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Artliti' Materia 



Of Every Description, 



NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



■J! 




ORIENTAL TEA CO. 



87 Court Street, Boston. 



Wholesale and retail Dealers in 



TEAS, 



And Roasters and Dealers in 



COFFEE. 



The Coffee used at Lasell Seminary is furnished 
by the Oriental Tea Co. 



Teas and Coffees ordered by mail or by Lathrop's Ex- 
press, delivered at the residences in Auburndale, free 
of expense, the same day. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES. 



NOTICE. 

J. "VICKEKS 

Begs to inform the citizens of Auburndale, that he has 
removed to PLUMMER'S BLOCK, opposite the Depot, 
■where he will continue to sell the best class of 



QBOQEBI! 



of every description that can be found in the Market, at 
the 

LOWEST GASH PRICES. 

j8S-A11 goods delivered promptly and free. 

Plummer's Block, 

Auburn St., Auburndale. 




^.ILiFI=LE3Z) ^RUSH 



N 



OTMAN 



yvs. 



IXPh olograph^ 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, PARK Street. 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 



Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST., BOSTON, 

Stationers and flank foot Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAY 



Notman (fc Campbell, 

MONTREAL? 
And 4 Park Street, - - BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 

4^fon& photographers* 



COPYING, 

In all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



Plummer's Block, Comer Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 

INDIES AND GEMTLEMEM 

Visiting Boston, either on business or pleasure, should 
Dot fail to call at 

Learned & Oo.'s new and elegant Dining Saloon, 

where the choicest viands of the season are served at 
very moderate prices. 

413 Washington Street. 

THE EAaER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sols Manufacturors of "The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls. 

39 K INGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

NICHODS cfc E3:^>_IjI1j 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLANK BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 
G. HENRY HARPIN, 

Dealer in 

Wmmtm® Ibiii&Iilliti 

EEPAIEINQ PKOMPILY ATTENDED TO. 

auburn street, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 



n 

Patent Medicines, fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 



HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST. 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



FRANK WOOD, 

— STEAM PRINTER,— 

No. 352 Washington'Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON*. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 
AUBURNDALE. 

LIVERY, HACK ft BOARDING STABLE 

ALSO 
AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 
UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 

picvnis $m wmMMwm® 

GEO. S. BRYANT & CO. 
34' Bromfield. Street, .... Boston. 



Framing Reasonably and Promptly Done. 



MRS. L. COOK, 




Washington Avenue, AUBURNDALE. 

GRAND EDUCATIONAL EXCURSION TO EUROPE 

IN THE SUMMER OF 1879. 

Extended Tours through Great Britain and 
the most picturesque and interesting Continental 
countries. Special Advantages of an extraordinary 
character. The cheapest and best Excursion ever 
planned. For circulars, giving full particulars, address 
E. TOURJEE, Boston, Mass. 



For Student and all hinds of Lamps? 
Gas Fixtures, etc., call on S. Brownell 
& Son, 680 Washington Street, corner 
Beach Street, Boston. 

PIANO TEACHERS. 

The Boston Conservatory Method for the Piano-forte 
has heen thoroughly revised, and enlarged 100 new pages, 
thereby making it the most easy, thorough, progressive 
and complete instructor for the piano ever placed in the 
hands of teacher and pupil. The Boston Conservatory 
Method for the Piano-forte has no competitor, so far as 
grading and systematizing each lesson is concerned — a 
fact to which every teacher and pupil who has ever used 
it will testify. "We should be glad to have every teacher 
and pupil in America examine the revised and enlarged 
edition of this favorite Instruction Book, and ascertain 
for themselves whether it is not far superior to any of the 
old favorite methods of 25 years ago. Published with 
either foreign or American fingering, and sent, post free, 
on receipt of $2.50. WHITE, SMITH, & CO., Publishers, 
Boston, Mass. 

A FAVORITE YOUTH'S PAPER. 

The Youth's Companion, of Boston, has steadily grown 
in public favor for more than fifty years, and is new one 
of the most admirably-conducted papers in the country. 
It employs the same writers as the best English and 
American magazines, and no other publication for the 
family furnishes so much entertainment and instruction 
of a superior order for so low a price. Among its con- 
tributors are Dinah Muloch Craik, Miss Y/onge, J. T. 
Trowbridge, Louisa M. Alcott, Henry W. Long- 
fellow, James T. Fields, John G. Whittieh, and 
nearly fifty of the best story-writers. 

F. HE. iJPLUTA, 

DEALER IN 

PEOYISIONS, 

COE. AUBURN & LEXINGTON STS. 

FURNITURE. 



THE WAY BUSINESS IS DONE AT 

Paine's Manufactory, 

141 FEIEND ST. and 48 CANAL ST., 
BOSTON. 



SALES MAN'S OR DERS. 

Date your memorandum book every morning. Sell 
strictly for Cash, at the marked price. Represent goods 
just as you know them to be. 

Enter on your book, tind copy on delivery book, name 
of purchaser in full, where, when and how to be sent. 
Name each article, number and price. Hand your book 
to Entry Clerk to copy on to the Blotter, and to make 
bill; all bills to be receipted by Cashier. Have goods 
paid for before delivery, when you can do so; only con- 
ditionally delivered until paid for. Unless bills are to be 
paid before delivery, request parties with whom we are 
unacquainted to give names to whom they refer. 

All goods to be delivered by Delivery Clerk of the 
Department. 

See that every thing on your book is charged up every 
day on the Blotter. 

See the Delivery Book every morning, that all your 
orders have been delivered promptly. 

Promise only w hat you can fulfill. 

See that you have credit for all sales actually made by 
you. 

Be courteous to each other. 

Undertake to serve only one party at a time. 

By adopting these rules, and having the best-selected 
assortment of furniture to be found in America, this 
establishment is attracting the attention of customers far 
and near. See their new illustrated price list. 





TDTJIHL IF'ZEJ^THNr.A. PAOTI. 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., APRIL, 1879. 



Number 7. 



CARPETS! 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS k CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

in New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Garpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 
TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rugs, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, wo can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BOSTON. 



A Weaaa's Aaiwii to a H&a'g Qieetloi. 

Do you know you have asked for the costliest 
thing 

Ever made by the hand above — 
A woman's heart, and a woman's life, 

And a woman's wonderful love ? 

Do you know you have asked for this priceless 
thing, 

As a child might ask for a toy? 
Demanding what others have died to win, 

With the reckless dash of a boy ! 

You have written my lesson of duty out — 
Man-like have you questioned me ; 

Now stand at the bar of my woman's soul, 
Until I shall question thee. 

You require your mutton shall always be hot, 
Your socks and your shirts be whole : 

I require your heart to be true as God's stars, 
And pure as His heaven your soul. 

You require a cook for your mutton and beef; 

I require a far greater thing: 
A seamstress you're wanting for socks and for 

shirt ; 
I look for a man and a king : 

A king for the beautiful realm called home, 

And a man that the Maker, God, 
Shall look upon as He did the first, 

And say, " It is very good." 

I am fair and young, but the rose will fade 
From my soft young cheek one day ; 

Will you love me then, 'mid the falling leaves, 
As you did 'mid the bloom of May? 

Is your heart an ocean so strong and deep, 

I may launch my all on its tide? 
A loving woman finds heaven or hell, 

On the day she is made a bride. 

I require all things that are grand and true, 

All things that a man should be; 
If you give this all, I would stake my life 

To be all you demand of me. 

If you cannot be this — a laundress and cook 

You can hire, with little to pay ; 
But a woman's heart, and a woman's life, 

Are not to be won that way. 



69 ®f la© Wiate Tssm. 

Three more months of hard work and en- 
joyable study have passed, bringing us so 
much nearer the end of school and final 
farewells. 

The term has brought to us many pleas- 
ant things, which have been duly recorded 
in the "Leaves," and, on the whole, has 
been a time of profit to the most of us. 



The last three days of the term were not, 
as heretofore, devoted to examinations, al- 
though revieios were optional with the 
teachers. We have made a new " depart- 
ure " in this, as in other things, and no more 
sleepless nights or restless days are spent 
in worr}' over approaching examinations. 

The evenings of these days, however, 
were devoted, as usual, to various public 
exercises. , 



fifili' liiM liaiaf-iil 

On Monday evening, March 17, at an 
early hour, the Chapel was comfortably 
filled with an attentive, and, doubtless, ap- 
preciative audience ; the Concert, being, as 
usual, under the direction of Professors Hill 
and Wheeler. 

Miss Potter opened the programme with 
" Scheewitchen," an instrumental solo 
Miss Wells followed with " A Cradle Song," 
well rendered. " Aufder Wiese," by Miss 
Watts, was received with applause, A 
song, "The Lost Chord," by Miss Steven- 
son, was followed by an instrumental duet, 
forcibly rendered, by Miss Bacon and Prof. 
Hills. 

Misses Bowen and Stedman displayed 
erood training in their rendition of the vo- 
cal duet, "Spring Returning;" and Miss 
Wardwell closed Part I with two selec- 
tions : "Rondo in C Major," and "The 
Trill." 

Part II was opened by Miss Steell, who 
played with much taste, the Caprice by 
Giese, entitled, " Schon Rohtrant." Miss 
Morrill then sang " The Chorister," and Miss 
Lernard followed with an " Etude in F Sharp 
Major," played with decided skill. The 
vocal duet, " Wedding Violets," by Misses 
Bowen and Miller, elicited much well- 
merited applause; while a "Nocturne," 
by Liszt, was played with more than ordi- 
nary taste and delicacy of touch by Miss 
Turner. Miss Stedman fully deserved her 
hearty encore, by her rendering of the song 
entitled, " Moonlight ;" and the programme 
was closed with "Sextet," Op. 71, by 
Beethoven. It was arranged for two pianos, 
and played superbly by Misses Gowing and 
Hatch. 

The movements, " Agagio, Allegro, Ada- 



L A S E L L LEAVES. 



gio, Trennetto, Finale," were distinctly 
marked, and displayed much talent and 
faithful practice in their rendition. 



The following evening was occupied by 
the pupils of Prof. Kelley, in an Elocution. " 
ary Entertainment; which programme was 
varied by the introduction of "Dissolving 
Views," the instrument being ably man- 
aged by Prof. Moore. This feature of the 
entertainment seemed to give much satis- 
faction to the audience, and added much to 
the pleasure of the evening. Some of the 
first views were "Sir Walter Scott's 
Home," "His Library," "Edinburgh," 
"Scott's Monument," "Whitby Abbey," 
" Norham Castle," at a distance and close 
approach, " Markworth Castle," " Gifford's 
Tower," " Limlichgow," " Bamborough 
Castle," several views of " Holy Rood," 
and of " Circletown Castle," "Durham 
Cathedral," "Dunfermline Abbey," " Flod- 
den Field," etc., beside many idealistic 
scenes. 

The following young ladies took part in 
the programme ; Misses Bailey, Browne, 
Colburn, Converse, Cronise, Ellis, Hol- 
brook, Lee, MacKeown, Potter, Smith, 
Stedman and Whipple ; reciting with 
credit to themselves, their teacher and the 
school, selections from the annexed epit- 
ome of Marmion. Marmion betrays Con- 
stance from the convent. Afterward be- 
comes enamored with the lands and face of 
Lady Clare. To remove his rival, De Wil- 
ton attempts, and, with the aid of Constance, 
proves him, traitor to his king. Marmion 
enters the lists with De Wilton, who falls, 
but, recovering from his wounds, flees to 
other lands. Marmion, tired of Constance, 
delivers her to the convent Superiors, by 
whom she is punished. Before dying, she 
delivers a packet to the Abbess, revealing 
Marmion's baseness. De Wilton returns to 
Scotland, disguised as a palmer to Marmi- 
on's band : meeting with the Abbess of St- 
Hilda, obtains 'the packet of Constance, ac- 
quaints Douglass with Marmion's perfidy, 
discovers himself to Clare, in the Tower of 
Tantallon. Then follows the Battle of 
Flodden, in which Marmion is slain. 

The programme was somewhat varied by 
the introduction of vocal music, by Misses 
Morrill and Stedman, also the chorus class. 



Wednesday evening an invited audience 
gathered in the Chapel, to enjoy the exer- 
cises of the Class of '80. The walls were 



adorned with a fine display of studio work^ 
in the shape of oil paintings, crayon 
sketches, etc., done by the pupils of Miss 
West. Under the class motto, " Layer 
upon Layer," hung a beautiful floral de- 
sign ; the number '80, in violets, placed in a 
bed of white pinks, the whole surrounded 
by a border of roses, smilax, etc. On a 
stand upon the platform was placed a beau- 
tiful bouquet of various and rare flowers. 

Misses Hatch and Turner opened the 
programme with a difficult and brilliant 
vocal duet ; after which prayer was offered 
by Rev. A. B. Kendig, of Worcester. 

Miss Gertrude Benyon, the first essayist, 
read an entertaining article upon "The 
Junior Class ;" followed by " Lights and 
Shadows," an essay read by Miss Lucy E. 
Curtis. SHe portrayed with ease, and in a 
simple, straightforward style, the life of a 
child up through maidenhood and into 
womanhood. A vocal solo, by Miss Kate 
Miller, was followed by " One Learns by 
Failing," Miss Annie M. Holbrook's essay. 
The truth of this assertion was forcibly 
and clearly proved to the audience by the 
fair reader. 

Miss Annie Kendig then read an essay 
upon "Gleaners," opening with a beauti- 
ful word-picture of Ruth, and closing with 
the description of gleaners in life's harvest 
field. 

Misses Bowen and Stedman sang with 
taste a vocal duet, and the last essay, 
" Women Soldiers," was read by Miss 
Lillie R. Potter. Examples were given 
from history, in an accurate and pleasing 
manner, and the speaker closed by pre- 
senting to her listeners a view of woman 
fighting bravely against sin and injustice. 
After this brilliant effort, Miss Fanny Dill- 
erance played, with finished touch and 
exquisite taste, an instrumental solo ; and 
the programme was closed with the bene 
diction, pronounced by the Rev. Mr. 
Stevenson. 

Beautiful floral offerings were presented 
to the young ladies, at the close of each 
essay, by the ushers, Misses Converse and 
MacKeown, class of '81. At the close of 
the public exercises the Juniors received 
their friends in the parlor, and an hour or 
so was spent in social intercourse. Thus 
the term came to a successful and pleasant 
close. 



1 1 SiBsefiBess. 

We have heard, incidentally, of several 
persons who have not received all their 
papers during the year. If any have not 
received all the copies, if they will let us 
know, by addressing the Subscription 
Agent, we shall be happy to send them the 
missing numbers. We try to be very care- 
ful that all shall be sent ; but, by mistake 
or carelessness, some may have been neg 
lected. 



Last Wednesday evening, March 26th, 
we met again in the Chapel, to hear the 
second of Professor Hills' delightful con- 
certs. 

We think this one surpassed the first in 
the course. Prof. H. had for his assistants 
on this evening, Mr. C. N. Allen, violin, 
and Mr. Edward Schuman, French horn. 

The first thing on the programme was a 
trio, Op. 40, composed by Brahms, and 
rendered by Messrs. Hills, Allen and Schu- 
man. 

Mr. Allen then gave us a rare treat on 
his violin ; the encore was unanimous. Mr. 
Hill next played a grand piano solo with 
his usual skill, which we all know so well 
and try to appreciate. 

Mr. Schuman played a Sonata, by Bee- 
thoven, on the French horn, which was 
finely rendered ; this piece closed the con- 
cert. 



A sparkling young debater, in a flight 
of eloquence, exclaimed : " Mr. President, 
the world is divided into two great classes, 
the learned and the unlearned, one of whom 
I am which." 



The S. D. Society met, as usual, Friday 
evening last, and the election of officers for 
the ensuing term took place, which was as 
follows : President, Miss Sanford ; Vice- 
President, Miss Turner ; Secretary, Miss 
C. Kendig ; Treasurer, Miss Morrill; Critic, 
Miss Boune ; Usher, Miss Stedman. This 
evening there was also a change of pro- 
gramme, the subject being " Humor," and 
the characters taken being Tom Hood and 
Charles Lamb. The persons on the pro- 
gramme made the evening very pleasant. 
The society is growing in numbers — hav- 
ing at present about twenty-five members — 
and in strength in the school. We could 
not do without it now. 



,le in it . 

While Thomas Carlyle was one morn- 
ing taking his customary walk, a well- 
dressed man approached him with the 
remark : " Are you really the great Thomas 
Carlyle, author of the French Revolution V* 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



" I am Thomas Carlyle," was the reply, 

" and I have written a history of the French 

Eevolution." "Indeed! Pray, pardon a 

stranger for speaking to you ; but I was so 

anxious to have a look at you." " Look on, 

man!" quoth the philosopher, impatiently, 

as he resumed his walk: "look on! It 

will do me no harm, and do you no good." 

— Ex. 



«M 



latt! p®ps iBaTBS." 

The valleys and plains have their fertile 
pastures, gi'oves, and ever-varying beauty : 
the sea has its own peculiar, indescribable 
charms ; but 'tis the mountains, the " ever- 
lasting hills, " that give grandeur, majesty 
and loveliness to the landscape. It seems 
as if they were a part of humanity ; we 
have a reverent love for them, as for 
old and tried friends. 

How natural the longing of the fair 
Queen Amytis, for the hills of her native 
Ecbatana ; and can we think that even the 
wondrous " Hanging Gardens " of Babylon 
quite filled the void in her heart? 

Helicon and Parnassus were the haunts 
of the muses ; when the gods dwelt among 
men, the mountains were their home, and 
the Oreads were mountain nymphs. But 
it is man whom they govern, whom they 
protect, over whom they have watched, 
since the foundations of the world, and 
whose fate they have ordered not a little. 

Looking over the histories of nations, 
we find their weal or woe has largely de- 
pended on the physical characteristics of 
the country. Geography and history are 
closely related. Greece is a prominent ex- 
ample ; traversed by steep mountain rang- 
es, only passable by narrow, dangerous 
defiles, and states were completely isolated 
by these natural barriers. Hence it was 
that many distinct communities sprang up, 
differing in government and religion, 
and whose various customs and ideas were 
the fertile source of struggles and rival- 
ries. Thus was Grecian history crowded 
with events, and fruitful in political in- 
struction. Much of the beauty and variety 
of their literature, is referred to their emi- 
nently elevating surroundings. It is a 
well-known and undisputed fact, that 
bravery and courageous daring are most 
frequently found among the children of the 
heights. Liberty has ever found a home 
in mountain pastures. 

Alps, Andes and Apennines, have alike 
infused into man their own sublimity, en- 
durance, and all heroic, elevated qualities. 
Living among nobility, what vast store- 



houses of treasures are they, too ! " Gold 
lies deep in the mountain," and that is but 
a symbol of the vast mineral resources 
which there await man's toil. 

The wild birds and beasts find homes in 
its caves, and in the depths of its forest ; 
and there the rill, first appearing, spark- 
ling in the sunlight, gathers its forces as it 
trickles over the rocks, till, a roaring cata- 
ract, it plunges down precipices, and 
through unfathomable chasms. Glaciers 
and avalanches are there in awful beauty, 
and the geologist searches the mountains 
for traces of the early world. 

Unmoved, but ever changing, these, na- 
ture's masterpieces, defy the arts of the 
poet and ai'tist as does the dusky cloud- 
let, that, lingering a moment on the moun- 
tain brow, breaks into indescribable efful- 
gence as the rays of the rising sun touch 
its edges. 

Its beauty is not transient, but varied, 
and never enduring. From the spring 
morning, when it lies, grey and cold, in the 
distance, waiting for the " king of day " to 
crown it with glory, through the warm 
summer days, when flowers, ferns and pines 
fill the air with their inspiring odors, and 
now and then the thunder and storm show 
another phase ; through the autumn, when 
the rich and russet hues of slopes and emi- 
nences make a king in regal robes, to the 
winter time, when it dons its robe of feath- 
ery white, it stands unrivaled. Who can 
describe the emotions which the moun- 
tains call forth ! There are many of whom 
it might be said as of Wordsworth's shep- 
herd — who, 

" Had early learned 
To reverence the volume which displays 
The majesty, the life which cannot die. 
But in the mountains did he feel his faith ; 
There did he see the writing. All things 
There breathed immortality, revolving life, 
There littleness was not; and the least things 

Seemed infinite." 

Man, as he looks up to their towering 
summits, feels dwarfed, weak and power- 
less, but, withal, a yearning for something 
better than he has known — a longing for 
the unknown, a craving for power, for 
goodness and greatness ; but what a grand 
feeling of might swells within him, and how 
his heart throbs, as, looking down from the 
height of some mountain-top, he realizes 
the grand possibilities of his nature, the 
immortal soul, which he alone possesses, 
making him monarch of all nature, and 
ruler of the world. The invigorating breeze 
blows all the cobwebs from his brain, all 
sad thoughts from his heart, and with every 
breath inspired and refreshed, he feels only 



th 



he " godlike power to do ; the godlike 
aim to know." 



Our Exchanges, 

The University Herald, of the Syracuse 
University, for March, contains an article 
on the much-debated question of "Com- 
mencement." The class of " "19 " have de- 
cided to substitute an address by a speaker 
from abroad, in the place of the usual 
exercises. 

We are quite certain that our friend and 
neighbor the Newton Gazette would greatly 
increase its attractiveness by changing the 
tint of its paper. 

Glad to receive the Tripod from N. W. 
U. Its article entitled "Our Honored 
Dead," is an interesting one. 

The College Echo comes to us in a most 
pleasing form, and contains quite a number 
of lengthy articles. 

Notwithstanding the foreboding picture 
which adorns the cover of the Philadelphia 
Beacon, it is a spicy sheet. The article 
entitled "Individual Opinion," is full of 
truth — wish every one could read it. 



lagfy lays. 



They were such happy days ! 

When, light-hearted and gay, 
By brook and through meadow 

We wandered all day ; 
When we listened to bird-songs 

Full of spring's praise ; 
Ah ! we knew not of sorrow 

In those happy days. 

Years passed and days followed, 

Still happy and long — 
The days when we learned that 

God gave us the song: 
And when there came dark days, 

Clouded by sorrow, 
We said, " He will give us 

A happy to-morrow." 

And we've been so happy 

In days when we knew 
That dear hearts beat close to us, 

Tender and true : 
And now when our hearts hav e grown 

Heavy with care, 
We look for long, happy days 

Soon, over there ! 



Our eyes happened to fall on this " little 
gem," in one of our exchanges ; and we 
insert it, that our Latin classes may know, 
if they have not already discovered it, that 
there is " a meter by no means as prosaic " 
as that found in their Latin grammars. 
"There's a meter dactyl, there's a metre 
spondaic." 

There's a metre for a laugh and a groan ; 

There's still yet a metre by no means prosaic, 

' Tis to meet her — by moonlight alone! " 

Ex. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



THE LASELL LEAVES 

IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR, 

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%m ums. 

Goethe tells us that "kindness is the 
golden link by which society is bound to- 
gether ; " but many a poor unfortunate has 
reason to think that kindness was left en- 
tirely out of the chain, for the golden link 
becomes tarnished, and there are few care- 
ful, or willing, to polish it ; so that some 
of earth's children have never once seen 
it gleam out, bright and yellow, from the 
dark, surrounding metal. Think of it, you 
children of happiness, you who have never 
received other than kind words and tender 
treatment from anyone, who have loving 
friends to care for you, and anticipate 
every want ; you who have been reared in 
happiness — think what life must be to 
those on the dark side of the picture ! 

It may not seem possible to you that iD 
this beautiful, pleasant world, so full of 
enjoyments to you, that there can be any 
dark side ; but, alas! there is a side which 
would make you shudder, could you real- 
ize half its horrors. In full contrast to the 
- 1 comfort and happiness in which you live, 



there are thousands who know not the 
meaning of one kind word ; who, reared in 
an atmosphere of poverty, abuse and pro- 
fanity, become familiar with crime in all 
its horrible forms, and learn to curse their 
fellow-beings who, from their pinnacle of 
enjoyment, forget the suffering of those be- 
low. Would it be a hard task for us to 
give a helping hand, and raise some of 
these poor wretches from their low posi- 
tion ? Would it not rather be a pleasure 
and a source of blessing, to know that we 
gave the first kind word of comfort and in- 
struction to " one of the least of these ! " 
We are apt to excuse ourselves, and shirk 
the duty by saying, " What can one do in 
such a community of wickedness ?" The 
Saviour's parable teaches that the leaven in 
the meal imparted its properties only to the 
particles in immediate contact with it, 
which, in turn, performed the same work ; 
and so on till the whole was leavened. So 
in society : we can, perhaps, effect only in- 
dividuals ; but a community is made up of 
individuals, all having more or less effect 
upon each other ; and a kindness exercised 
on one, must have some effect upon the 
whole. 

But it is not alone in such relations as 
these that the golden link is neglected, 
and loses its luster. In the home and 
friendly circles there is too often a lack 
of kindness, resulting in heart-aches and 
wounds that perhaps are never healed. Do 
kind words and acts cost so much that we 
must be chary of them '( Do we never 
think that they are the meet return to the 
loving father, mother and friends who 
strive so hard to make us happy, and keep 
us from the stern realities of life by their 
tender watchfulness. 

" We have careful thought for the stranger, 
And smile for the sometime guest ; 
But oft for " our own " 
The bitter tone, 
Though we love our own the best. " 

Surely, the proof that we " love them 
best " would be in kind, tender thoughtful- 
ness. 

Often we hear it said of a lady, "how 
perfectly she entertains ; " or of a gentle- 
man, "we cannot have our company a suc- 
cess without him." Why? Because they 
are attentive to each one, thoughtful for 
the comfort and entertainment of all — in 
short, are thoroughly polite, and true 
politeness is simply kindness. Why, then, 
let ourselves forget it, why neglect the 
precious link that binds us to one an- 
other ? No other can take its place ; socie- 
ty can not be bound together by sham 



politeness, which neglects the poor and 
unfortunate, and seeks attention from the 
influential or wealthy. Nothing is strong 
enough to hold the chain except the golden 
link made according to the Golden Rule, 
which bids us to do unto others as we 
would have them do to us. 



PhbqmIb. 

We miss the kind, motherly face of Mrs. 
Bragdon. 

Miss Nellie Whipple has left Lasell for 
her home at Wellesley. We are very sorry 
to lose Nellie; she has "gone, but is not 
forgotten." 

On the evening of the 19th of March, the 
" Juniors " were delighted to see in their 
midst the pleasant faces of Misses Lin- 
scott, Moulton and Stocking. 

" What is one man's gain, is another's 
loss," we thought, when Professor Brag- 
don left us to spend a few days in Spring- 
field. 

Miss Georgie Hatch, one of our present 
scholars, has been suffering for a few days 
past with a felon. We hope she will be 
better soon, and that we shall not long be 
deprived of her music. 

One of our former students, Miss Amy 
Kelly, now Mrs. Adams, is the happy 
mother of a second little one. 

At the beginning of the spring term 
Miss Katie Miller resumed her studies at 
Lasell. We are all pleased to have her 
with us once more ; and no longer keep up 
the "dreadful thinking" of " Oh who will 
fill that vacant chair ! " 

Miss Lillian Potter has recovered from 
her late illness, and is once more enjoying 
that blessing of blessings, good health. 

Misses Mame and Bella Phelps have 
left Lasell for the West ; thus " Westward 
thestar(s) of empire takes its (their) way." 



Last Saturday, the 22d, we gratefully ac- 
cepted Miss Parloa's invitation to visit her, 
at her rooms on Tremont Street. And now 
all of us know how to put bread to rise, to 
knead it, and " pat it and pat it, and throw 
it in the pan." We can make Parker House 
rolls, and Graham rolls ; we can make such 
things as will agreeably surprise our 
mothers, when we go home ; and for all 
this gain, we can thank the nice, good fairy 
who presides over Miss Parloa's pleasant 
kitchen. The end is not yet ; there was a 
great surprise to come, in the form of choc- 
olate and vanilla ice-creams and cake. 



LA SELL LEAVES. 



Were we girls happy ? Please ask Miss 
Parloa ; and if it be true that the " face is 
the in dexof the heart," she will say, assur- 
edly, " Yes indeed." Before leaving, a vote 
of thanks was offered to Miss Parloa by 
every member present. We hope to profit 
by all that she taught us and did for us, 
thereby showing her that good is always 
highly prized. 



Katie is back. 

An S. D. pin lost I 

Will Spring ever come ? 

Would we had been in Dresden ! 

The studio seems to be filling up this 
term. 

The long-expected cap for the telescope 
has arrived. 

How strange the Chapel looks, with the 
small platform ! 

The Seniors, Juniors and Specials spent 
a delightful evening at Mr. Latimer's, not 
long since. 

Last vacation of the school year is over. 
Cooking lectures are over ; and who is not 
sorry ? Oh ! to be a Senior, and have a 
week's vacation. 

Any one who wishes to study some of 
the pictures of the old masters, please step 
into recitation room No. 4 ; they will find 
them arranged on the walls. 

A new errand-boy fills the place of the 
youth who has been with us so long. The 
faces of the Juniors were visibly short- 
ened the morning of the 20th. 

You need not be surprised if you see all 
the early shoots on the plants and trees 
near the Sem. stripped off, for we are an 
enthusiastic botany class this year. 

We long for Spring, and the regular ex- 
cursions which come with it. We expect 
to visit Plymouth this year on our trip, as 
the school have not been there for two 
years. 

Mr. Hill's second classical concert 
passed off nicely, as we knew it would. 
We hope the abundance of evergreen 
which decorated the Junior motto did not 
dazzle any one present on the eventful 
evening. 



Igia 

A Clergyman was recently telling a mar- 
velous story, when his little girl said : 
" Now, pa, is that really true, or is, it just 
preaching ? " 



Boarding-school miss — " Oh, Charlie ! I 
expect to graduate at next Commence- 
ment." " Graduate ! What will yon grad- 
uate in ? " " Why, in white tulle ? " 

Science says now that kissing on the lips 
must be abolished, in the interest of health. 
Most potent, grave and reverend seigniors, 
scholars and philosophers, there are mo- 
ments you know nothing of, when a man 
don't care two cents for science, and when 
he is going to plant kisses where they be- 
long, if the laws of health are ripped from 
Alpha to Beersheba. — Stillwater Lum- 
berman. 



Within thirty years Longfellow will be 
little read, is the prediction of a noted 
critic, who is an especial admirer of Words- 
worth. 

The probability rather is, that as long as 
the English language shall continue, Long- 
fellow will be read with ever-renewed 
delight. The eminent distinction of Long- 
fellow is that he has voiced the general 
heart of humanity, in words intelligible to 
the illiterate and the child ; in words so 
felicitously chosen and combined, that, for 
the most part, art is concealed, and the 
highest cultivation is satisfied. Through 
the medium of his verse the vital pulsations 
are almost transferred, and readers of duller 
sensibilities are pleased seemingly to find 
themselves other than they knew before ; 
and those of a more delicate mold are 
charmed with the first expression of pleas- 
ures hitherto unutterable. Longfellow 
touches nothing that he does not adorn. 
He raises the commonplace things of life 
above all meannesses. 

He repeats, but to get in better phrase. 
He tells an old story anew, but as it was 
never told before. He is not what is called 
an original or profound writer. No guide, 
no critical introduction, no long commen- 
tary, no special study, no large endowment, 
is requisite in order to begin to enjoy his 
poems ; and yet he is a man of multifarious 
reading, of extensive learning, and one 
appreciates him the more for having trav- 
ersed some part of the same field of knowl- 
edge, as everywhere are found tokens of 
his learning that is always left to be dis- 
covered, is never ostentatiously displayed. 

Patchwork-making is the art of selecting 
and fitting various materials, and combin- 
ing them with a supplementary material, in 
accordance with a pre-determined plan. 

The supplementary material may be spar- 
ingly used, but in certain relations with 



every other part ; or it may be in larger 
proportions, till it predominates. 

Longfellow's " Psalm of Life " is an ex- 
ample of literary patchwork. 

In mosaic work there is a combination of 
materials of essentially one kind, but of 
different varieties and from different sources. 
A poem constructed entirely of lines drawn 
from a variety of sources is a literary 
mosaic. 

Of his simplicity, there is a felt example 
in the poem, "From My Arm-Chair," to 
the children of Cambridge, in recognition 
of their gift, on his seventy-second birth- 
day, of a chair made from wood of the 
chestnut before the blacksmith's shop which 
he celebrated so many years ago. Long- 
fellow's simplicity is genuine ; whereas 
Wordsworth is prone to affect simplicity, 
and his affected simplicity sometimes differs 
little from silliness. 

It is not because he is the fashion, that 
Longfellow is read ; it is that he gives 
pleasure alike to the fashionable and to the 
unfashionable, to the high and the low, to 
the learned and the unlearned. More than 
any other man, he is the poet of all. 
Greater poets may arise, but Longfellow 
cannot be displaced, till in more melodious 
lays are sung scenes pertaining to happier 
society and the sentiments of purified hu- 
manity. 

Girls, learn the following, to have ready 
the next time Prof, asks us to name the 
presidents ! 

George Washington first to the White House 

came, 
And next on the list is John Adam's name. 

Tom Jefferson then filled the honored place; 

The name of James Madison next we trace. 

The fifth in succession was James Munroe, 

And John Quincy Adams the next below; 

Then Andrew Jackson was placed in the 

chair, 
And next we find Martin Van Buren there. 
Then William Harrison's name we meet, 
Whose death to John T}'ler gave the seat. 
Next James K. Polk was the nation's choice ; 
Then for Zachary Taylor she raised her voice, 
Whose premature death brought in Millard 

Fillmore, 
And next Franklin Pierce the distinction 

wore, 
The fifteenth was James Buchanan, they say, 
Who for Abraham Lincoln prepared the way, 
Whose martyrdom gave Andrew Johnson a 

chance ; 
The eighteenth name was Ulysses S. Grant's. 
By means of dark and dubious ways, 
The nineteenth now is R. B. Hayes. 



Now is the time for essays on " Spring," 
the most beautiful season of the year." 



6 



LASELL LEAVES. 



nmail 

Above all features which adorn the fe- 
male character, delicacy stands foremost 
within the province of good taste. Not 
that delicacy which is perpetually in quest 
of something to be ashamed of, which makes 
mirth of a blush, and simpers at the false 
construction its own ingenuity has put up- 
on an innocent remark, — this spurious kind 
of delicacy is far removed from good sense, 

— but the high-minded delicacy which main- 
tains its pure and undeviating walk alike 
among women and in the society of men; 

— which shrinks from no necessary duty, 
and can speak, when required, with a seri- 
ousness and kindness, of things at which 
it would be ashamed to blush or smile ; 
that delicacy which knows how to confer 
a benefit without wounding the feelings of 
another — which can give alms without as- 
sumption, and pains not the most suscepti- 
ble being in creation. — Ex. 

Every man likes flattery. It is pleasant 
to be told that we are great, even if we 
know him to be a fool who tells us — .Ex. 

We are to enjoy a rare treat this month 
in having Mr. James T. Fields give us an- 
other course of his delightful lectures, the 
first of which will occur on Wednesday 
evening, April 9th : subject, " Bryant", with 
an introduction upon " The study of Eng- 
lish literature. " The lectux'es will occur 
every Wednesday evening during this 
month, the other subjects being, Burns, 
Byron and Milton. 

The old girls who have heard Mr. Fields 
before, anticipate a great deal, and we are 
sure not to be disappointed. 



There is something extremely pleasant, 
and even touching, — at least, of very sweet, 
soft and winning effect, — in this peculiarity 
of needle-work, distinguishing women from 
men. Our own sex is incapable of any 
such by-play aside from the business of 
life ; but women — be they of what earthly 
rank they may, however gifted with intel- 
lect or genius, or endowed with earthly 
beauty — have always some handiwork 
ready to fill the tiny gap of every vacant 
moment. A needle is familiar to the fin- 
gers of them all. A queen, no doubt, plies 
it on occasions ; the woman-poet can use 
it as adroitly as her pen ; the woman's eye 
that has discovered a new star, turns from 
its glory to send the polished little instru- 
ment gleaming along the hem of her ker- 
chief, or to darn a casual fray in her dress. 
And they have greatly the advantage of us 



in this respect. The slender thread of silk 
or cotton keeps them united with the small 
familiar, gentle interests of life, the contin- 
ually operating influences of which do so 
much for the health of the character, and 
carry off what would otherwise be a dan- 
gerous accumulation of morbid sensibility. 
A vast deal of human sympathy runs along 
this electric line, stretching from the throne 
to the wicker chair of the humblest seam- 
stress, and keeping high and low in a 
species of communion with their kindred 
beings. Methinks it is a token of healthy 
and gentle characteristics, when women of 
high thoughts and accomplishments love to 
sew; especially as they are never more at 
home with their own hearts than while so 
occupied. And when the work falls in a 
woman's lap of its own accord, and the 
needle involuntarily ceases to fly, it is a 
sign of trouble, quite as trustworthy as the 
throb of the heart itself. 



l&y Well ni & WML 

In closing a sermon on " Good Works 
and Good Words," Dean Stanley, of West- 
minster, quoted the following lines, which 
some suppose were written by one of the 
earliest Deans of Westminster: 

" Say well is good, but do well is better ; 

Do well seems the spirit, say well is the letter. 

Say well is goodly, and helps to please; 

But do well is godly, and gives the world ease. 

Say well to silence sometimes is bound ; 

But do well is free on every ground. 

Say well has friends — some here, some there ; 

But do well is welcome everywhere. 

By say well many to God's Word cleave ; 

But for lack of do well it often leave. 

If say well and do well were bound in one 

frame, 
Then all were done, all were one, and gotten 

were gain." 



There is a certain Mr. Halliday, who does 
(his sort of) business at 33 Temple Place, 
Boston, on whom we propose to waste a 
little space. He had an advertisement in 
the Leaves, December, 1877, but did not 
pay for it. After coaxing him, month after 
month, in all the indirect and subtle ways 
known to us girls, but never getting any 
kind of answer or notice, even a postal- 
card, saying he was sorry, we called upon 
him in March, 1879. Our bill was only 
the modest sum of $2.00. He looked as if 
he ate at a good table, and was extremely 
polite to us until we mentioned our errand. 
Then he froze right up, like the cream 
under Miss Parloa's magic hand, and could 
not say a word except, "I can't pay it 



now ; come next month." Next month ! 
and it had been fifteen long months al- 
ready! and those stairs to climb again! 
and all the postage-stamps wasted ! and 
only two little dollars! We turned thought- 
fully and sadly away. Next month came, 
and we went. What do you think? Mr. 
Halliday, blandly smiling, said, " I have 
been compelled to take the insolvent act ! " 
We plainly suggested that he knew it 
when we were there before, and had there- 
fore postponed. We made him, then and 
there, a present of that $2.00 and interest, 
and resolved to give the poor man about 
ten dollars' worth more ; and now he has 
it. Our blessing with it; and if the man (?) 
who would deliberately despoil unsuspect- 
ing girls, trying to run a paper and make 
it pay its expenses, of two dollars, after 
such a fashion, comes to want, as he surely 
will, let him pass his hat, and we will 
prove the sincerity of our forgiveness by a 
more liberal contribution yet! 

We beg to say, in grateful acknowledg 
ment of the uniform courtesy, and patience 
and liberality with which the business men 
of Boston and suburbs have met our awk- 
ward efforts to pay our way, that in no 
other case (excepting that of a Mr. Whit- 
comb, who used to have a half-shop on 
Bromfield Street, and is, we guess, a man 
somewhat after the stamp of Mr. Halliday) 
have we lost any money. Nor has any one 
tried in the least to take advantage of our 
verdancy. We suspect they have laughed 
at us often. We don't resent that; Mr. 
Bragdon laughs at us, and we laugh at our- 
selves when we find out how unused we are 
to business ways. But we are trying to 
learn, we mean to be honest, if we are not 
smart, and to give a fair equivalent for the 
generous patronage so kindly given us by 
our best friends, the liberal, enterprising and 
upright business men represented in our 
(usually) clean and reliable advertising 
columns. The Publisher. 



The Librarian acknowledges, with thanks, 
the receipt from the State Board of Educa- 
tion of several volumes of the yearly Re- 
ports on Education, procured for us by 
the kindness of our fellow-townsman, Mr. 
Joseph Huestis. 



A little six-year-old, upon finding a lone 
and solitary stick of candy in his stocking 
on Christmas morning, mournfully ex- 
claimed, " Gracious ! if I had been born 
twins, I'd only got half this much ! " 



LASELL LEAVES. 




L 





S. 



$1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


$1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


$1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


$1 50 


1 50 


1 50 



NOVELS BY MISS A. M. DOUGLAS. 

Home No >k ; or, The Crown of Duty, 

In Trust; or, Dr. Bertrand's Household, 

Nelly Kinnard's Kingdom, 

From Hand to Mouth, 

Stephen Dane, 

Claudia, 

Sydnie Adriance; or, Trying the World, 

Seven Daughters, 

SOPHIE MAY'S BOOKS. 

The Doctor's Daughter, 
Our Helen, 
Quinnebasset Girls, 
The Asbury Twins, 

MISS VIRGINIA F. TOWNSEND'S 

That Queer Girl, 

Only Girls, 

A Woman's Word, and What Came of it, 

MISS ADELINE TRAFTON'S. 

Katherine Earle, 

An American Girl Abroad, 

His Inheritance, 

All of the abOve books are handsomely bound in cloth, 
and can be procured from any bookseller, or will be sent 
by mail, postpaid, on receipt of price by the Publisher. 
Our complete catalogue mailed free to any address on 
application. 

LEE 8c SHEPARD, Publishers, Boston. 

JT. F>. CLARK, 

FLORIST, 

Corner of Park and. Tremont Streets, 

BOSTON. 

Cut Flowers, Wreaths, Bouquets, Wedding Flowers, 
and Party Decorations furnished at short notice. 

Lilies of the Valley and Jacqueminot Roses a specialty. 

Also, Green-House Plants, etc. 

SWAN «5c NEWTON, 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry, Wild Game, &c. 

No. 18 Faneuil Hall Market, 

HENRY SWAN. BOSTON. 

B. B. NEWTON. 

J. W. DAVIS," 

AUBURKDALE, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Goods, Notions, Trimmings, 

AND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

LADIES' GOODS AND SMALL WARES. 

Also, Family Groceries, Cloned Fruits, Pickles, Crock- 
ery, Glassware, Flour, etc., etc. 

BRANCH CROCERY STORE, 

BOYTON BLOCK, NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASS. 



Agency for Mine. Demorest's Reliable Patterns. 



UNMOUNTED PHOTOGRAPHS. 

A large and 

CHOICE COLLECTION 

From works of the old and modern masters, prepared 
expressly 

FOR ART ALBUMS. 

Call and examine or send for catalogue. 

JOHN P. SOULE, Publisher, 
338 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

Wholesale and Retail. 

JONES, McDUFFEE & STRATTON, 

Importers of the 

POTTERY AND GLASS-WARE 

Of all countries. All grades, from the commonest 
ware to the richest specimens. 

51 to 55 Federal Street, corner of Franklin, . , BOSTON, 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT, 

Importer of and Dealer in 

FOEEIG-1T .A_3STZ3 -A-MEIEaiC-A-iT 

SHEET MUSIC, 

SOLE ACENT FOR 

LITOLFF'S CELEBRATED EDITION OF 

CLASSICAL & MODERN MUSIC. 

No. 40 Winter Street. 



Catalogues Mailed Free on Application 



Liberal discount made to Teachers. 

Selecting music for Teachers' Seminaries a specialty. 

AUGUSTUS MORGAN, 

S A I ]B ^EWHIa® 5 !^ 

No. 357 'Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 

Hair Jewelry of all kinds. Pins, Ear-Rings, etc., made 
to order. All kinds of Jewelry repaired. 

Make your own Chromo-Photographs by 
the NEW METHOD of 

PHOTO-ENAMEL PAINTING. 

The difficulties of spotting, etc., overcome. 

Any person can, in two hours, produce, from a photo- 
graph, an ELEGANTLY- PAINTED PORTRAIT, far 
superior and more permanent than by the old method. 
PULL INSTRUCTIONS, and composition enough to do 
two dozen cabinet portraits, sent on receipt of Thirty- 
five one-cent stamps. These pictures make handsome 
presents. Address 

HOME ARTS, 158 Clark St., Chicago, III. 

P. S. — Any Publisher desiring to insert the above, one- 
and-a-half inch, in his paper may send me a copy, stating 
price for six months. 




PHOTOGRAPHY. 



Cards and Cabinets, Letter Stamps and 
Tintypes. Copying from other pictures, 
larger or smaller, for Autograph Cards, Szc. 
None better or cheaper than at 425 Wash- 
ington St., Boston, only up one flight. 1 am 
now giving my personal attention to opera- 
ting; have had over thirty years' practice. 

S. "WIKrGi-, 

425 Washington St., Boston. 



BOSTON AGENCY 



MTH BRITISH and mim DR. CO, 

OF LONDON AND EDINBURGH. 

J. W. POSTER, Agent, 

No. "7 STATE STREET. 



JUST WHAT HAS BEEN MTSD ! 
A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

Has been opened at 

No. 30 Avon Street, Boston, 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
very reasonable price. 

All the Ladies say, "IS N'T IT NICE?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



Also, Wedding and other Parties served with the 
choicest viands and by competent waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE CREAM, 

Delivered at reasonable prices. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Artliti 1 Material; 



Of Every Description, 

NOS. 33 & 35 CORNHILL, 

BOSTON. 

J. J. GOULD'S 
SPECIALTIES, 

Embossed Pictures, Scrap-Books, Gift Cards for all, 
seasons. Decalcomanie, Fancy Paper, Perforated and 
Plain Card, Picture Frames, Mats etc. Japanese goods, 
etc. Wonders for children's fancy work. 



lO Bromfield Street, 



BOSTON. 



XHE CENTEMERI GLOVE. 

Best of kid, best fit, and lowest prices. Sold only by 
the manufacturers. Send name and address for " The 
Ladies' Hand-Book of Needle-Work," and my Color 
Card and price-list. 

CHAS. H. REED, Sole AGENT, 
22 Winter Street, Room 5, 

Opposite Music Hall Entrance. 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

And dealer in 
FRUIT, PRODUCE, POULTRY, JEtc. 



No, 24 North Market Street, 



BOSTON. 



RAND, AVERY & CO., 

PRINTERS, 

117 FRANKLIN ST., BOSTON. 



W. BAILEY, 

dealer in 



353 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Personal attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 



PAPER HANGINGS. 

BRADFORD & WILLIAMS, 

have the largest stock of paper hangings this side of Bos- 
ton, at very low prices, also a full line of Window Shades, 
Holland arid Opaque Shades, made and put up to order. 
BRADFORD & WILLIAMS. 
No. 1 Central Block, Opp. Post Office, 
Waltham, Mass, 



8 



LA SELL LEAVES. 




jtofisf f MQgjMpftw, 



493 WASHINGTON STREET, 



Between Temple Place 
and West Street, 



BOSTON. 



Photographs 

Of Colleges, Seminaries and Academies at very 
SEASONABLE RATES. 

S. W. BAXLEY, 

DEALER IN 

353 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

Personal attention given to Repairing Tine Watches. 



N 



OTMAN 



1 



yVl 



^2Ph oto0raphcr 1 



Late of 
NOTMAN & CAMPBELL, PARK STREET. 

STTJTI3IO : 

99 Boylston Street, opposite Public Garden, 

BOSTON. 

Studio elegantly fitted up. Operating and Reception 

Rooms all on first floor, so that sitters need not 

undergo the unpleasant necessity of climbing 

up stairs or going up in elevator. 

Established 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

130 STATE ST,, BOSTON, 

|tationers and flank foot Manufacturers. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 



s. s. GAY. 



EDWIN W. GAT. 



Notman & Campbell, 

MONTREAL, 

And 4 Park Street, - - BOSTON. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED, 
London, 1862. Paris, 1867. Philadelphia (Centennial), 1876. 



*(Pass pitotograglurs* 



COPYING, 



ALFRED IB DFLTTSZHI, 



Plummer's Block, Corner Auburn and Lexington Streets, 
AUBURNDALE. 

SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Ladies and gentlemen visiting Boston, either on busi- 
ness or pleasure, should not fail to visit Learned & Co's 
new and elegant Dining Rooms, 413 Washington Street, 
where all the choice viands of the market are served at 
a very moderate price. 

I. M. LEARNED & CO. 
THE EAGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers, under Patents of Geo. R. Eager & Co., of 

Pants, Overalls, Drawers, &c. 

Also, Sole Manufacturers of "The Ironclad" Pants and Overalls. 
39 KINGSTON ST., BOSTON. 

3XriOTr3:01_jS dfc Er^v.T_iT_i 7 

Publishers, Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Manufacturers of BLAKE BOOKS, 

32 Bromfield Street, - - - BOSTON. 

For Student and all kinds of Lamps, 
Gas Fixtures, etc., call on S. Brownell 
& Son, 680 Washington Street, corner 
Beach Street, Boston. 

C. SARGENT BIRD, 

Patent Medicines, fancy Goods, etc. Physicians' 

Prescriptions carefully prepared at all hours, day 

and night. 



HASKIN'S BLOCK, AUBURN ST, 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



FRANK WOOD, 

— STEAM PRINTE R ,— 

No. 352 Washington Street. Nearly opp. Bromfield St. 
BOSTON. 

Special attention given to College and School Work. 

ABRAM FRENCH & CO. 

Importers of 

il((lilllf f 
CHINA, GJ,ASS ADD PLATED WAKES, 

Wholesale and retail, 

89, 91 and 93 Franklin Street, corner Devonshire, 

BOSTON. 

Chapin & Anderson, 

Successors to A. Littlefield, 
UNDER UNITED STATES HOTEL, 



WE 



in all its branches, and Finishing in Crayon, India Ink, 
Water Color and Oil. 



iisii ^m wmAMmm® 

GEO. S. BRYANT & CO. 
34 Bromfield Street, .... Boston. 

Framing Reasonably and Promptly Done. 

F. H. PLUTA, 

DEALER IN 

PEOYISIONS, 

COK* AUBURN & LEXINGTON STS, 

GRAND EDUCATIONAL EXCURSION TO EUROPE 

IN TME SUMMER OF 1879. 

Extended Tours through Great Britain and 
the most picturesque and interesting Continental 
countries. Special Advantages of an extraordinary 
character. The cheapest and best Excursion ever 
planned. For circulars, giving full particulars, address 
E. TOCRJEE, Boston, Mass. 



100 DOLLARS SAYED 



Each family can save this amount every year by pur- 
chasing their Groceries of 

C, D. COBB & BROTHERS, 

726 Washington Street, 
—BOSTON 

LOOK AT SOME OF OUR PRICES: 

Finest Imported Tea, 70 cents lb. 

Very Fine Tea, 60 cents lb. 

Usually sold by other dealers at 75 cents. 
Best Barrel of Flour in Boston, .... $9.00 

Pure Cream Tartar, 40 cents 

Pure Cassia, 35 cents lb. 

Strictly Pure Ground Cloves, . . ■ . 45 cents lb. 

Pure Ground Ginger 12 cents lb. 

Fine Mixed Teas, from .... 40 to 70 cents lb. 
Pure Old Gov. Java Coffee Roasted, 3 pounds for $1 00 
Best Porto Rico Molasses 60 cents 

BEST GOODS at LOWEST PRICES, 

AT 

G. D. COBB & BROTHERS', 

726 and 728 Washington Street.* 

All orders for 25 dollars, not including sugars, delivered 
free one hundred miles. Send for catalogue of goods with 
prices. 

FURNITURE^ 

THE WAY BUSINESS IS DONE AT 

Paine's Manufactory, 

141 PBIEND ST. and 48 CANAL ST., 
BOSTON. 



SALESMAN'S ORDERS. 

Date your memorandum book every morning. Sell 
strictly for Cash, at the marked price. Represent goods 
just as you know them to be. 

Enter on your book, and copy on delivery book, name 
of purchaser in full, where, when and how to be sent. 
Name each article, number and price. Hand your book 
to Entry Clerk to copy on to the Blotter, and to make 
bill; all bills to be receipted by Cashier. Have goods 
paid for before delivery, when you can do so; only con- 
ditionally delivered until paid for. Unless bills are to be 
paid before delivery, request parties with whom we are 
unacquainted to give names to whom they refer. 

All goods to be delivered by Delivery Clerk of the 
Department. 

See that every thing on your book is charged up every 
day on the Blotter. 

See the Delivery Book every morning, that all your 
orders have been delivered promptly. 

Promise only what you can fulfill. 

See that you have credit for all sales actually made by 
you. 

Be courteous to each other. 

Undertake to serve only one party at a time. 

By adopting these rules, and having the best-selected 
assortment of furniture to be found in America, this 
establishment is attracting the attention of customers far 
and near. See their new illustrated price list. 





IDXJ^Sl FEJVAI3ST-A. FACTI.' 



Volume IV. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS., MAY, 1879. 



Number 8. 



CARPETS! 

JOHN H. PRAY, SONS 4 CO. 

The Largest 

Wholesale and Retail Carpet Dealers 

in New England. 

We are always prepared to show a complete stock 
of seasonable patterns, in every variety of Carpetings, 
embracing 

AXMINSTERS, 

WILTONS, 

VELVETS, 

English and American BODY BRUSSELS, 

TAPESTRIES, 

3-PLYS, 

EXTRA SUPERS, 

Etc., Etc. 

We make a specialty of 

Oriental and Indian Rags, 

And in our collection can be found 
specimens from 

Turkey, 

Persia, 

Arabia, 

India, 

Egypt, 

China, 

Japan, 

And many other Eastern states or provinces. We also 
make a specialty of contracting for the furnishing of 

CHURCHES, 

HOTELS, 

STEAMBOATS, 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 
SCHOOLS, 

HOSPITALS, 

SOCIETY HALLS. 

Handling, as we do, large quantities of goods, and 
dealing only in standard makes, we can guarantee per- 
fect satisfaction, both as regards quality and price, to all 
our patrons. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 
558 and 560 Washington St. 



BY O. E. O. 

Far from our boat upon the stream, 
Dance sunbeams on the waters glowing; 

But by our side no ripples gleam, 
And dull to us the gentle flowing. 

The sun at morn is dressed in gold, 
And fair his robe at eve's declining; 

But at the noon his brightest fold 
Has lost its tints and rainbow lining. 

O angel, bright thy wings illume, 
When thou art passed or far before us ; 

But dull to mortal eyes thy plume, 
When hovering with thy blessing o'er us. 

Thy year now rising o'er our way 
In hues of hope and dew-drops glowing. 

Too soon will fade to common day, 
And we be heedless of its going. 



BOSTON. 



, April — , 1879. 

My Dear " Leaves " : — 
Burns says : 

" I long hae thought, my youthful friend, 
A something to have sent you, 
Though it should serve nae other end 
Than just a kind memento ; " 

and I have been meaning for such a long 
time " a something to have sent you," part- 
ly to show that I had not forgotten you, 
and partly, I will confess, because I was 
egotistical enough to think that, perhaps, 
you would not be unwilling to hear from 
the class of "18. So I have taken my writ- 
ing materials, and settled myself for a good 
long talk with you this snowy afternoon — 
yes, snowy, even though we are so far ad- 
vanced in spring. I shouldn't like for any 
one else to say it — but, really, our New 
England weather is a trial to one's patience. 
Only two days since, in one of my walks, 
I noted how green the grass was growing, 
how fast the crocuses were springing up, 
and could almost detect the fragrance of 
violets in the soft, spring-like air. But, 
alas ! to-day the most vivid imagination 
can detect nothing in the air but spiteful 
gusts of snow, a goodly quantity of which 
covers the ground, and brings to a prosaic 
nature frightful visions of the mud which 
will follow. 

But I promised myself that no kind of 
weather should make me complain, after 
being blest with such a lovely, bright Easter 



day. Good Friday — that sad, sad day — 
was dark and gloomy; Saturday it rained, 
and many expected a stormy Sabbath ; but 
it proved gloriously beautiful, and no one 
could help feeling happy in the church, 
radiant with flowers, whose perfume filled 
the air ; while the choir sang of the resur- 
rection of Him whose holy life is symbol- 
ized by the snowy Easter-lilies. Truly, we 
felt that Christ had risen indeed, and hearts 
were raised in silent thanks to Him who 
suffered for our transgressions. 

Last Easter I was at the Seminary, and 
remember it distinctly — as, indeed, I re- 
member everything connected with the old 
pleasant life there — though it seems so 
long ago since I left it, and there have 
been so many changes with you who re- 
main. One of my '78 girls wrote to me in 
regard to the school : "A kind of jealous 
rage takes possession of me when I think 
of my place being filled up and my name 
becoming only a memory." And I am 
sure we all say ditto, though, of course, 
we can expect nothing different ; but please 
give us a kind thought once in a while, for 
you will soon have left the old place, and 
then you will know how we feel at the 
thought of being forgotten. Be assured 
we have not lost interest in our Alma 
Mater, and some of us are looking eagerly 
forward to Commencement time, when we 
expect to join hands with you again. How 
I envy you the opportunity of listening to 
James T. Fields, in another one of his de- 
lightful lecture courses. He is a most 
entertaining speaker on literature, and his 
personal acquaintance with literary per- 
sons, together with his pleasant voice and 
charming manner, leave nothing to be de- 
sired. It is to be hoped that the Leaves 
will favor its readers with abstracts of the 
lectures ; in that way we can participate 
somewhat in your enjoyment. 

Do you know how anxiously we old girls 
look for the coming of the Leaves each 
month ? They are the link which hold us 
to the school ; and every item is read with 
interest, even though it relates to some one 
we have never seen. Dear me ! how fast 
our Lasell girls are getting married. Al- 
most every week brings news of some fresh 
engagement, and it quite gives me the 



L A S E L L L E A V E S. 



blues; for, in spite of all vows and protesta- 
tions to the contrary, they do neglect and 
forget their old friends after marriage. 
The snow still falls, and darkness is fast 
gathering around ; so I must lay aside my 
pen — although reluctantly — and bid you 
good-night. One of the Six. 



In these latter days, and particularly as 
the scholastic year draws near its close, 
the student world is excited over the much 
debated question of " Commencement." 

In some of our colleges the Faculty, tak- 
ing the matter into their own hands, have 
already decided the question, and the stu- 
dents of said institutions are happy in 
having the subject settled, although not 
always to their taste. 

In our quiet little home, "Commence- 
ment or no " seems to have been answered 
by our Principal, who has kindly invited 
the Senior class, as a whole, to participate. 
All discussions of the subject are to be lis- 
tened to after the 12th of June next. 

In most of our colleges the classes are so 
large it is impossible for all to take part in 
the closing exercises ; consequently, it is 
left to the students to choose their repre- 
sentatives. We are all familiar with the 
trouble which often arises at this crisis. 
The strongest in numbers elect their men, 
and, perhaps, some of the best students 
and ablest men are left out These natu- 
rally lose their interest in an entertainment 
in which they should justly have a part. 
The dissatisfaction continues, until, finally, 
the abolishing of a public Commencement 
is discussed, and perhaps carried. 

It seems that means might be employed 
by which the right men could be chosen. 
Merit in writing should be the true test. A 
just decision might be obtained, if those 
who desire to contest place their essays, 
without name attached, in the hands of a 
committee composed of members of the 
Faculty, or persons chosen by them. The 
decision of said committee, given without 
reference to personal feelings or outside 
influence, would be just. 

The argument is brought forward by 
those who desire to abolish Commencement 
exercises, that they encourage a spirit of 
rivalry in the contestants, which is most 
injurious. 

To these we would reply, that the true 
student should not, and does not, entertain 
toward his mates any real desire of rivalry ; 
and, should this spirit be present, the abol- 
ishing of Commencement would have little 
effect upon such a one, for they would find 



plenty of opportunity in after life to culti- 
vate and exercise such a spirit. 

The part which the true student plays on 
Commencement Day, is to him only one of 
the many duties which have been his dur- 
ing the college days ; and the earnest effort 
he makes to do his best in this the last duty 
under the care of his Alma Mater, is sure 
to be crowned with success. 



Scientific, 

The Seniors just now are in a state of 
bewilderment somewhat resembling that of 
the Dutchman, who, when his twin-brother 
and exact likeness deceased, remarked to 
sympathizing friends that "he did not feel 
certain whether it was himself or his 
brother who had died, for they had always 
been taken for each other ; and he thought 
that, in being christened, their names had 
become changed." 

Does the earth move or not? "That is 
the question ! " We think — but no; we do 
not hold any opinion whatever on the sub- 
ject. We did once; but science is pro- 
gressive, and requires a fleet thinker in- 
deed to keep up with its strides. 

The cause of all this commotion is a re- 
cent treatise upon "Astronomy," by Pro- 
fessor Schceffer, of Berlin, Germany. lie 
comes boldly forward with the old Ptole- 
maic theory, and affirms that Copernicus 
— poor, deluded man — was totally mis- 
taken in his ideas; and that the earth — 
this great, grand world of ours — is the 
center of the universe. It is surely time 
for us to hold up our heads again, for now 
we may feel assured that we do not live 
upon an insignificant little planet which is 
a mere speck in space ; but, on the con- 
traiy, that all the suns of the universe, and 
the millions of other heavenly bodies, re- 
volve in order about us. 

Still farther : the learned professor goes 
on to state that the earth is stationary ; 
while the sun, moon and stars, as they rise 
and set, present to us not an apparent, but 
their real motion. Some very strong ar- 
guments sustain the German philosopher; 
hence, as has been before remarked, we are 
in a state of agitation really quite alarm- 
ing. However, we do not intend doing Mr. 
Lockyer the injustice to forsake his teach- 
ings thus early, nor do we exactly relish 
the thought of having spent a whole term 
in learning mere folly. 

If scientists will please clear up this 
matter before the 12th of June next, they 
will confer a great favor upon the class of 
"19. 



Stiisate w!@ Saw W&ttes 
Yiaily Lttttnu 

My Dear Girls : — You don't know how 
great a pleasure you are giving me by your 
hearty, pleasant letters. I have enjoyed 
every word, and I mean to answer every 
one. I want to. This is just to say that, 
if you don't hear from me before Com- 
mencement, you may know it is because I 
cannot get time; in which case you will 
pardon the delay, won't you ? and take this 
as a personal invitation to come up to 
Commencement, if you can ; and remem- 
ber, each has her own warm place in the 
love and memory of 

Your friend, 

C. C. Bragdon. 



Our friend and neighbor, the Tufftonian, 
would add to its attractiveness by giving 
more of its columns to personals. The 
description of Emilia, one of the minor 
characters in Shakespeare's Othello, is 
well written. We should enjoy reading the 
author's opinion of Iago. 

With pleasure we notice the kindly crit- 
icism of our sheet in the Acta Sjholaslica, 
for April. 

Our last number of the Bales Student has 
been duly perused, and we close the pam- 
phlet with the verdict — good. Only once 
during the reading were we disappointed. 
The poem entitled "Retrospection," is 
hardly long enough for the subject. May 
we hope to hear more from E. S. R. next 
time ? 

The Exonian for April doubtless feels 
the effect of spring, judging from the 
number of Latin quotations which appear 
in its columns. In other words, we are in- 
clined to think that too many foreign quo- 
tations are apt to give the paper a some- 
what youthful character. 



fit Ifiuttt's T@t©l, 

In the still air the music lies unheard ; 
In the rough marble beauty hides unseen; 
To make the music and the beauty needs 
The master's touch, the sculptor's chisel keen. 
Great Master, touch us with thy skillful hand; 
Let not the music that is in us die! 
Great Sculptor, hew and polish us; nor let, 
Hidden and lost, thy form within us lie ! 
Spare not the stroke ! do with us as Thou wilt ! 
Let there be naught unfinished, broken, marred ; 
Complete Thy purpose, that we may become 
Thy perfect image, thou our God and Lord ! 

— Bonar. 



LAS ELL LEAVES. 



fbft fm mi 



311 of M@tin Ii 
rngnts. 



mmm-- 



We find in the world two classes of peo- 
ple : the one progressive, seeking for the 
new, whose cry is, " On, forever on " ; the 
other conservative, opposed to change, 
and clinging with pertinacity to old modes 
of thought and living, old customs and old 
things. This latter class are ever looking 
backward instead of forward ; and to such 
as these did Solomon, the wise man, speak, 
saying: "Say not thou what is the cause 
that the former days were better than 
these, for thou dost not inquire wisely 
concerning them." And what are some of 
the flaws in our boasted works of progress ? 
The sewing-machine is a very common, it 
seems now almost indispensable, article of 
furniture. We wonder how our grand- 
dames could get along without it, and 
imagine the majority of women who did 
the sewing, like Hood's heroine " who 
sang the song of the shirt," with "fingers 
weary and worn." Undoubtedly the same 
amount of work took a deal more of time, 
and, perhaps, strength, than under the 
present dispensation ; but with increased 
facilities for producing, proportionally great 
is the demand, and the extra frills and fur- 
belows require all the time gained by the 
easier and more rapid modes of sewing. 
We pride ourselves on our very superior 
illuminating methods, and compare with 
satisfaction our brilliant blaze of gas to the 
feeble glimmer of tallow-dips and pine 
knots. The oil-cups with which the old 
Romans, with all their advanced ideas, 
contented themselves, form a decided con- 
trast indeed with the electric light now 
rapidly becoming popular. 

But " no rose is without its thorn," and 
our methods are not perfection ; illumina- 
ting gas has an injurious effect on the 
human system for which its greater safety 
and brilliancy do not entirely atone. It 
seems that when man has so secured one 
of the wonderful, incomprehensible powers 
of nature under his control as to make of it 
a servant, a messenger of his thoughts, that 
we should all pat him on the shoulder, and 
congratulate ourselves that the height of 
perfection is reached on one point, at least ; 
but there have been those grumblers who 
stoutly maintained the uselcssness of the 
telegraph, and affirm, with decision, that 
we should be happier and better satisfied, 
and that much needless excitement and 
sorrow would be spared, had it never been 
invented. 
The following is a p